Obsc'zine

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You may be looking for the British zine, Obsczine.

Zine
Title: Obsc'zine
Publisher: T'Kuhtian Press
Editor(s): Lori Chapek-Carleton
Date(s): 1977-1980
Series?:
Medium: print
Genre: gen, slash, het
Fandom: Star Trek:TOS, some multimedia
Language: English
External Links:
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Obsc'zine is an adult Star Trek: TOS zine (with het and slash, and a little femslash). In addition to fanfic it featured limericks, cartoons and nude portrait fanart. It grew out of the adult issues from Warped Space and was among the early publishers of K/S fan fiction.

a flyer for "Obsc'zine" and "Warped Space"

A Fan Comments in 1977

Yet another contender in the 'adult/porn zine' category, the OBSC'ZINE is neatly printed and attractively packaged. The stories and the illos are quite explicit, and, on the whole, there is a lack of the lightness of touch and wry humor which marked OB's predecessors, WARPED SPACE X and XX. Many of OB's stories read like sex-manual exerpts, complete with graphic illustrations. Also, if the K/S homosexual relationship does not thrill you, be forwarned that many of the stories in the first two issues of OBSC'ZINE were oriented in that direction.[1]

And What Another Fan Has To Say 17 Years Later

"The Obsc'zines were a great series. Kinda like the ASCEM of the zine world; a little bit of everything - het, slash, threesome, BDSM, femslash, and the obligatory "orgy on the Enterprise"."[2]

Its Explicitness

There was a lot of discussion regarding this zine in the early issues of Interstat, primarily focussing on its content and whether readers had been properly warned. Keep in mind that these discussions were happening in 1978, when any story depicting homosexuality was deemed pornographic in many states, and thus illegal to be sold through the mails. See Slash Controversies#Illegality of Slash, and Slash Controversies#The SeKWester*Con Slash & Porn Debates where some fans raised similar objections to explicit material in general.

A fan registered her disgust:

Fan fiction writers have degenerated to the point of of illiteracy. Their characters have the morals and vocabulary of gutter rats. Demeaning the characters in perverted and/or sadistic behavior, homosexuality included, has no redeeming social or literary value. Several of these futile attempts at placing thoughts on paper consist of no more than plotless sexual fantasies drawn out in tiresome, explicit detail. Cannot these erstwhile authors raise their standards of communication to a redeemable level? There is a distinct difference between a general zine, ("Showcase", "Stardate Unknown"), and an adult zine, ("R&R", "Rigel".) However, one should not confuse an adult story with one dealing with homosexuality. If you publishers insist on inundating the reader with this kind of material, at least have the courtesy comparable to "Alternative" and state what sort of writing your zine carries and allow the purchaser discretion. In point: "Obsc'zine" does not warn that their stories deal almost exclusively with homosexuality. Contrariwise, "Alternative" states in print on the flyer that this is the content. Surely having written the story you cannot be ashamed to admit to it on a flyer...or would you? [3]

A fan commented on the letter above:

I wish to point out that "redeeming social or literary value", like beauty. Is probably in the eyes of the beholder. ST fiction, like any other kind, runs the gamut of emotions and sexual standards, with plenty available in all areas to suit the tastes of the buyers. This is as it should be, and nobody twists arms to force more conservative folks to read material beyond their enjoyment or understanding. With regard to the OBSC'ZINES, remember that this zine grew out of extra material left over from WARPED SPACE'S Double X ish, 020, and certainly anybody who read WS 20 knew exactly what to expect further along that line. I have been unable to turn up any separate flyers for OBS, if indeed any were printed, but the regular ads for WS carried notices of it, with its "X" rating in plain sight. As a matter of curiosity and with reference to Ms Bates' statement that "their stories deal almost exclusively with homosexuality", I went over the contents of both of the issues now available, and came up with the following: OBS 01 had seventeen stories, all lengths, and of these, eleven were "straight", four were humorous-homosexual, and two were serious K/S. OBS 02 had fifteen stories/articles, and fourteen of them were straight. No K/S in this one, only a Christine/Uhura fantasy. So dealing exclusively with homosexuality, they don't — perhaps it just seems that way. Be warned, Karen, that there are several zines about to be published which DO deal in serious detail with the no-called K/S "Relationship" — and which are advertising themselves as such, to avoid any misunderstanding from unknowing buyers. There's room for all of us under the broad wings of ST fandom, and there are probably many others who buy practically everything, as I do — and enjoy most of it, whether straight-childlsh-action-adventure, deeper character development or zines with a highly focused sexual interest. IDIC, that's us.[4]

In 1981, the editor asked other fans if they thought this zine was offensive:

I'm a dedicated feminist and ERA supporter, and I like strong female characters in fanfic... my printer's assistants are all strong feminists and ERA supporters, are actively involved in supporting the local Lesbian Theater, etc., and some of them have strongly expressed the opinion that Obsc'zine is "degrading to women." I know Alderaan is primarily a SW oriented zine, but if anyone would care to debate the question of Obsc'zine in specific or "adult" fanfic in general, I'd be interested in hearing points of view especially since... the active subfandoms are predominantly female.[5]
One fan replied:
I am a feminist and. I can understand why some women may be offended by Obsc'zine. They are essentially against being displayed as sex objects, as [is] apt to happen in most cases of nudity and sexual diversions in magazines like Playgirl and Penthouse, but I think [that judging] Obsc'zine this way is an extreme point of view. After all. It's a zine focusing on sexual encounters with either gender. There's some delicious art and wonderfully diversified stories on small aspects of relationships and sex. It really depends on your own ideas of fun, entertainment and pleasure. Each to his or her own viewpoint and taste, I say.[6]

Female Writers and Trekfic: A Laboratory

In 1978, Jacqueline Lichtenberg commented on this zine series:
Hell, twenty years from now the top twelve names in science fiction will all be women who were writing in Star Trek fanzines and are part of our group now. I predict that. I really do. And we'll all be connected, as some of us are now: Steve Barnes, Eleanor Arnason, Ruth Berman, Leslie Lilker... There is a tremendous vortex of energy being created by these people. They're teaching each other to write just like the science fiction people taught each other to write. The science fiction people taught each other to write gadget stories and action-adventure: adolescent, without sex, wooden, without dimension, without psychology. What are the Star Trek women teaching themselves to write - Obsc'zine notwithstanding - well, even that, because it's a psychological study. What they're teaching themselves to write is science fiction soap opera, with a little action-adventure thrown in just for fun, because we know that within every woman there's a hidden man. [7]

Issue 1

front cover of issue #1, Alice Jones
back cover of issue #1, Clare Bell

Obsc'zine 1 was published in March 1977 and has 107 pages. It premiered (and was collated) at SeKWesterCon, Too convention (a Star Trek convention) amongst discussions about the suitability of selling and displaying adult themed art and fan fiction. The cover features a nude Spock, with a strategically placed hand by Alice Jones, who won a FanQ award in 1978. The back cover is a side view of a nude Spock with unicorn. Inside is an "erotic Spock portfolio" drawn by Gayle F.[8]

Artwork by Alice Jones, Clare Bell, Gordon Carleton, Gerry Downes, Gayle F, Leslie Fish, Signe Landon, Nan Lewis, Martynn, Joni Wagner and Bev Zuk.

Table of Contents

inside art from issue #1, Signe Landon for "Vintage Wine" -- Note: Marked as sexually explicit; minimized.
inside art from issue #1, Gayle F. Note: Marked as sexually explicit; minimized.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 1

See reactions and reviews for Kirk's Decision.
See reactions and reviews for Unicorn Horn.
See reactions and reviews for Poses.
See reactions and reviews for Another Saturday Night on the Enterprise.
See reactions and reviews for The Perfect Mate.
See reactions and reviews for Performance.
See reactions and reviews for Aftermath.
[zine]: Obsc'zine was a disappointment. There was little substance, excepting Leslie Fish's 'Poses' and Gayle F's erotic Spock art folio. 'Poses,' a sequel to to Fish's 'Shelter,' deals with the Kirk/Spock homosexual premise. The characterizations are skewed from the TV series, but the story is a well-plotted and insightful speculation [from the Interphase review: 'that incidentally proposes interestingly alien genitalia for our favorite Vulcan.']. Some other fiction didn't quite work: Catherine Clair's 'Bitter Dreams' at least has an unusual premise; Amy Falkowitz's 'Unicorn Horn' was a pleasant farce; Frankie Jemison's 'Kirk's Decision' had a nice warm feeling to it, but suffered by appearing in the same zine with Fish's incomparably powerful treatment. Most other stories were not only insubstantial, they weren't genuinely erotic, though they did manage to be lewd. The artwork, except for Gayle's, Bell's, Fish's and Martynn's, was execrable. Even Gordon Carleton's work was forgettable. Obsc'zine has a long way to go to beat it's (sic) past: Warped Space #10 and #20 were much more interesting.[9]
[zine]: "Poses" is the sequel to "Shelter" (from WARPED SPACE XX). Included with the story are five darkly moody illos by Leslie, including a drawing (white ink on black board, as they all are) of her version of Spock's "orchid-anthurium" genitalia (fascinating!). This story is "must" reading for the dedicated K/S fan—or any K/S fan! Very briefly, it concerns what happens when Kirk, Spock, and McCoy are rescued, return to the ship, and try to return to their former lives and their respective "poses" of Galactic Wonderboy Starship Captain and SuperVulcan (and an uninvolved, impartial Doctor, who "saw nothing"). But the tension is far too strong for all of them. Kirk breaks down and tries to confront Spock. Spock retreats—flees!—from Kirk, and desperately tries to resign. McCoy loses his cool pose completely, and curses Spock, admitting he saw every thing that occurred when they were marooned and Spock seduced Kirk.... In agony, Spock returns to Kirk and admits his feelings of love. They make up and make love, of course, and all ends ecstatically. But do read it yourself to experience Leslie's marvelously psycho-analytical description of what goes on in the heads of the protagonists, and how they react, striking sparks off each other. While fans almost always take this story perfectly seriously, and straight-forwardly, at face value, it was actually written somewhat tongue-in-cheek. Leslie claimed she intentionally used the elements, and the emotions, of an adolescent first-love affair. The thoughts and reactions of Kirk and Spock are so intense and seem so true-to-life however, that "Poses" strongly impresses readers with its poignancy and reality, not all with humor. OBSC'ZINE #1, also, offers a very fine story-poem by Frankie Jemison, concerning what would have happened eventually to Kirk and Spock if they hadn't been marooned and gotten "Shelter." When Spock's mental state keeps deteriorating his disturbed sleep, longing for Kirk, and consequent guilt—he asks for a transfer, but will not explain why. Then he tries to resign, but a very hurt Kirk keeps refusing and begging for an explanation. Finally, when Spock is discovered planning suicide, Kirk agrees to the transfer. Seeing how much he has hurt Kirk by his behavior, how ill and miserable Kirk looks, Spock feels he must bare his soul, that Kirk deserves an explanation of Spock's guilty love. Afterwards, Spock in silent shame, expecting Kirk's anger or laughter, reaches for his transfer...but is stopped when his hand is taken and grasped lovingly by Kirk. This poem is one of my personal favorites. I recommend it highly. There are also several K/S vignettes—with some, uhh, strange humor, in the WARPED SPACE vein. "Kirk's Decision," by Frankie Jemison, takes place after Kirk serves Spock in pon farr. It was a nightmare experience for Kirk, and he does not realize that a bond was formed, but only on Spock's side. Therefore, when Kirk later unwittingly makes love to a woman, Spock senses it, and attempts suicide. He is rescued in time by McCoy. Kirk rushes to his bedside and, making the decision to become Spock's exclusive bondmate, kisses his lips, as his eyes open slowly. The watching McCoy, tears in his eyes, vows: "Even if Spock couldn't wear white...the whole ship would work their asses to the bone for this. The wedding would be the biggest bash in Starfleet history." "In "Another Saturday Night on the Enterprise," by "Phula Blechundschmidt", Kirk entices a rather skittish, uptight Spock to make love in the ship's swimming pool, for a change. It's Spock's turn "to be on top," and the vignette concludes: '"That was nice, Spock,' he said sincerely, 'You're a fine stud'...Spock regarded Kirk levelly and his mouth twitched into a half-smile. 'Thank you, sir,' he replied. 'You make a very good ass, yourself.'" Well, you see what I mean about the somewhat odd OBSC'ZINE humor! In another K/S vignette, "The Perfect Mate", by Jane Firmstone (also not to taken completely seriously), Kirk has given up the Enterprise and gone away with his wife (the only person for whom he would ever have given up his ship) to live alone, without censure. His wife seems very uncertain of herself, of her appearance, and is desperate to please Kirk, who is loving and understanding toward her. The mail arrives. There is a worn letter addressed to Commander Spock. Kirk hands it to his wife, who is Spock. Notably, OBSC'ZINE #1, also, contains "An Erotic Spock Portfolio," by Gayle F, with interpretations of excellent quality and variety by various writers. "Performance," by D.T. Steiner, is particularly interesting. In it, Kirk and Spock are forced into a humiliating sexual performance, an "ancient ritual", on the planet New Lesbos. They must cooperate or be killed. Spock, dressed as a whore, masturbates Kirk. Both are drugged, and McCoy is forcibly kept from interferring. Meanwhile, Spock wonders how the natives knew his feelings about Kirk.... They both reach orgasm...and Spock awakens from this wet dream in a cold sweat. He knows his dreams are caused by the unresolved tensions of pon farr. He wonders if it could be affecting Kirk too, and hopes the linkage will eventually fade. He washes...meditates...sleeps and dreams again, that he is Pegasus flying to the stars, with Bellerophon riding on his back 'his fair hair streaming in the nightwind and his golden eyes shining like sunlight...." There is more plot content, thought, characterization, and sheer beauty condensed in this vignette than there is in most novels. I grieve that Diane Steiner is lost to fandom. In the obligatory orgy-on-the-Enterprise story, "Unicorn's Horn," by Amy Falkowitz, that substance, an aphrodisiac provided by Sulu's disreputable relative Fu-Ling, subverts the crew. When Spock is beleaguered by nymphomaniacal crewwomen in the gym, he yells forlornly for Kirk's help, over the com. Although the unicorn's horn is affecting Kirk, too, he is very worried about Spock, and manages to make it as far as the gym before he is pulled into the orgy—by Uhura. The tongue of a very skilled new companion pulls him out of his erotic daze sometime later. He looks down and sees..."'Spock! What the hell—!' The Vulcan, his eyes gleaming, looked up. 'Is there something wrong, Jim? Do these actions disburb you? Or are you uncomfortable? I do not mean to cause you distress...I thought, we are all in this together anyway...why do you not relax and yield to the logic of the situation?' And the Vulcan ran his fingers down the cleft in Kirk's ass, making his buttocks tighten with delight." Spock assures Kirk that he has never felt better, and Kirk lies back, "deciding that this was going to be most interesting." Eventually the orgy's effects wear off—on everyone but Spock, who is left with a giant, chartreuse erection, which Uhura has a hard time resisting! McCoy cannot help Spock's "problem," and so gives him medical leave to remain in his quarters until the erection wilts. After he leaves Sickbay, Kirk and McCoy cannot contain themselves any longer, and collapse in laughter at the whole situation, especially the prim, "official" description in the medical log of poor Spock's "condition." Sulu is punished by to quarters, but it's not much of a punishment, because Uhura happily decides to keep him company there. "A Friend in Need," a vignette by Gerry Downes, misleadingly reads like a K/S story, but it turns out to be a chess match, not a love match. There are also several K/S limericks better left unquoted, and a tiny vignette, "R.H.I.P." (that is, I presume, "Rank Hath Its Privileges"), by Eileen Roy, in which Scotty wakes up in bed with Chekov! (he's rather disappointed, though) but no hint of how or why they got there. And another vignette, "Bedtime Story", by L. Hunter, has Spock enjoying a little bondage and discipline with a dominatrix—who, at story's end, wonders if there might be something more.. Also, included are a lay-McCoy story (with a comely female ensign), a lay-Spock story (with a comely female lieutenant), a lay-Kirk story (but it's all a weirdly funny dream), a McCoy sex/horror story (with a nasty, alien female), a tale of sex on T'Kuht (Vulcan's supposed twin planet) where Spock unwittingly helps out, and finally, a bored Uhura's bondage-fantasy (with Kirk, of course). The cover is a nice, nude Spock by Alice Jones; the printing (I almost said reproduction!) is not great, however, Except for Gayle's protfolio and Leslie's illos, the other art is not outstanding, thought there is a nice Uhura-in-bondage, by Joni Wagner, and some nice cartoons by Clare Bell for "Unicorn's Horn." [10]
The layout of OB #1 was full of allure,
as was the layout of the crew —
graphically speaking, I'm sure.
I broke into "September Song"
while reading "Vintage Wine", and "Hecate's Hearth" was around
celsius 9.
"Uhura's Fantasy" was a dream,
and "Tears Of Laughter"
was an enterprising scheme!
I've heard of green thumbs,
but speaking concupiscently, Leslie doesn't let down on excitement
'till the living end, does she?
Now I really don't exaggerate
when I say in "Wet Dream"
our Captain did titillate.
In 'Another Saturday Night
On the Enterprise"
Captain James T. Kirk
tried Mr. Spock on for size.
"Bitter Dreams" was quite a shock
with McCoy 'getting it'
instead of Spock!
A "Unicorn Horn" caused a lot of fuss
(bet it came from a rhinoceros.).
"Kirk's Decision"
and "The Perfect Mate",
a dream of Spock's
did consummate.
With some classy poetry
and lotsa limericks —
OB gave this humanoid
her full quota of kicks! [11]
... your zine deserves far more than just a hurried acknowledgement. There were a couple of things in it I hated, several I enjoyed, and some that I loved. On the whole, I enjoyed the zine. First, the items I didn't like. "Perfect Mate." Now, it was cleverly done, and I can see why it was done, but I didn't like it. Basically, I suppose, because I consider 'sex-change' stories to be a cop-out; if you intend to write a homosexual story, write an honest one! And I simply cannot see Spock undergoing a sex-change. No, it's as I said before — their relationship would be openly, honestly homosexual. Having said that, the story was well-constructed, well told. "Another Saturday Night" I felt was written without any real feeling, and existed only for the final pun; had it been shorter, more concise, it would have worked better for me. D. Steiner's "Interpretation [sic]" I hated on first reading, but subsequently I modified my opinion. She was, of course, bound by the illustration, and that was where the problem lay. I could accept Spock's sexual fantasies about Kirk, but I don't think a properly brought-up Vulcan would dream up an audience! Had the illo been simpler, only Kirk and Spock (and without the fancy dress!) I'd have liked it better. Again, though, the actual writing was excellent, and the idea of the fight inducing a semi-bonding ... now, if you could persuade her to do one from Kirk's side, as a companion piece-... "Unicorn Horn" I enjoyed. It was funny, which is a quality often sadly lacking in sex stories. Judging by the way Kirk enjoyed himself, I don't somehow think he'll be too hard on poor Sulu! "Kirk's Decision" was good. It presented the relationship as it should be, based on love, not lust. Kirk had to make a conscious choice to commit himself to Spock, rather than just falling into bed. Now, the main item — "Shelter" and "Poses". By tho way, thank you for getting WS 20; on the whole it wasn't as good as OBSC'ZINE, but was still worth reading. Anyway, "Shelter" [12] was everything I had been led to expect — a beautifully-written, tender story, done with compassion and understanding. The scene where Spock confesses his love and Kirk accepts him was really lovely. The only slight criticism is a vague uneasiness at McCoy's being turned into a reluctant Peeping-Tom, but it didn't spoil the story. "Poses" followed on naturally. Having accepted Spock out of love initially, Kirk finds he has been sexually aroused by him. His hesitation at abandoning his image, and Spock's reluctance to drop his Super-Vulcan pose, their mutal misunderstanding of each other's reactions were wholly credible. More sex-based than "Shelter", it nevertheless conveyed the love perfectly. Gerry Downes' little tailpiece finished the zine perfectly. That'll teach us not to jump to conclusions! [13]
The OBSC'ZINE is fan-fucking-tastic!
The style is both taut and elastic.
The art is terrific and so damned specific
it made me react like a spastic.
And "Poses"! This sequel's so great,
enough praise my brain can't create.
I love it! You've said
all the thoughts in my head.
When's the next one? How long must we wait? [14]
I think it's the art ... which gives an x-rated 'zine a smutty appearance more than the writing. I think what it boils down to is this: are we calling these 'zines x-rated, or are we calling them adult-Trek 'zines? If they're adult, it's not really necessary for the graphic illustrations. After all, ST itself had much implied sex, and adult-stories would only be more explicit. But the detailed drawings seem to stamp such 'zines as purely and clearly x-rated. Does fandorm want adult-ST fiction, or do they want the extreme gaudy x-rated 'zines? With GROPE, R&R, ALTERNATIVE and other such porno 'zines, there seems to be an in crease in demand of these 'zines. As I've said, it's the art I find somewhat objectionable. I'm sure the female readers are drawn toward the nude sketches of Kirk and Spock, as the men probably are of Uhura and Chapel, etc., but let's face it, these drawings aren't stimulating (how can a person be stimulated by a drawing?), and they certainly don't take the place of PLAYBOY and the like. So, why include so many nude illos? Sure, some of the pieces of art are illustrations of scenes in the stories, but must virtually every piece of art depict a lurid sex act? Also, I've found that these stories lack any semblance of a plot. Why can't the sexual goings-on be intertwined with some sort of story? Just describing, in a detailed manner, sexual acts, seems a little tacky.[15]
Wow! Boy howdy! Whooeee! And other suitable expressions — and to think we wondered what you would do for an encore with WS 20! You shewed us, kid. You and Gayle and Fish and Phula and all your other talented contributors — I don't know when I have ever had such a good time reading a zine ... Fish has opened Up a whole new game with her description of the strange alien arrangement, one which I hope she will explore further, so to speak. In fact, couldn't we get her to do one of her delicious deadpan physiological and sociological studies on both male and female Vulcans as it relates to their primary sexual organs? For instance, just what is it that Spock's little grabbers hang onto? "Anchored"? No movement?' Fish's skill with drawing as well as writing can insure some dandy illos, perhaps eye-popping, mind-boggling illos. Also, it would be interesting to know what happens to Spock's floral centerpiece when he goes to the head — or are there other elements that haven't yet been introduced to us? [16]
With regard to the current discussions on homosexuality ... after re-reading My Secret Garden: Female Sexual Fantasies by Nancy Friday a number of ideas concentrated in my mind: 1) a large portion of ST fanfiction is written by (and for?) fe males; 2) zine editors often complain about the frequent occurance and lack of originality of get-whoever stories and Kirk-and-Spock get together stories among the manuscripts submitted to them; 3) pornography written by and for males is notoriously lacking in originality and "literary" quality (you can't over-struc ture the readers' fantasies without turn ing them off, when the focus is on the fictional characters rather than on the reader you have literature, not hard porn); 4) pornography written by-and-for males is notoriously replete with sado-maso chism and lesbian episodes. Make of this what you will, bearing in mind that all explanations of any aspect of anything are invariably oversimplified. With regard to the possibility of a Kirk-Spock relationship ...[things about dolphins and chimps snipped]... If Vulcans were strictly bound by in stinct in partner selection, Spock would not exist, and there would' be no need for the extensive rituals surrounding pon farr (you don't ritualize breathing). If Vulcans were strictly monogamous, T'Pring would not have looked at anyone else, once bonded to Spock. If one assumes that Vulcans 1) consider sexual intercourse not accompanied by telepathic bonding (or deep linking) to be perversion, 2) consider deliberate attempts to prevent conception to be murder, blasphemy, perversion, etc., 3) are ordinarily (except at pon farr) much less interested in sex than humans are due to hormonal changes, cultural conditioning and the traumatic nature of the experience of pon farr on individuals and on society, and 4) are a less social species than humans are, with a greater need for privacy and solitude and a much larger normal personal space, it is pos sible to account, for all known Vulcan behavioral patterns and also possible to state that it is quite' possible for Spock to be less hung up by a relationship than Kirk would be. Spock would probably not spontaneously go beyond a telepathic union, but once a bond had been established, physical reinforcement of it could well be considered valid (eccentric, perhaps, but not perverted.). Promiscuity would be considered much worse than a stable homosexual union, provided one's reproductive and marital responsibilities were not avoided. (I am not sure a sane telepath can be promiscuous, not in a society which places a high value on privacy, anyway.) Spock would have trouble dealing with the establishment of an acknowledged bond with Kirk, Kirk would have trouble dealing with the "homosexual" aspects of the situation ... but might be able to deal with a telepathic/emotion bond only in terms of sexuality ...[17]
You have a curious mixture of stories here from the very excellent to the very bad — as far as story content goes. My favorite has to be "Hecate's Hearth". But then, I do get off on horror stories, and Faddis is a fantastic author anyway. Close behind that were "Unicorn Horn" (the funniest orgy story I've read), "Bitter Dreams," and "Tears Of Laughter". Order of listing does not indicate preference. For the most part, too, I enjoyed the other items in the Spock Portfolio. Now to the worst: and why I dislike them. You might say I have a case of AC-rophobia. But the one thing I do not like at all are these gay stories, and you seem to have a multiplicity of them in this issue. "Kirk's Decision" completely turned me off, as did "Another Saturday Night" ... "The Perfect Mate" (thoroughly rotten), "Intimacy", "Bedtime Story" (along another subject matter but it still sticks in my craw) and "Poses". (Wasn't "Shelter" enough?) Sorry. Perhaps I'm just too much of a thoroughly heterosexual female, but these gay stories turn me completely off. It's more than just a dislike on my part. It seems to me to be a total mischaracterization. In ST we were clearly shown two well-adjusted, heterosexual males in Kirk and Spock, and these stories seem to be perverting their characters. What is all this interest in homo-stuff, anyway? Some of the stories, I must admit, are well-written, and my comments do not necessarily reflect on the author's writing abilities. Take "Poses" for example. Leslie Fish can write a good story, and make it interesting, but the basic premise of the story is just a bit too much. To paraphrase someone — not only may the Kirk/Spock premise rest in peace, may it also rest in pieces — very tiny pieces. I can only hope you don't have much, if any, of these gay stories next time around. Maybe this fad will soon run its course ...[18]
I wasn't going to gush about "Shelter" and "Poses" ... but it seems appropriate, because Fish and Agostino show great psychological insight in these stories and express in fictional form the importance of integration. Spock has repressed a whole chunk of his total personality, but then so has Kirk. In Kirk's case, how ever, what has been repressed is his "feminine" side. To hold to his super-macho "Jim, the Galactic Hero" image he has denied a part of himself that cannot be denied without cost. Human beings are basically androgynous, a fact which Fish/Agostino understand very well, and the humanization of James Kirk is as important an element in the Kirk-Spock re lationship stories as the change in Spock. Basically, each is helping the other along toward that integration of personality they both need. Even though Leslie Fish and Carol Hunterton have responded beautifully (WS 23) to criticism of Kirk and Spock as lovers, I feel compelled to add my two credits' worth. We hear about all different kinds of love — friendship, sexual love, love of family — between and among people, but I don't think we're talking about different things, only different manifestations of the same thing. And the boundaries which separate those manifestations are amorphous, weak and can easily become nonexistent. I think any kind of love relationship carries sexual potential; whether or not that potential becomes actualized depends on all manner of variables in conditioning, environment, etc. Bev Clark has pointed out (WS 18) that you can't judge 22nd Century people by 20th Century moral standards. As it is, twentieth century moral standards are pretty variable. Plenty of people besides myself have no trouble at all accepting a Kirk-Spock relationship of the kind described in "Poses". Anita Bryant notwithstanding, I find it hard to believe that a 22nd Century person, exposed to the variety of a galaxy-wide culture, won't be many times more liberal in these matters. In fact, one of the criticisms I have of much of Trekflc is its tendency to give insufficient allowance for the change in mores brought about by 200 years and exposure to many alien civilizations. Granted, there will always be people whose opinions are immune to change; I still find altogether more 20th century prejudices in 22nd century minds than seems likely. I've already told you what I think of "Poses" best thing in the 'zine by far. It shouldn't be compared to something like "Unicorn Horn" — they're two very different things. The latter is an enjoyable farce and succeeded in what It was trying to do. It was interesting to actually read it, having already heard the plot in detail from Amy herself. Clare Bell's illos were marvelous (bacover included). The trouble with some of the other stuff, e.g. "Vintage Wine" is that something written just for the sake of describing a sexual encounter gets pretty boring after awhile. Something like "Poses", however, in addition to being as erotic as hell, has a lot more going for It besides. The eroticism is an integral part of the whole, not the story's sole excuse for being. I liked "The Idiot And The Oddity" and "A Friend In Need" — very funny! [Gayle F's] portfolio was (as usual) fantastic; the illo for "Vaster Than Empires" was especially terrific. I liked D.T. Steiner's interpretation particularly well, especially the Pegasus/Bellerophon imagery at the end. "Bitter Dreams" turned me most emphatically off. I don't care for that much Thanatos in my Eros, thank you. Didn't like the premise of "The Perfect Mate". Now that is farfetched. Besides, I reject the idea that one partner in a sexual relationship has has to give up his/her identity to the other. Love each other for what you are. This implies, also, that the male/female bonding is the only way to go, and I don't accept that. "Kirk's Decision" I'm not sure of, "Aftermath" I like. On the whole, the art was excellent. [Gayle F] great as always, ditto Jones; the Wagner illo on p. 72 exceptional; loved Clare Bell's illos, as I said. And nobody should illo Fish but Fish. I always admire her work even when I don't like it (if you know what I mean). I really liked the illo on p. 95, and p. 78.[19]
Having carefully pondered the matter at great length, I decided to do it. I scrimped, and I saved, and I never let on what I was doing. They'll never find out! And when it gets here, I'll hide it in the special secret place I've chosen and peek at it now and then. I must inform you that I've already read it, cover to cover, and although some of the material was a bit ... much ... it certainly wasn't boring. I particularly admire the cover. Mrs. Jones is an artist of rare quality, delving into the essence of one's being and putting one's soul on paper. I am a great admirer of that lady's work, and I look forward to your next cover — even if Uncle Jim doesn't have as good a physique as my father. That's another thing: I object strongly to the theory that my dad and Uncle Jim have engaged in a homosexual relationship. They're friends, not lovers, and it's because of Ms. Fish's outstanding story "Poses" that I must hide the OBSC'ZINE when it arrives. Although it was well-written, absorbing and, if one were to accept the premise, quite believable, my grandfather would not approve, and most likely would forbit any further association on my part with humans. So, therefore, I'll hide it. I've got the perfect spot, too: under the stack of 'zines called IDIC Peace and long life, Sahaj [20]

Issue 2

front cover of issue #2, Alice Jones
back cover of issue #2

Obsc'zine 2 was published in August 1977 and has 100 pages. Back cover: Gordon Carleton. On the cover: "Entertainment for Humanoids." Artwork by Alice Jones, Gordon Carleton, Susan Ceci, Gayle F, Jane Firmstone, Leslie Fish, Phil Foglio, Signe Landon, Nan Lewis, Doug Rice, V.M. Wyman, and Bev Zuk.

This issue printed a number of LoCs, mostly pertaining to the first issue. The editor also lists 55 names in the WAHF section.

This issue contains what many consider one of the earliest femslash stories published in a media zine: "Kismet," by Dani Morin.[21]

Contents:

Comments Regarding K/S: Issue 2

There were a number of LoCs in issue #2 about the K/S Premise. Some excerpts:

...with Grup, R & R, Alternative and other such porno 'zines, there seems to be an increase in demand of these ‘zines. As I’ve said, it’s the art I find somewhat objectionable. I’m sure the female readers are drawn toward the nude sketches of Kirk and Spock, as the men probably are of Uhura, Chapel, etc., but let’s face it, these drawings aren’t stimulating (how can a person be stimulated by a drawing?), and they certainly don’t take the place of Playboy and the like. So, why include so many nude illos? Sure some of the pieces of art are illustrations of scenes in the stories, but must virtually every piece of art depict a lurid sex act? Also, I’ve found that these stories lack any semblance of a plot. Why can’t the sexual goings-on be intertwined with some sort of story? Just describing, in a detailed manner, sexual acts, seems a little tacky.
...With regard to the possibility of a Kirk-Spock relationship...On Earth, as species become more intelligent, their sexual urges become more generalized and less bound by instinct....

If Vulcans were strictly bound by instinct in partner selection, Spock would not exist, and there would be no need for the extensive rituals surrounding pon farr (you don’t ritualize breathing). If Vulcans were strictly monogamous, T’Pring would not have looked at anyone else, once bonded to Spock.

If one assumes that Vulcans 1) consider sexual intercourse not accompanied by telepathic bonding (or deep linking) to be perversion, 2) consider deliberate attempts to prevent conception to be murder, blasphemy, perversion, etc., 3) are ordinarily (except at pon farr) much less interested in sex than humans are due to hormonal changes, cultural conditioning and the traumatic nature of the experience of pon farr on individuals and on society, and 4) are a less social species than humans are, with a greater need for privacy and solitude and a much larger normal personal space, it is possible to account for all known Vulcan behavioral patterns and also possible to state that it is quite possible for Spock to be less hung up by a relationship than Kirk would be. Spock would probably not spontaneously go beyond a telepathic union, but once a bond had been established, physical reinforcement of it could well be considered valid (eccentric, perhaps, but not perverted). Promiscuity would be considered much worse than a stable homosexual union, provided one’s reproductive and marital responsibilities were not avoided....

Spock would have trouble dealing with the establishment of an acknowledged bond with Kirk, Kirk would have trouble dealing with the ‘homosexual’ aspects of the situation...but might be able to deal with a telepathic/emotion bond only in terms of sexuality...
...My second objection is to the idea that homosexuality is an illness. We do not know that it is. Yes, it is an aberrant behavior, but then, so is being an sf fan, and I do not consider myself sick because sf and ST fascinate me.

My third objection: why do we assume that heterosexuality is the way of the future? Gays are more accepted now than they ever have been before.... Who can say that two centuries from now it won’t be encouraged? Given overpopulation on certain planets, it may become necessary.

...It is not difficult to imagine Kirk and Spock as lovers.... a friendship as thorough as theirs may find expression in sexuality the only way to communicate their mutual love and trust. The first time I ran across this theme, I found it beautiful and believable....
...‘Shelter’ was everything I had been led to expect—a beautifully-written, tender story, done with compassion and understanding. The scene where Spock confesses his love and Kirk accepts him was really lovely. The only slight criticism is a vague uneasiness at McCoy’s being turned into a reluctant Peeping-Tom, but it didn’t spoil the story. ‘Poses’ followed on naturally. Having accepted Spock out of love initially, Kirk finds he has been sexually aroused by him. His hesitation at abandoning his image, and Spock’s reluctance to drop his Super-Vulcan pose, their mutual misunderstanding of each other’s reactions were wholly credible. More sex-based than ‘Shelter,’ it nevertheless conveyed the love perfectly....
...Sorry. Perhaps I’m just too much of a thoroughly heterosexual female, but these gay stories turn me completely off. It’s more than just a dislike on my part. It seems to me to be a total mischaracterization. In ST we were clearly shown two well-adjusted, heterosexual males in Kirk and Spock, and these stories seem to be perverting their characters. What is all this interest in homo-stuff, anyway? Some of the stories, I must admit, are well-written, and my comments do not necessarily reflect on the author’s writing abilities. Take ‘Poses’ for example. Leslie Fish can write a good story, and make it interesting, but the basic premise of the story is just a bit too much. To paraphrase someone—not only may the Kirk/Spock premise rest in peace, may it also rest in pieces—very tiny pieces. I can only hope you don’t have much, if any, of these gay stories next time around. Maybe this fad will soon run its course...
...I wasn’t going to gush about ‘Shelter’ and ‘Poses’...but it seems appropriate because Fish and Agostino show great psychological insight in these stories and express in fictional form the importance of integration. Spock has repressed a whole chunk of his total personality, but then so has Kirk. In Kirk’s case, however, what has been repressed is his ‘feminine’ side. To hold to his super-macho, ‘Jim, the Galactic Hero’ image he has denied a part of himself that cannot be denied without cost. Human beings are basically androgynous, a fact which Fish/Agostino understand very well, and the humanization of James Kirk is as important an element in the Kirk-Spock relationship stories as the change in Spock. Basically, each is helping the other along toward that integration of personality they both need.

...We hear about all different kinds of love—friendship, sexual love, love of family— between and among people, but I don’t think we’re talking about different things, only different manifestations of the same thing, and the boundaries which separate those manifestations are amorphous, weak and can easily become nonexistent. I think any kind of love relationship carries sexual potential; whether or not that potential becomes actualized depends on all manner of variables in conditioning, environment, etc.

...Plenty of people besides myself have no trouble at all accepting a Kirk-Spock relationship of the kind described in ‘Poses.’ Anita Bryant notwithstanding, I find it hard to believe that a 22nd Century person, exposed to the variety of a galaxy-wide culture, won’t be many times more liberal in these matters....

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 2

See reactions and reviews for But Can He Type?.
See reactions and reviews for Bridle for a Nightmare.
See reactions and reviews for The Kama Vulca.
See reactions and reviews for Solstice.
See reactions and reviews for There Goes Paradise.
See reactions and reviews for Kismet.
See reactions and reviews for The Easy Way Out.
See reactions and reviews for Up for the Honeymoon.
[zine]: I found this second issue a much broader and more balanced production than the first issue had been. The cover, an Alice Jones Kirk nude, is the best answer I've seen to one LoC inside that objected to smutty pictures -- it is erotic without being pornographic. The fiction: 'Bridle for a Nightmare' was an exceptionally powerful sequel to her Bones horror story in the previous issue. A strong beginning helps make up for a rather weak ending. Nice characterizations, nice plotting, nice scientific and historical details, nice writing. There is a cycle of pon farr articles, both interesting in themselves and thought provoking. An erotic Kirk portfolio, with illos and interps by respectively: Zuk, Fish, Wyman, Landon, Lewis and Smith, block, Faddis is curiously mixed. The best is a haunting free-style poem by Paula Smith, 'Bound.' 'Up for the Honeymoon' by Paula Block is not recommended for Sadie fans. Nice sex, no story. Lovely illos by Foglio, though. 'The Kama Vulcan' by Paula Smith is a great parody. 'Solstice' by Firmstone is a pleasant Mary Sue. 'Kismet' is a gentle ironic short short and well worth it. 'There Goes Paradise' is a well-written and lusciously illoed by Alice Jones post-'The Apple' story, but it doesn't live up to its title. And there are some amusing parodies by Lym, Lubkin, Kmetyk, and Rene.[23]
[zine]: OBSC'ZINE #2, edited by Lori Chapek-Carleton, was published August 1977. Its 100 type-reduced pages contain a nude Kirk cover by Alice Jones (disappointingly flat and asexual though he has a nice expression); LoC's concerning K/S and homosexuality, an article on K/S, an "Erotic Kirk Portfolio", "The Pon Farr Articles", "The Kama Vulcan", five short stories, seven vignettes, seven poems plus many limericks and humorous verse; illos, including halftones, by [Gayle F], Fish, Landon, Lewis, Wyraan, Zuk, Ceci, Jones, Firmstone, and cartoons by Doug Rice, Phil Foglio, and Gordon Carleton, who also did the back cover poster, "Starfleet Wants You!" with a nude crewwoman—All this for $3.50, in the Good Old Days. Now, even the xeroxes cost more. Unfortunately, there really aren't any K/S stories. Johanna Cantor's "There Goes Paradise" is a post-"The Apple" story concerning Makora and Sayana learning of sex by observing Martha and Chekov, and by doing a lot of experimenting. It uses a rather clinical approach for such a light topic. Paula Block's silly and self-apologetic "Up the for Honeymoon" is a one of the "Sadie Faulwell" stories, which details her honeymoon with McCoy. Jane Firmstone's "Solstice" is a soddenly romantic Ensign Mary Sue story, told in treacly flashback reminiscences by the Old Married Mary. Ugh! Lora Rene's "The Big E Meets the Big O of The Ultimate Trek Tail" is this issue's obligatory "orgy on the Enterprise" story. Everyone on the ship stops working and starts fucking in as large groups as possible. Spock suspects the influence of some Alien Force. He is right. A Disembodied Voice informs him that she needs the psychosexual energy generated by everyone fucking at once in a giant daisy chain in order to create a new Star Trek universe. Unless Spock cooperates, she threatens to turn the ship into a "Fucking Dutchman", traveling through space forever, humping away.... Spock believes her. He collects all the crew into a huge circular hallway on the ship, all humping merrily. But the Voice of the Writer informs him that he must join the daisy chain to make it complete. He does so reluctantly, but concludes that: "In the annals of history, this may be the first time that a Vulcan's participation in the sex act is, indeed, thelogical thing to do!" The longest story, Elizabeth Clair's "Bridle for a Nightmare", is an interesting tale wherein McCoy inadvertantly discovers the way (a kiss) to open a stasis field discovered by the Enterprise, and thereby releases the Lamia. The female creature controls him and tortures him, bringing horrible perverted dreams of sex and death. Eventually, he accidentally kills the creature. Ignorant of what has been going on, Kirk and Spock conduct a hearing on McCoy's responsibility for the murder, and "Bridle..." rather confusingly begins with his testimony at this hearing. He is, of course, exonerated, but he still is badly disturbed, has trauma neuroses, terrible nightmares, and is afraid of sex and of women. But a friendly colleague, a psychiatrist named Beatrice, helps him recreate and reshape his dream experiences with the aid of a special tricorder she calls a "dream shaper". She helps him through the violent and painful dreams, leading him to considered, positive action, letting him control his own dream-experiences, then helps him return to sexual experience—with herself. He is finally able to sleep dreamlessly and is cured. Several of the vignettes and poems hold more interest for the K/S fan. There are two very good Ellen Kobrin poems. "And When They Awoke, No Longer Posing" is a sequel of sorts to Leslie Fish's "Poses". And there is an untitled poem, beginning: "O my friend, I cannot make myself / Believe that we are lovers at last." Both are literate and ecstatic. Humorous poems and limericks—some not half-bad—are plentiful. "I Dream of Jimmy", by "Stepan Fester", concludes: "Oh! I sigh for Jimmy with the light brown hair— /Once the Maiden's delight; now the Vulcan's despair." (How true, one suspects!) Luba Kmetyk's "Friendship and Obligation" is a vignette, one of those apres-sex scenes featuring surprise bed-partners. It concludes: "Shaking his companion awake, he ((Spock)) whispered, 'Bones, do you think Jim suspects?"' Kismet", by Dani Morin, the lovers are Uhura and Chapel. They make love, then laugh about how Chapel obfuscates their relationship by supposedly mooning over the perennially unavailable Spock. And they laugh about a rumor they heard that Kirk and Spock are lovers—but neither really believes it is true. One of Nan Lewis's best illo, a small one of Uhura and Chapel, accompanies the vignette. The "Kama Vulcan" is a kind of flippant parody of the Kama Sutra, with the "Master" instructing the "Student" in pon farr techniques. It could have been done much better, but there are a few good lines, and a few fair cartoons, such as the Vulcan wife watching Johnny Carson on TV, while her agonized husband is having sex with her, perspiringly. Ruth Kwitko Lyra's "The Literary Biological Imperative" is another "Writer-Controlling-the-Crew" story. When Spock goes into pon farr yet again, and has to leave the bridge, Kirk complains, "Helluva way to run a starship.... Some guys have all the luck!" And there is the clever "Subspace Message Printout" ordering Spock to report to Sickbay for inspection and servicing by the Chief Nurse, in compliance with Ship's Operating Regulations, Chapter 7. It is signed by McCoy, and his comment is appended: "Just try to get out of this one, Spocko!" "The Pon Farr Articles" contain various fan's theories of that condition, including one vignette/sex scene with Spock and a Vulcan woman, notable for being illustrated by Gayle F. There is a gorgeous, very muscular standing nude with erect cock, and two other illos beautifully designed which, include the woman. In "The Erotic Kirk Portfolio", there is an enticing Leslie Fish illo of Kirk, with clothes ripped off, being sold as a slave on the auction block, held by an Amazon. Paula Smith's interpretation, "But Can He Type?" is worthy of note. Kirk is held captive by slave merchants on the polyandric planet, to which he tried to act as Federation ambassador, and is casually raped by his Amazon guard. He is not rescued. He tries to escape, but is returned to the slave merchant, "sold to a painted, perfumed debauchee, who managed a few good times off him before he simply had to be destroyed." Other illos and interpretations include a disappointing menage a trois with Kirk, an alien cat and a woman (a terrible poem). A lovely nude Kirk foldout by V.M. Wyman is interpreted by Paula Smith with a vignette concerning how Kirk manages to avoid participating in a local planetary custom—that of ritually deflowering a frightened girl-child. A vignette by Connie Faddis interprets a rather vaguely sketchy nude Kirk in billowing cape, drawn by Signe Landon. Kirk must pass into a plane of unreality—must actually die for a brief time—in order to contact an alien presence from some other plane of existence, in order to convince the alien that its probes are causing havoc and deaths in our galaxy, and persuade it to leave. Kirk succeeds, but is too weak to return. Spock pulls him back mentally, and they narrowly avoid permanent death. He returns to the pressure of Spock's hand, and smiles up at him from the Sickbay bed. "Bound", a K/S poem by Paula Smith, accompanies a lovely illo by Nan Lewis of a crumpled Spock at Kirk's feet; Kirk is turning away (sadly, he looks far too wide-hipped and effeminate). It is Kirk's complaint in the aftermath of pon farr which resulted in sex and consequent bonding with Spock that he has been "entangled" in Spock's terrible biology, becoming "this hungry, cold, unhuman being, Forsaking touch... Now, all / You will allow rae—with luck, twice in / Ten years." And concludes, "Before God, I hate you for it." It was to have a very good sequel-poem, a rebuttal by Spock, in a later issue of OBSC/ZINE. There is probably less K/S in this issue of OBSC'ZINE than in any other issue—but at least it is 100% Star Trek, free from the unwanted intrusion of other media material, particularly Star Wars, which would come in later issues.[24]
[zine]: Although the average quality of thish is higher than that of OBS I, ish II is a bit of a letdown. There's no spectacularly good story here, nothing like "A Lesson in Perspective" or "Shelter" or "Poses" to take off the top of your head and stir your brain around a little. Not that there aren't quite a few goodies. Elizabeth Clair's "Bridle for a Nightmare", a sequel to "Bitter Dreams", is clearly the zine's best of- fering. It is smoothly written and well-characterized; the lady doctor who helps McCoy over his trauma is definitely not a Mary Sue. The heroines of Marcia Mathog's "Pon Far" and Jane Firrnstone's "Solstice", unfortunately, are just that: T'Lea and Sarah are totally indistinguishable from a hundred or a thousand other fanfic females whose goal in life is to lay one of the Big E's senior officers. "There Goes Paradise" is a pleasant post-"Apple" story, executed with Joanna Cantor's usu- al degree of craftsmanship. Paula Block brings the Faulwell saga to a close with "Up For the Honeymoon"; if you like the series, you'll like this. Lora Rene's "The Big E meets the Big O... " is thish's obligatory shipwide-orgy spoof; this gimmick is beginning to wear thin, and it is to be hoped that this instance is indeed the ultimate such Trektale. (True, it is a scream. But.) "Kismet" is arch porno --no characterization, no real examination of its subject matter. The "Erotic Kirk Portfolio" is beautifully drawn, but since four of the five drawings are interpreted by Paula Smith, there is a certain--given Paula's Ellisonesque affinities--depressing and rather bizarre sameness to the presentation. A little more variety next time, please. There are also a number of well thought out and intriguing articles on the whys and wherefores of pon farr, and the usual limericks and such. Smith's "Kama Vulca" is hilarious. Art throughout ranges mostly from very fine to knock- your-eyes out, though there are a couple of real disasters. On the whole, entertainment for humanoids remains--entertaining. Recommended.[25]
[zine]: it's a very sensitive and extremely youthful cover drawing ... I agree completely with [Edith C] in her remarks about 200 year changes in human sexual mores. Though it is always dangerous to generalize about ST fandom ages, most readers have at least observed what happened in the turbulent and sexy 60's, an incredibly far cry from my teen years of the 30's as far as permissiveness and publicly acceptable subject matter are concerned. Homosexuality can never be stuffed back into the closet, and its future lies primarily in general society’s attitudinal changes, sure to occur if TV bravely faces up to its leadership role. Consequently male-female social roles will continue to blur, thank God, permitting humans to realize their full potential in each area. Of course K and S could love sexually as well as Platonically, with the former growing naturally out of the latter as a result of their complementing each other’s personalities and bodies...
[zine]: I read through OBSC'ZINE and was both impressed and a bit disappointed. I think it's probably just me and that you are giving the public what it wants to read, but it's not really the sort of thing I like. I was disappointed at not finding a really strongly plotted story. The stories were either simple bedroom scenes or short vignettes. Even the McCoy story which, on first sight, looked long enough to have some meat on it (what am image!) turned out to be no more than a well-written series of sexual encounters. I must be getting old or something. The first fine careless rapture is wearing off and I find I'm getting bored with titillating descriptions of the sex act. Every now and then I come across one that can still excite, like "Poses", but for the most part I find myself thinking "Not again". It's a bit the same with the artwork. There's tremendous technical skill and talent there but it's all dreadfully samey. (Is there such a word?) Is it possible to have too much of a good thing? I wonder if I can bear another nude of Kirk or Spock. Don't get me wrong — I'm not criticising you or your contributors. It's just the whole scene wearing a bit thin. I'm finding the same with GROPE. Nobody's writing stories any more — just excerpting the sexy bits. When every illustration is a nude and when every story is a sexual encounter the

balance of any 'zine must be adversely affected. Is there any future for the "adult" zine as such? Or will this inbalanace eventually kill it off? I, personally, find WARPED SPACE much more interesting (Don't stop sending me OBSC'ZINE, though — I'm not that bored. And I'd hate to miss another Leslie Fish or [Gayle F] delightful bit of erotica.) I keep getting reminded of the mythical creature who went round in ever decreasing circles till he disappeared up his own fundamental oriface! I can somehow visualise that happening to us. Perhaps it's time to start writing the sort of story where most of the action is above the waist! I used to think that people wrote what they themselves wanted to read. Which seems to indicate that most people are perfectly happy with a series of get-togethers since I presume that the only reason you have not printed a story with an interesting plot is that you have not had any submitted. Be that as it may.

To sum up: the artwork was mostly great, especially [Gayle F's], the stories were well written, the quality of layout and printing was, as usual, excellent. Yet I found the whole thing only mildly entertaining — and suspect the fault must lie with me. I'm just a bit jaded. Have to keep telling myself that it's not reason able to expect originality all the time.
[zine]: I figured out why I think OB 2 is better than OB 1 — there are more stories with something of a plot, other than the excuse to get two characters — or the whole ship, for that matter — into bed together. I'm afraid I grow rapidly bored of sex-for-sex's-sake stories; you can only read so much of it before it begins to pall badly, and far too many "adult" stories have that problem. If you don't have good characters or a good plot, it's very hard to become involved with anything

in the story, at least for me, and the sex ends up being mechanical. Not particularly titillating, even — even the characters don't seem to be enjoying them selves sometimes, but that may be because the reader doesn't know enough about the character of the situation to know if someone is having a good time, unless the characters are Christine and Spock, in which case the pre-existing plot lends an extra dimension to the story. The same with the Faulwell story in this issue — by itself it's fairly slight, and were it not for the background of the rest of the series, it would not have a whole lot of meaning; but because of all the other Faulwell stories, it has a certain meaning and enjoyability that it would otherwise not have. (But please, it's not the end of the series?) The limericks were generally cute, and so were the assorted reproduction jokes — which I didn't even see until halfway through the zine, at which point I went back and read the ones I'd missed. "Solstice" — well, methinks that was a Mary Sue. And also that Kirk would not be so enchanted with an inexperienced young woman. But you never know. Nice fantasy.

... One thing that seemed to run through the pon farr articles, and also throughout the thought of Trekdom in general on the subject: that Vulcans can only do it every seven years, according to "Amok Time". Now upon reviewing that episode and Spock's comments in "The Cloud Minders", I seem to find that nowhere does anyone say anything about only every seven years. At least every seven years, yes, when you have this little hormone imbalance, but that does not imply necessarily that nothing occurs in between times. And Spock neatly avoided the question in "The Cloud Minders." Maybe Spock's first time was so bad because it was the first time — some of the extreme reactions might have been culturally induced in order to ensure that the male gets married at all if the Vulcan sex drive is low. In effect, physical propaganda. Or maybe the first time is bad because puberty hits all at once, instead of relatively gradually. It certainly seemed to be Spock's puberty — and he didn't seem particularly sexually backwards afterwards — in comparison to certain people aboard the Big E, yes, but still, there were those implications. And has anyone else ever noticed that the Stardate for "This Side of Paradise" is later than that of "Amok Time", in fact immediately later, by about seven dates (days, whatever)? Another speculation: even if Spock's pon farr was not dissipated by the emotional shock of "killing" Kirk, he did not die of it because the incident with Leila happened immediately thereafter, and may have served not only to dissipate the pon farr but to properly introduce Spock to the joys of sex — hence his relaxation later and his apparent openness to the charms of some females. In fact the Vulcans — or at least Spock — still may not know whether great emotional shock will dissipate the pon farr.
[zine]: OBSC'ZINE #2 was even better than #1 (except, of course, that "Poses" is secure in its position as number one story). To digress — is there going to be a sequel? Lots of sequels? A whole series? Please say yes. Make Leslie Fish say yes. Beg. Lots of questions present themselves, and Leslie has the psychological insight and writing skill to answer them in away I'd l like to see. Examples: who else in the crew finds out? What are their reactions? What does Star Fleet think of this sort of thing — what happens if they find out? How does Kirk explain his sudden change in habits (i.e., no more carousing)? Does he change his habits, in fact, and how hard is it for him if he does? How hard is it for Spock if he has trouble doing it? What happens when and if Amanda finds out? And does the shit hit the fan when Sarek finds out? The possibilities ...
[zine]: In the LoC column a guy named [Steve E] informed us that adult zines are rendered "smutty" by "graphic illustrations" and therefore a good adult zine should have none. He cites the drawings as not being "stimulating". He can't have it both ways — either he wants the zines free of "graphic illustrations" or he wants these illustrations to be "stimulating", is that it? ("The food here is so bad — and in such small portions.") I think the illustrations are fantastic breeding grounds (you should pardon the expression) for such talented artists as [Gayle F], Downes, Landon, etc. And in his letter, [Mr. E] bemoans the constant depiction of "lurid sex acts". I'd like to know what zine he's been reading; I haven't seen too many lurid sex acts in the OBSC'ZINEs. But maybe I've been looking in all the wrong places ...
[zine]:
  • The Literary Biological Imperative / Kirk is becoming disgruntled with Spock's incessant duties of pon farr at zine authors' behests.
  • Memo / from McCoy to Spock, demanding that he report for routine maintenance by Chapel.
  • Friendship and Obligation / Short-short of Spock and partner fearing discovery by their friend... the twist is that his partner is McCoy.
  • Bridle for a Nightmare / This was a fun one - suspenseful, erotic, witty and sweet. McCoy has (inadvertently) killed an alien; in the hearing, he reveals that she had been giving him gruesome but erotic nightmares in which he dies after or during sex with her. He is acquitted but can't get rid of the nightmares until a female colleague forces him into therapy under a hypno-gizmo that projects the dreams so that he can change them. Dream 1: he rescues a drowning woman who then kills him; this time he kills her instead - and wakes having ejaculated and worried about seeing himself as a sex-killer. Dream 2: he is lured into sex on a sacrificial altar and she cuts his heart out; he manages to break the knife, then rapes her, waking to another orgasm and now disturbed that he has these rape fantasies. Dream 3: a harem girl lures him to bed then cuts his head off when the sultan comes back; this time he escapes to safety on a horse, taking her with him, and he ends it by making tender and skillful love to her, achieving his cure. On waking he realizes that he was in fact fondling the therapist; they decide to "try for four."
  • The Big E Meets the Big O, or, The Ultimate Trek Tail / Pretty funny little romp; zine author requires the entire crew to orgasm together to give her the energy to create a new universe. Spock has to round up a bunch of orgies into one big orgy - and then join in.
  • Pon Farr Articles / Articles on the biology of pon farr
  • Erotic Kirk Portfolio - illos with interpretations
  • But Can He Type / Kirk auctioned as sex slave... until he has to be destroyed.
  • The Ballad of Jim, Max and Floo / limericks re Kirk, cat & sex.
  • Virgin Territory / Paula Smith - Kirk is required to deflower a 12-year-old princess. Nicely done.
  • A Third Lazarus / Kirk dies for four minutes to contact invaders from another plane.
  • Bound / Poem. A new take on the Vulcan bonding - Kirk has bonded with Spock to save him in pon farr and now finds that he, too, is only capable of sex every seven years, and the loss fills him hate for Spock.
  • Up for the Honeymoon / Faulwell story. McCoy and Sadie are newly wed, but McCoy is recovering from a recent myocardial infarction, so Sadie decides to take things into her own hands - and mouth. Paula's usual fine characterization & dialogue.
  • The Kama Vulcan / Well, ya gotta be in the mood for puns for this one... but if you are, it's a hoot.
  • Solstice / Kirk's wife (of 30 years) Sarah reminisces over their first night together.
  • The Easy Way Out / Article encouraging fans to create female characters to match Kirk & Spock, rather than matching them to each other.
  • Kismet / Uhura and Chapel, lovers, speculate on the gossip that Kirk and Spock are, too. (Nice point that Chapel's infatuation with Spock is a cover for her true love.
  • There Goes Paradise / Makora and Sayanna (The Apple) take lessons on "the touching" from Chekov and Martha - but Sayanna finds it hurts. Uhura to the rescue, with some lube. Nicely written, rather believable sequel to the episode. [26]

Issue 3

back cover of issue #3, Gordon Carleton -- the dedication: "For Alice"
front cover of issue #3, Alice Jones

Obsc'zine 3 was published in May 1978 and has 98 pages. Cover: Alice Jones; back cover: Gordon Carleton. Art & illustrations: Cordon Carleton, Jean C., Edith Crowe, Diana Empey, C.R. Faddis, Gayle F, Leslie Fish, Elyse M. Grasso, Alice Jones, Signe Landon, Carrie Rowles, Virginia Lee Smith, Susan Wyllie, Anji Valenza.

It contains, in an LOC by Juanita Salicrup, one of the earliest uses of the term "K/S." [1]

From the editorial:
First off, this will be brief, as I really don't have much to say. I do apologize for the extreme lateness of this issue as I realize the OBSC'ZINEs are supposed to come out four times quarterly and have been coming out at something like half that rate. The OBSC'ZINE #4 will be printed in August, and I'll try to get out four issues per year from then on. I'm also in somewhat of a quandary in that I think I've typed an awful lot of material for this issue, and I have a sneaking suspicion it won't all fit in this issue. So, if any of you authors don't find your stories in these pages, once again I apologize. They'll go in OB 4, and that's another reason I'll get the next issue out real soon now.... On the matter of censorship, pornography, and what this 'zine contains — if you don't care for homosexual Kirk/ Spock stories — beware, as this issue does contain several. By no means is OB devoted exclusively to that theme, but I only print what people send me, and what people want to read. Some of the stories in this issue are written purely for fun. some are (probably) shocking, and some are serious, thoughtful pieces. Some are written only as "lay"-somebody stories, some actually have a plot. I don't apologize for the contents of this 'zine; I think an "adults-only M warning should warn off potentially-offended people adequately. Read all these stories with a grain of salt, and if some provoke you to serious thought, or make you laugh, or otherwise affect you. they will have served their purpose.

Contents:

  • Editorial (4)
  • Ni Var: Memories by Elyse M. Grasso (5)
  • Rite de Passage by Susan K. James (5)
  • A Vulcan Dream by Donna McIntosh (11) (K/S. The two have erotic dreams of one another, turning dream into reality.)
  • The Captain's Dream by Donna McIntosh (12) (K/S. The two have erotic dreams of one another, turning dream into reality.)
  • Between Friends by Gayle F (4th in a series. 1. "Desert Heat", in The Sensuous Vulcan; 2. "Beyond Setarcos" in Thrust; 3. "Night of the Dragon", in Thrust) (14)
  • * Cosmic Fuck Chorus (filk to Yesterday) by Melanie R. (32)
  • For Anita Bryant Fans, or, Kirk and Spock Get Theirs (33)
  • After Paradise by Anne Elizabeth Zeek (33)
  • Halcyon: to Miramanee by Andrina Lewis (Kirk on the death of Kirok, as well as Miramanee) (35)
  • A Time of Birth by Elyse M. Grasso (First section "Nemuzuth -- the Juggler" printed in Tetrumbriant #12. "A later section" - "Sedhozheh" printed in Warped Space #31-32) (35)
  • Oriana, Part 4: "The Lovers" by Roberta Rogow (Part 1, "The Investigation" in Warped Space #25; Part 2, "The Invasion" in Warped Space #26-27; Part 3, "The Rebellion" in Warped Space #28; Parts 5-7 "will be printed in future Warped Space issues.")(Former Starfleet officer, now Queen of Andorria, Bethan skips her diplomatic duties to indulge in a sexual interlude with dashing—but married—Semorn. Then Semorn's wife is found dead under suspicious circumstances and Bethan orders Semorn to go away—back to his pirating if he must—until she sends for him.) (52)
  • B'Yadu by Cardian Wedgett (61)
  • A Peaceful Shore Leave by Karen Klink (74) (Kirk spends shore leave with an attractive Klingon—all as a set up for a pun punchline.)
  • Sarek and Amanda and Kirk and Spock by Jean Borrah (Jean Lorrah, writing under a humorous pseud) (In May 1979, Lorrah wrote about plans for a new book called Savage Empire and said it "will be the first in a series (what else?), and the second thing I've written that developed from a title. (For trivia fans, the first was the humorous "Sarek and Amanda and Kirk and Spock." Someone made that up as a parody-title for an NTM-universe story, and I couldn't resist supplying the story to go with it. It's in The Obsc'zine #3." [27]) (75)
  • The Pit by Mariann Hornlein (Kirk and Spock are trapped in a pit, Kirk with a sprained ankle and Spock delirious from snake venom. Spock sees Kirk as T'Pring and rapes him.) (76)
  • Feelthy Limerics (80)
  • Letter to a Friend by Sue Donym (82)
  • All in the Mind by Toni Cardinal-Price (An innuendo-riddled set-up, Kirk insists to Spock that they've waited too long already... for Spock's haircut.) (84)
  • Carnal Comments (letters) (89)
  • Light Talk by L. Morales (89)
  • Portfolio: (art) An Alien Erotica by Virginia Lee Smith

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 3

See reactions and reviews for B'Yadu.
See reactions and reviews for Rite de Passage.
See reactions and reviews for Between Friends.
[zine]: Several good pieces, several poor to fair. "Rite of Passage' struck me as a rather over-written and unnecessary story (and Leslie Fish obviously did not read the story very closely). I also actively disliked 'B'Yadu' though the idea is somewhat intriguing. On the other hand, I enjoyed 'A Time of Birth' although some people have found her series somewhat hard to read. And of course, there is the fourth of [Gayle F's] Cosmic Fuck series -- 'Between Friends,' with non-graphic (explicit) illos by Faddis followed by [Melanie R's] delightful filk of the Cosmic Fuck Chorus. And there is a Sarek and Amanda and Kirk and Spock in a neatly done parody, ouch!. One minor warning, Lori had better watch it with some of the cartoons she printed if what is said about George Lucas is true -- no x-rated SW stuff allowed! However, Gordon's back cover, 'For Alice,' of one of the CE3K aliens is absolutely priceless. This ish? Average.[28]
[zine]:
  • Between Friends / [4th in a series. 1. "Desert Heat", in Sensuous Vulcan; 2. "Beyond Setarcos" in Thrust; 3. "Night of the Dragon", in Thrust] Fine, vivid writing here. McCoy has been rescued from a long captivity but can't seem to drag himself back to life. Kirk and Spock have a plan to take care of that. 'Nuff said, draw curtain. Nice combination of hurt/comfort and orgy.
  • For Anita Bryant Fans, or, Kirk and Spock Get Theirs / Zap! says, God. Or someone.
  • A Time of Birth / Part of an elaborate "translation" of an otherworld epic, the "Puvo Nemuzathkuch dhidDojosmelu, or, Narrative of the Demonborn Juggler," not apparently Trek-related. First section "Nemuzuth -- the Juggler" printed in Tetrumbriant #12. "A later section" - "Sedhozheh" printed in Warped Space #31/32.
  • Oriana, Part 4: "The Lovers" / [Part 1, "The Investigation" in Warped Space #25; Part 2, "The Invasion" in Warped Space #26/27; Part 3, "The Rebellion" in Warped Space #28; Parts 5-7 "will be printed in future Warped Space issues."] Andorrian Bethan, formerly of Starfleet, now Regent of Andorria, tires of her bureaucratic duties and indulges in a little idyll with ex-pirate Semorn before sending him away on suspicion of murdering his estranged wife.
  • B'Yadu / As a result of some conveniently mysterious galactic phenomenon, a pre-reform Vulcan woman has ended up on the Enterprise at an inconvenient time in her cycle. She decides on the captain as the alpha male, but he proves insufficient, and she resorts to the apparently distasteful modern Vulcan. McCoy catches on when she turns out to be pregnant with twins. Amusing.
  • A Peaceful Shore Leave / Kirk gives it all to improve Federation / Klingon relations.
  • Sarek and Amanda and Kirk and Spock / Cute double-entendre vignette.
  • The Pit / Grim hurt-comfort when an envenomed Spock hallucinates that Kirk is the woman who rejected him - and treats him accordingly.
  • Letter to a Friend / Crewman's letter recounting his new love interest on the Enterprise. [29]

Issue 4

Obsc'zine #4 front cover, Beverly Zuk, nominated for a Fan Q
back cover of issue #4, Gayle F. Note: This image has been marked as sexually explicit and has been minimised.

Obsc'zine 4 was published in November 1980 and has 103 pages. Cover: Beverly Zuk; back cover: Gayle F. A pull-out piece of art by Pat Stall. Other art by V.M. Wyman, Joni Wagner, Pat Stall, Virginia Lee Smith, Susan Perry-Smith, Martynn, Fa Maki, Nan Lewis, Alice Jones, Phil Fogio, Leslie Fish and Gordon Carleton.

One notable contribution to this issue was Cross Currents by Marion Zimmer Bradley, the second Star Trek fanzine story that she wrote.[30]

In the editorial, Capek-Carleton notes its been about two years since the last issue, and that she still plans to put out fifth one (February/March 1980) and lists the contributions she already has: poetry by Melissa Bayard, Carol Nevins and Frankie Jemison, ST fiction by Ala Lysistrata, Jelica Raylle, and Dunya Douglas, SW fiction by L.A. Robinson, Paula Block and Judi L. Hendricks, and art by Frank Panucci, Doug Rice, and Randy Ash. "This is only the stuff that was pushed out of issue #4!"

The editor comments on content:
In the two years between issues, there seems to be sort of a conservative backlash concerning sexuality. I've had people comment to me that they don't care for gay stories, and several people at my printers (who are female!) have told me they consider 'Obsc'zine' sexist. I take no stand for or against Kirk/Spock, and do defend a zine's right to print just about any kind of material, but the latter comment absolutely floored me. 'Obsc'zine' sexist? When 90 to 99% of it is written, illustrated, and read by females? Sigh. Perhaps the comment was made only because we had a naked female on the last cover. I will admit that I do get embarrassed sometimes when taking certain illustrations down to be screened or reduced, but I'm not ashamed to include the same in the zine. I'm just modest. In any case, comments? Are explicit illustrations too raunchy? Should certain types of stories be forbidden? Personally, I don't care much for S&M, and unfortunately, I see some leanings in that direction in submissions to other zines. Are people who consider themselves feminist more liberal than those who don't? Are women more or less embarrassed by lesbian than by gay stories? Is there a fresher topic in the adult zine world than K/S?
art from issue #4, Virginia Lee Smith, for the story "The Pendulum". Note: Marked for sexual assault/rape; minimized.

Contents:

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 4

See reactions and reviews for Cross Currents.
See reactions and reviews for The Pendulum.
See reactions and reviews for For A' That.
[zine]: Obsc'zine' #4 followed issue #3 after a two-year hiatus, presumbly pushed to a back burner by the 103 other projects Lori Chapek-Carleton is involved with. In the past, 'Obsc'zine' has been THE place to find writers trying to top each other for explicitness and the most outrageous topics imaginable. As the editor herself notes in her editorial, there seems to have been a backswing towards moderation in the stories submitted. Tigriffin suspects the stories presented here measure the extent of the ohter extreme in 'adult' material -- at least half feature non-explicit sex or sex by implication. It will be interesting to see issue #5 and find out which way the pendulum is swinging. 'Jiggle': technology advances, but human nature stays the same. A cute, well-crafted account on the perils of using a bust developer on a deepspace tour. 'Paradise Regained': In 'The Apple,' Kirk concluded the people of Vaal knew nothing about sexual reproduction. According to the events of this story, he was jumping to conclusions again. 'UFP Guide to Sex': ribald verse and illos by Carleton, which would go over quite well read aloud at certain parties. 'Mythology': touching, imaginative prose-poem. 'Shattered Illusions': a K/S story of sorts. In the Mirror Universe, Kirk finds out that the 'other' Kirk and Spock are physically intimate. That 'look in the mirror' makes him realize such ideas have crossed his own mind. The question is, can he -- and Spock -- deal with them in their home universe? If the author had answered that question, this would have been an excellent story rather than a fairly good segment. 'The Lady in Lycra': a thorougly predictable story about Spock in pon farr, taking his neeed to a Vulcan woman who specializes in this service. 'The Good Samaritans': Klysadel stories are usually too complicated to explain in a line or two, and this one is no exception. It is, however, oddly compelling, and much more succinct than is usual with this author. Unfortunately, her accompanying illos did not reproduce well. 'The Pendulum': an offensive story, not because of of explicitiness (which does not offend Tigriffin) or the quality of writing per se, but because the author does not seem to note a difference between hormonally-induced violence in the Vulcan pon farr and ordinary sadism. The implication that real female sexuality is submissive masochism does a disservice to all women. 'Cross Currents': disappointing, though whether this is in spite of, or because, it is written by Marion Zimmer Bradley, a highly-talented author, Tigriffin cannot say. Some may feel it is nice for a sf pro to take the time to write a story for a fanzine at all, those people will probably enjoy the story anyway, in spite of characterizations that miss their target, a familiar plot idea (K/S aren't the only gay couple on the Big E), and simpering, sterotyped dialogue. 'Discovery': K/S sex. No why, just detailed descriptions of what, where, and how. 'For A That': superior handling of Scotty's reaction to learning that Kirk and Spock are lovers. Best of zine award. 'Learner's Permit': a one-joke story, typing up sex and stickshifts. Luckily, it is fast-paced, and the reader breezes through it before the humor stalls out. 'Samurai Kitty': delightful, imaginative, slightly satirical vignette about M'ress in heat on the Shore Leave planet, by Paula Smith, who also provided brief 'species' jokes that appears at the bottom of most pages in the zine. Both add a neat touch of humor to balance the serious contributions. Overall contents: good. Repro: very good. Art: fair to excellent, with the characteristic oversize fold-out sheets being especially worthy of admiration, both for the artists responsible and the editor who took the trouble to reproduce them well. Value: $6.75 FC seems like a fair and reasonable price.[32]
This is the latest issue of one of fandom's first X-rated ST fanzines, and like most T'Kuhtian Press publications, it is a class 'zine. There is something in here for everyone, including some of the best adult humor in fandom. Gordon Carleton has produced an excellent illustrated "U.F.P. Guide to Sex", and there are one-line zingers at the bottom of most of the pages that will leave you howling. This issue features a large number of short stories, so I'll just mention the highlights. My favorite entry is a short-short-short story about Lt. M'Ress by Paula Smith called "Samurai Kitty." It's an X-rated tale of her last visit to the SHORE LEAVE planet. The accompanying fold-out illustration by V.M. Wyman is excellent. There are several K/S stories, the best of which is "For A' That" by Nancy Zingrone Solomon. Scott falls in love with a Scottish woman psychiatrist of his own age who helps him come to grips with his feelings when he discovers the Kirk/Spock relationship. Another interesting entry is "The Good Samaritans", a non-ST story from the KLYSADEL Universe written and illustrated by Anji Valenza. The story concerns alien rebels who are cast out of their own society and persecuted for their deviant sexual practices. It is an extremely interesting treatment of alien sexuality marred only by a Deus Ex Machina ending.[33]
[zine]:
  • Jiggle / A young lieutenant who has been diligently using her new bust developer attempts to make the most of her escort duty with a visiting admiral, with startling results when the device proves unfortunately responsive to a particular pitch.
  • Paradise Regained / The Enterprise agronomy specialists inform Akuta that there will be a pollination exercise tomorrow. This sends the People into confusion; if they are resuming the ways of the Dim Time, the Sacrifice comes before the pollination - so they decide to hold one that night, to the consternation of the landing party - until they discover that the sacrifice involves an orgy rather than bloodshed.
  • The U.F.P. Guide to Sex / More of Gordon's cartoons.
  • Shattered Illusions / In the Mirror Universe, meaning only to stall Mirror-Spock, Kirk discovers that in the Empire, Kirk does not come to Spock's room to discuss ship's business. To maintain the charade, he goes through with the encounter. On return to our own universe, Kirk confronts Spock with their discovery.
  • The Lady of the Lyra / It's pon farr, but this time Spock has made arrangements with a skilled professional to take care of him.
  • The Good Samaritans / Non-Trek. A fish-like being who has been a first-contact specialist crashes on a planet to die, but the feathered inhabitants rescue it as an emissary of their new god. The group turn out to be refugees; their new god has given them a sexual freedom that disturbs the others of their kind, who are pursuing them. The group is rescued by a humanoid, who has come after the fish - now dead - and transplanted to a suitable planet.
  • The Pendulum / Lt. Kelly Marchant helps Spock through a surprise attack of pon farr while on landing party. In plak tow, Spock sees her as T'Pring and treats her accordingly - very roughly. Back aboard ship, things turn pleasurable as the fever winds down.
  • Cross Currents / Christine Chapel and Janice Rand use their supposed infatuations with, respectively, Spock and Kirk, as cover for their relationship.
  • Discovery / A nice little K/S idyll. Kirk and Spock are stranded for several weeks on a safe and snug little planet. The only real problem is Kirk's embarrassment over his own steadily increasing horniness, inexplicably triggered by Spock's presence. Kirk is surprised to find the Vulcan not only aware of his predicament, but amenable to a solution.
  • For A' That / A fine story that packs in a good plot, a fine character study of Scotty, and a bit of romance. Scott is engaging in a quiet, companionable romance with fellow-Scot Maggie Buchan, the ship's new Psych Chief - helping her build her loom and enjoying her home-cooking and whiskey. They and the rest of deck 5 wake to find the environmental controls gone haywire, nearly freezing most of the officers; Scott races to assist in Kirk's cabin, where to his shock he finds McCoy working on both Kirk and Spock, who have fallen unconscious cuddled up together. Most of the story revolves around Scott's struggle to come to terms with that relationship. Excellent writing. There's a nice little nod to the Faulwell series, mentioning her as McCoy's lass.
  • Learner's Permit / Non-Trek first-time story "from the adventures of Kenney Dantley"
  • Samurai Kitty / Vignette on an illustration of a samurai cat charging into sexy cat's exotic room. M'ress has the good fortune to be on the Shore Leave planet when she goes into heat.
  • By George! / [cartoon] Leah can't decide between Han and Luke, so she leaves them... together at last.
  • Poetry:
    • Mythology /
    • Stone Cold Earth Woman for Mr. Spock /
    • Private Conversation...[with Scotch] / McCoy attempts to jolly Scotty into accepting Kirk & Spock's relationship - and ends up with a black eye for his trouble.
    • Bound - an Answer / Spock's reply to Kirk's anger in Paula Smith's interesting poem from Obsc'zine #2 [34]

References

  1. from Time Warp #1
  2. Catalena Mara's June 6, 2012 post to the K/S Zine Friends Facebook group, quoted with permission.
  3. from a fan in Interstat #3 (1978)
  4. from Interstat #4 (1978)
  5. from Alderaan #12
  6. from Alderaan #14
  7. from An Interview with Jacqueline Lichtenberg (1978)
  8. Boldly Writing, pg 39.
  9. from Connie Faddis in Scuttlebutt #1 and Interphase #4
  10. from Not Tonight Spock #7
  11. from a LoC by Valerie P in Obsc'zine #2
  12. published in Warped Space #20
  13. from a LoC in Obsc'zine #2
  14. from a LoC by Steve E in Obsc'zine #2
  15. from a LoC in Obsc'zine #2
  16. from a LoC in Obsc'zine #2
  17. from a LoC in Obsc'zine #2
  18. from a LoC in Obsc'zine #2
  19. from a LoC in Obsc'zine #2
  20. from Leslye L. who writes a Letter of Comment in Obsc'zine #2 as though she was Sahaj, though seeing how Obsc'zine required an age statement to purchase, and with good reason, it is unclear how Sahaj procured this zine, nor why he would admit to owning it. Naughty boy! ;-)
  21. Pentopia
  22. from Not Tonight, Spock! #9
  23. from Scuttlebutt #4
  24. from Not Tonight Spock! #9
  25. from Jane Aumerle in Mahko Root #1
  26. Halliday’s Star Trek Zinedex (TOS) - Title Index, Archived version
  27. from A Companion in Zeor #4
  28. from Scuttlebutt #9
  29. Halliday’s Star Trek Zinedex (TOS) - Title Index, Archived version
  30. Boldly Writing, pg 52.
  31. 4 September 2009 Master List of K/S Favorites *Updated Nov 19, 2013*, Mary Monroe
  32. from Datazine #10
  33. from TREKisM #16
  34. Halliday’s Star Trek Zinedex (TOS) - Title Index, Archived version