Fleet

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Zine
Title: Fleet
Publisher: United Federation of Planets and Starfleet Command, Inc.
Editor(s): Rudy Linke, Paulie Gilmore was the art editor
Type: fanfic, art, articles
Date(s): 1976-1978
Frequency:
Medium: print
Size:
Fandom: Star Trek: TOS, Star Wars & multimedia
Language: English
External Links:
Click here for related articles on Fanlore.

Fleet is subtitled, "The Newszine for Starfleet Command." It began as a Star Trek: TOS newsletter containing fiction, art and news and later branched out into a science fiction multimedia content (mainly Star Wars).

This zine series is the successor to Starbase Ten.

The series contains the long-running, and often maligned, serial "Dreadnought Incidents."

It is likely that the scathing letter in issue #25, along with the end of the seemingly disliked long-running serial (The Dreadnought Incidents), combined with a lack of focus coupled with a general weariness in trying to drum up content led to issue #26 being the last in the series.

General Fan Comments

A general LoC of FLEET — as a whole, it's very good. Ihe artwork is excellent, not a clinker in the lot, and the covers are always either pretty or funny, and sometimes both. I just couldn't get into the "Dreadnought Incidents." It's running longer than '"The Weight" (which has been going along in Warped Space for the last year and a half) and it's not half so provocative. End the thing, already.

Other stories are usually pretty good. Where you shine is in the long articles - the Treknology column, and the book and fanzine reviews. I'm only sorry that you only do one long review an issue. You miss a lot of them, that way.

The puzzles and trivia are the usual, but I really dig those Want Ads. Only thing is ~ which are the real ones, and which are the phonies?

Anyway keep it up. It's a good zine, and should get around more than it does. No one on the East Coast gets to see it except for us loonies who braved the freezing cold to haul up to Lansing.

Keep up the good work ~ Keep on Trekkin' ~ forcefully, Roberta Rogow [1]

Dear FLEET; Being a member of the UFP/SFG and subscriber to FLEET for over three years, I have some observations.

First, I am satisfied with the way the club has developed and grown. This is not to say that it hasn't had some drawbacks - all things do - but it is doing fine.

Second, I would like to comment on FLEET. Starting as Starbase Ten, it has grown from a poor second-rate excuse for a fanzine to a better class entirely. The artwork has been excellent, and except for a few dogs (i.e. "Incident at Cruxus," "The Dreadnought Incidents") the material has also been very good. The quality of the printing has been, for the most part, excellent. It has all been done beautifully.

Third, I am happy to see the club expand into other areas of science fiction. It is good to have the vast variety of the field shown. Lastly, I am proud to be in a club where the people are warm and friendly to everyone. It is a pleasure to attend all the activities. Lots of luck in the future. Sincerely, Bill Krucek [2]

A Fan's Scathing Letter of Comment

In the second to the last issue, a fan (M. David Johnson) wrote a detailed and highly critical letter of comment:

The God Wars, by Paul Finer is Issue 22 is an example of truly brilliant conception and paints a very old subject in delightfully new paint. The development of man's pride, therein so grippingly described, to the point where he considers himself superior to God; and man's subsequent downfall to destruction thereafter; is a superbly modern portrayal of the events described ... in the Bible, In my opinion, this story would have had the possibility of being considered for a FAAN award except for the fact of Mr. Finer's incredible laziness and also what of the editor who didn't catch him at it and make him do a rewrite) with respect to scientific accuracy. If there is one thing that fandom will not tolerate in a science fiction work, it is gross and inexcusable inaccuracies of such a nature.

On page three, we note that one year after the nuclear holocaust, the population consists of 1000 normal people and millions of "horrid mutations." If Mr. Finer had bothered to perform even the minimal amount of homework in biology and genetics, he would never leave made such a glaring error. Anyone with even the most rudimentary knowledge of said, subjects knows that the mutation phenomena do not function in that manner. On page 4, we note that moving the solar system causes entire galaxies to be displaced and to collide. Oh come on now! ... As can be readily determined from ... the relative masses and the distances involved, moving the solar system would have significantly less effect on surrounding galaxies than throwing a baseball does on the earth.

Following this unbelievable error, is an equally serious one concerning the exceeding of the speed of light and thereafter exploring time????? Anyone familiar with the Theory of Special Relativity can pick up on the inconsistencies of this ... The reference to "infinity" as the boundary of all dimensions is, I suppose, a reasonable error as the mathematical concept of transfinite spaces is almost totally obscure to the layman.

The remainder of this story is fraught with similar inconsistencies and is capped off with a truly horrendous internal inconsistency which is really unforgivable. On page 13: Lee shot first. His biological body exploded into vapor from the energy of the consciousness flowing through it. Only his thought energy remained as a small sphere of light." Then on page 14: "Lee's biological body began to form green scales," Shame on you both: on Paul for not doing the homework and on Karen for not catching it and bouncing it back to Paul. This story could have been truly great if you both hadn't blown it over such simple things. The story line and plot themselves are truly brilliant; it is really shameful to let a work with such potential be spoiled by such laziness.

As for Dean Calin's NoLast Farewell, in Issue 23, other than a minor slip in apparently using a female name (K'Tal) for an apparently male vulcanoid and another minor miss with "angular curves" (sort of like saying "square circles") the only thing I can find wrong with Dean's story is that he doesn't have one. Oh, the characterizations are fairly good and the action scenes are somewhat realistic but what's the point of the whole piece? There's no plot line at all except the trivial "boy meets girl-boy chases girl - girl catches boy" bit which has been so overdone in the past as to make its reappearance here almost physically nauseating. Come on, Dean. I know you can do better than that! I've seen much better out of you in the past. I get the impression that this is another case of lazy writing and lazy editing.

Cohmen Markel's science article, A Quark of Nature„ is factually fine, as far as it goes. It is, however, based obviously on a rather out of date article. Pournelle's column, A Step Farther Out, in GALAXY, Vol. 39 No. 6, gives a much more modern lifting of the "Quarks" currently known to exist or under investigation for possible existence. However, when Cohmen gets away from his reference work and begins speculating about "Quark Bombs" et, then he reveals a decided lack of knowledge of Elementary Particle Theory. The idea that a bomb could be based directly upon direct elementary particle interactions is patently absurd. ... A plauslble science fiction story might be developed ... using these interactions as the basis for a force field to adsorb energy-but never .as a bomb to release energy. And, even discounting this error, Cohmen s contention that such energy would be "free" is so hopeless as to be beneath comment.

As for The Dreadnought Incidents, UUUGGGHHH!!!

None of the people who wrote these items lack intelligence. And our editor, Karen Brandl, is no dummy either. This level of performance does not bespeak lack of intelligence but it does indicate a large degree of laziness on tie parts of the authors and the editor alike. I realize that publishing this zine takes a lot of time and effort and that no one can be reasonably accused of not working hard to accomplish it but such hard work is still not a guarantee that such intellectual laziness will not creep in: it is definitely possible to work hard and still be lazy even if that does sound like a contradiction in terms.

Now that we've cut back to 6 issues per year, it's imperative that we give serious consideration to improving quality and, as authors and editors, to the elimination of such serious blunders as outlined herein.

The editor of the zine replied:

I'd like to thank you, Dave, for writing. It's good to see someone taking enough of an interest in what goes into this zine to write about it, complimentary or otherwise. What about the rest of you??

In response to some of your specific points; 1) I quite agree - The God Wars needed a rewrite. Unfortunately, various pressures (of time as well as other things) prevented it. With 8 issues a year instead of 12 now, we have more time to get rewrites if they are needed. As for the technical points you brought up, I'll take your word for it, but I hang my head in shame- for not catching that bit about Lee's biological body. 2) No Last Farewell - obviously you don't like this type of persona story - be warned, then, because there will be more. As for K'Tal and "angular curves" - K'Tal is the name of a created persona, a male Romulan. Dean didn't choose that name, the person who made up the persona did. And I think "angular curves" is legitimate when used as it was, to describe a female body. 3) The article on quarks was meant for the people who haven't the foggiest notion what a quark is, I wanted it general, not technical. 4) You're not the only one who hates The Dreadnought Incidents! But it's all over, finally. 5) Obviously, with the diversity of material in FLEET, we can't please everybody all the time. Boy-meets-girl stories have as much place here as do technical articles, reviews, Trekstuff, and just about anything else, if it's good. But suggestions, comments, and criticisms are welcomed - we want to know what you want to see. If more people would write letters, like Dave has done, we would have a better idea of what you, the subscribers, want in this zine.)}


Fleet 1

Fleet 1

Fleet 2

Fleet 2

Fleet 3

Fleet 3

Fleet 4

Fleet 4

Fleet 5

Fleet 5

Fleet 6

Fleet 6 was published October 1976.

Fleet 7

Fleet 7 was published January 1977 and contains 21 pages. The front cover is by Dean Calin. The interior artwork is by Dean Calin and Bill Eubank. The editor was Rudy Linke, art director was Dean Calin, and the layout director was Karen Brandl.

cover of issue #7, Dean Calin
[The editorial]:

The existence of a large, well put-together Trek group in the United States is hampered by the fact that other organizations, past and present, have come into existence only to exploit the fans. Other large, honest groups have fallen apart due to lack of organization and communication. When Starfleet Command was just SFC, it was approached by two men under the name of "Trekkies Unite." They proposed bringing the efforts of all the Illinois Fan Clubs together, so that, together, we could be the best club in the country. Needless to say, we didn't reply. If the UFP/SFC ever expects to establish a national status, it should be by the fans asking to join us, not us shoving the club down their throats, telling them it's good for them...

So far, we have a good structure, far from perfect, but we're working on it. What we need now is to offer the people what they want. Per haps it's the "universe" at mosphere of the club, perhaps it's Starfleet's ranking sys tem. Whatever it is that people may find attractive, we shouldn't expect a surge of new members, nor should we concentrate solely on attaining it. Expansion for expansion's sake is foolish and somewhat greedy if you think of it in the same lines as the exploitive monstercons [3] that have been so popular recently. Expansion for the accommodation of a growing interest is only sensible.
  • Editorial by Dean Calin (1)
  • Night Searcher, fiction by James Colton (2)
  • Science Notes by M. David Johnson. (4)
  • The Specter, fiction by Beverly C. Zuk (5)
  • Artwork by Bill Eubank (13)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (15)
  • Death of the Belvedere, poem M. David Johnson (16)
  • Incident at Cruxus, (part three of six), fiction by M. David Johnson (17)

Fleet 8

Fleet 8 was published February 1977 and contains 20 pages. The front cover is by Bill Eubank. The interior artwork is by Dean Calin and Bill Eubank. The editor was Rudy Linke, art director was Dean Calin, and the layout director was Karen Brandl.

cover of issue #8, Bill Eubank
[The editorial]:

The subject for today, people, is apathy. (And who gives a damn about apathy, right?) But seriously, I'm talking about a decided lack of interest on the part of many members of this organization/club/collection of cuckoos. Well, maybe lack of interest isn't quite right - lack of activity is more like it. This is especially noticeable in two areas: the monthly meetings, and FLEET.

At the meetings, it seems like more and more now it's the same small group of people who do all the talking. Who make the decisions. Who come up with ideas. And even who go to Ria's afterwards. Okay, the reason we have elected officials is to make decisions and come up with ideas, but the majority of you people who come to the meetings just sit there. Like knots on a log. We want to hear from you! If you have an idea, don't be afraid to bring it up. (Or even write it down anonymously if you're chicken) A suggestion? A gripe? Speak out! These meetings are not supposed to be only for the enjoyment and edification of a select few, but for everybody. One of our main purposes is simply to have a good time. And I for one am getting a little tired of seeing the same faces (delightful though they may be) at Ria's every single time. Sure, some of us are there till 2 in the morning, but you can leave after an hour if you like. Apd you don't have to order anything. And transportation really isn't a problem - lots of people have cars (and you haven't lived until you've squeezed 6 people into a car built for 2, believe me). The point is - the meetings are the only opportunity we have for the en tire membership (or at least as much as is feasible) to get together. To make new friends. To plan activities. To discuss. To argue. And just to talk! So let's see a little more action and a little less petrification at the next meeting, OK?

As for FLEET - same complaint. It's always the same people who contribute (with a few exceptions). You don't have to be a great artist or writer, you know. Are you a trivia freak? Think up the hardest questions you can and send them to us, Developed a design for a space station? A new kind of spaceship? Got some blueprints better than Franz Joseph's? Been to a convention lately? Tell us about it. Read a great new sf book? Read a lousy new sf book? Write a review. Met Isaac Asimov? Tell us about that. Met Harlan Ellison? Tell us what a great guy he really is. (We accept all kinds of fantasy.) Got an idea for a cartoon? A contest? A costume? You get the idea. Remember, we want Trek-oriented stuff, sure, but we're not limited to Star Trek. The whole universe of sf is at our beck and call. But we need you. All of you. FLEET is your fanzine. (Yes, I know it's a cliche but it's still true.) 3 or 4 people can't continue to do it all. It's not fair to them, or to you. So talk to us. We need you.
  • Guest Editorial (2)
  • Incident at Cruxus (part four of six), fiction by M. David Johnson (4)
  • book review of Imperial Earth by Arthur C. Clarke, review by Karen Brand (8)
  • Science Notes by M. David Johnson P.E. (9)
  • The Spectre, fiction by Beverly Zuk (10)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (20)

Fleet 9

Fleet 9 was published in March 1977.

  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part 1) by Al Witkins
  • other unknown content

Fleet 10

Fleet 10 was published in April 1977.

  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part 2) by Al Witkins
  • a comic strip titled "Spock is Gay!"
  • other unknown content

Fleet 11

Fleet 11 was published in May 1977 and contains 20 pages. The interior artwork is by Dean Calin and Bill Eubank. The editor was Rudy Linke, art director was Dean Calin, and the layout director was Karen Brandl.

cover of issue #11, Bill Eubank, features a Gorn
[The editorial]:

"I hate television violence. It inspires people to kill and rape and steal and deface property. It makes the moral character dissolve - people become reckless when exposed to this mass media orgy of destruction. It would be so nice to watch eight hours of family shows - showing the happiness in life and how good things are."

This is the kind of talk I hate. Perhaps I'm violent, but really now. I think I would grow restless not being able to get nervous tension out by watching television when I can't get out. Personally, if you want violence off the air, you might as well shut all the stations down - any conflict can be loosely described as violence, and we know puritanical viewers won't accept sex in its place. So we get to watch nothing but documentaries consisting of pictures only, because showing people in perfect harmony just is never done.
  • Editorial by Dean Calin (1)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part 3) by Al Witkins (2)
  • Wizards: A Tale of Sword and Sorcery in the Year 2,000, 000 A.D. (movie by Bakshi), a review by Joanne Papin (10)
  • a review of the zine Pegasus by Sandy Sietmann, see that page (13)
  • Spock, the Best of Two Worlds, article by Noreen Sulski (14)
  • Treknology by Dean Calin (17)
  • Ads for "The New Fantasy Shop" and "Uncle Dennis's T-Shirts," two stores in Chicago (19)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (2)

Fleet 12

Fleet 12 was published in June 1977 and contains 22 pages. The interior artwork is by Dean Calin and Bill Eubank. The editor was Rudy Linke, art director was Dean Calin, and the layout director was Karen Brandl.

front cover of issue #12, Bill Eubank
From the open letter by Richard Curth:

As I was recently reviewing my back issues of FLEET, I noticed something unusual about this fanzine. Over the past few issues, it has shrunk! Although the page count has remained at 18 - 20 pages, more and more of this has become partly-filled pages and filler material (ads, editorials, etc.). It is apparent from looking at the index of each issue that the same people are constantly contributing.

While the quality of the material has always been good, it would be nice to see some variety. One of the purposes of a fanzine, to my mind, has always been to allow amateur writers to circulate their stories and to develop some of their writing skills.

I would therefore like to take this opportunity to encourage those of you who have tried to write stories, or would like to write stories, to do so and send them in to FLEET. Stories do not have to be Star Trek-oriented, as evidenced by James Colton's "Night Searcher" in issue #7, so you aren't limited in that respect. Let's face it, this is not "Fantasy and Science Fiction": you aren't competing with major authors or large numbers of other authors. It will probably be printed.

This also applies to all you artists out there. I for one would like to see more cartoons in FLEET, singles and short strips besides longer ones like "Spock Is Gay!" in issue #10, and good artwork always adds interest to fanzines.

Also along these same lines, if you have any comments on the stories or artwork in FLEET, write in and share them with your fellow readers. Any writer or artist likes to know what others think of his work. Compliments are always good for the ego, and constructive criticism (not "I don't like it, but why) helps to make for better future stories.

If fanzines have to rely on only a few people to write all the stories or do all the artwork, and in general contribute to each issue, they start to get stagnant and repetitive. Let's not let that happen to FLEET!
  • Editorial (1)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (parts four and five), fiction by Al Watkins (2)
  • a review by Sandra Sietmann of The Climb, see that page (16)
  • an analysis by Karen Brandl of Star Wars (17)
  • Trekology, article by Dean Calin and Karen Brandl (19)
  • An Open Letter to the Readers of FLEET by Richard Curth (21)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (22)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 12

I promised myself two months ago I would write this letter. Well, as I do eventually get around to fulfilling all my promises, here I am.

I've just read issue twelve, and chapters IV & V of Dreadnought Incidents. I have a vague sense of fear; a variety of scenes, a stubborn character like Alan Williams, a continuing series - I'm warning you, Al, if this turns out to be another Incident at Cruxus, I'm going to rip the staples out of all my FLEETS, and burn them-. I will never forgive M. D. Johnson for starting a good story, one with a nice villainous female (Scotty's stepdaughter, no less) who was a bit overdone, but was nice. Perhaps I liked her because of the total lack of females otherwise in the story. I've heard of the "last woman on Earth," but this was a bit ridiculous. Kirk losing his rational judgment? Well, if there had been a good, physiological reason for it, yes, I might have accepted. But he went crackers, and the only conclusion I get is "Sulu will keep an eye on him." Come on guys, this is Starfleet Command, not Miss Johnson's third grade. You don't just "keep an eye" on an incompetent officer, especially an Admiral. Not unless you want to lose.

Oh, and that ending. Written in five minutes on the back of an envelope during the rush hour, right? That's the only logical explanation for such a farce. It really could have been a good story, one that I might have recommended to others., If the final chapter hadn't been slapped together just to finish the story. I really felt cheated when such a perfect chance for the final climatic, action scene is just tossed to the wolves for what it's worth. I could have have accepted Kythy's suicide If the other action had been acceptable. Unfortunately, there wasn't any other action.

As to Dreadnought Incidents, it was getting a tiny bit difficult to follow, deep, serious, heavy - now Williams is on a planet of fairy tales?? This should prove interesting, wherever it leads (and right now, it's going down the yellow brick road. Yellow brick road??? Okay, but there better be a logical reason for it. I shall wait for it.)

Keep the trivia page! I myself don't work it all the time, as I'm pretty bad at trivia, but I know a couple of people that would be downright crabby if it disappeared. Keep up the good enigmas, Karen.

You know. Dean does such a good job of bull shitting, I'm never quite certain what is truth or fiction in the Treknology. You has fooled the fool, Calin. Not bad, not bad.

I heartily agree with you, Karen, STAR WARS is for fun - and whether you like SF or Trek, or don't, it is well worth the time and wait to see it. And it is definitely not a movie that you see only once - this one is the movie to see several, if not many, times.

Best editorial that I've read in a long time. Neat, concise, and to the
point. Wish there were more like it.

Listen, I like Bill's and Dean's artwork, infact, I don't want to see it stop, but hey, you out there, why not a doodle or two from you also? I can't draw flies with molasses, or else I would, but surely there are more talented people out there. Come out of your shells, peoples!

Must go renew my membership. Take care, all!

The Force Be With You. [4]

Fleet 13

Fleet 13 was published in July 1977 and contains 20 pages. The front cover is by Bill Eubank. The interior artwork is by Dean Calin and Bill Eubank. The editor was Rudy Linke, art director was Dean Calin, and the layout director was Karen Brandl.

front cover of issue #13, Bill Eubank
[The editorial]:

I sit and think. I have been doing a lot of that lately. There isn't much else to do here. Eating, sleeping, and writing in my diary comprise most of my day.

I am different from most people, therefore I am forced to live in this prison. Though this prison has no walls, no bars or locked doors. I am confined here, unable to do the things I most want to do.

I once wanted to be a great novelist, but now I am reduced to writing these few notes in my diary. I once had a great dream of riding in limousines and owning a mansion. Today I do not own a car, nor a home, and only a handful of people know that I exist.

I have learned to accept this. I am now gearing myself for a plain, ordinary, uneventful existence. I doubt very much that I will leave my mark on this planet, for it is much too late now.

My dreams have been shattered and blown about by the winds of chance; my first short story has been rejected.
  • Editorial (1)
  • Luck, original science fiction by Rich Curth (2)
  • review by Rich Curth of the book The Price of the Phoenix , see that page (6)
  • review by Sandra Sietmann of the zine R & R #3, see that page (8)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents, (part six), fiction by Al Watkins (9)
  • Poem of a Dream by Linda Moore (14)
  • Want Ads (humor) compiled by Rich Curth and Rodger Gondor (15)
  • Letter of Comment by Mary Kay Willey (16)
  • More "Letters to FLEET" (cartoon) (18)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (20)

Fleet 14

Fleet 14 was published in August 1977, contains 20 pages, and has a Tuscan Raider cover.

Fleet 15

Fleet 15 was published in September 1977, contains 39 pages, and is an all-art issue with art by Bill Eubank, Paulie Gilmore, Joyce Dvorak, Michael Goodman, Mark Peters, Scott Sodaro, and Jeanette Spacone.

[The editorial]:

Yes, folks, you are now holding the most valuable product that this organization has produced. It is an issue that contains representative art from all of our artists.

But how to tell?

Fan art is a genre of it's own. It is a specific style for a specific medium. A very limited medium of black and white that is produced regularly, most of the time en gratis, simply for the sucess [sic] of a fanzine.

Professional publications have several advantages over fan publications, the first and foremost being money. The cost to print a page is so phenomenally expensive, it's not even in the bounds of many groups to print regularly, unless what they do print is excellent or they can get inexpensive printing at a school or university press (and when a cheap press is located, the print quality can be very poor).

Another money problem comes in payment. Magazines pay their artists a fair amount and they do it on commission. Fanzines simply don't have that kind of money to give out. The returns from the sales are usually enough to pay for the printing of the next issue.

If the publishers of the fanzine play their cards right, they can work it out so that they can pay guest artists a small fee of a few dollars, and maybe afford to have a color plate in one of the issues.

So you see, fan art is not terribly profitable anyway around.

But that is not why fans do their work. They know that there's no immediate reward for what they do. Eventually what they do get is practice, personal satisfaction and most importantly exposure.

Many professionals start out in fandom, either in writing or in art, and eventually the prozines will see a submission and because of the practice with fan work, it is a professional work.

So here's to these artists. May their careers grow. And if we can start them on the road, well, we'll have something to be proud of.

To the artists.
front cover of issue #15, cover by Bill Eubank
  • Introduction by Dean Calin (2)
  • Han by Dean Calin (3)
  • Attack on the Suleiman by Dean Calin (5)
  • from Amok Tim by by Joyce Dvorak (7)
  • Captain Pike by Bill Eubank (9)
  • Kirk by Bill Eucank (11)
  • Do You Remember When... by Scott Sodaro, Bill Eubank (13)
  • Hector, D'Wan & Pailuen by Paulie Gilmore (15)
  • Aren't you a little bit short for a .... by Michael Goodman (17)
  • M'Ress by Mark Peters (17)
  • Kor & Mugatu by Bill Eubank (17)
  • Sulu & Chekov by Bill Eubank (19)
  • The Menagerie Castle by Scott Sodaro (21)
  • McCoy, Scott, Sulu, Chekov & Kirk by Bill Eubank (23)
  • Three Views of Spock by Bill Eubank (25)
  • The Aircab from "Incident at Curxus" (fanfic in previous issues) by Dean Calin (27)
  • Thelev & Kirk by Bill Eubank (27)
  • Gav, Lal & the Keeper by Bill Eubank (29)
  • C3Po & R2D2 by Bill Eubank (31)
  • A Picture by Jeanette Pacone (33)
  • Kirk's I.D. Chart by Bill Eubank (33)
  • Luke & Han by Paulie Gilmore (35)
  • The Princess & the Wookie [sic] by Paulie Gilmore (37)
  • Greetings from the Parody by Paulie Gilmore 939)

Fleet 16

Fleet 16 was published in October 1977 and contains 29 pages. The editor is Rudy Linke, art director is Dean Calin, typing by Karen Brandl, typesetting by Jeanie Dziekan, layout by Dean Calin and March Lupescu. The art is by Dean Calin, Marc Lupescu, Cohman Markel, Bill Eubank, and Paulie Gilmore.

cover of issue #16, Dean Calin: from "The Mote in God's Eye" by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournell
The editorial, once again, discusses the laziness and apathy of club members. Excerpt:

There are a few people who attend meetings occasionally, and usually take no active part in them. But vast majority of our membership does absolutely nothing! Those members who do not live in the Chicago area have an excuse for not attending the monthly meetings, as well as our other activities. But as for the rest of you, what is your excuse?

[snipped]

I hope that all our members will awaken to the warning being sounded and will not let the potential of the Federation fade into a dream of what might have been. I for one do not wish to see this happen, but it is not within my capabilities to stop it alone. To prevent this from happening requires the combined efforts of our membership, in a show of interest and activity which to date has been sorely lacking. I beg you, do not let the Federation become another victim of that that terrible destroyer of dreams, Apathy.
  • Guest Editorial by Rich Curth (1)
  • The First Camping Trip Log, a detailed account of a club camping trip by Dean Calin (4)
  • The Stormtrooper Song, filk to the tune of the Myopic Mouse Tune by The Camping Crew (10)
  • review by Sandy Seitmann of The Castaways, see that page (12)
  • review by Rich Curth of the tie-in book "Planet of Judgement" (12)
  • Calin Column, compares Star Trek and Star Wars by Dean Calin (13)
  • UFP Bulletin Board, announcement of a regular section of this zine for fan communication (14)
  • Star Wars -- It's Smarter Than You Think, article by Randy Kaempen (15)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part eight), fiction by Al Watkins
  • Halloween, poem by Karen Brandl (25)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl and Coleen Cunningham (26)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 16

Concerning issue no. 16: Great! The cover should have been a lighter orange, but it was okay. I like the typefaces on the Table of Content. Really professional looking. The pages should be more neatly balanced though.

Rich Curth's editorial, while true, seemed melodramatic at the iast. Paulie's illustrations of the "Camping Trip Log" were fun. What can I say about 'Three Blind Stormtroopers"?

The reviews were good, but how about illustrations, or a picture of the reviewer at the top? "Calin Column " was loose and disjointed, but said what I felt about things. Randy Kaempen's article was good, but again, dry without illustrations, though Paulie's follow up cartoon was good.

I hate to even mention the "Dreadnought Incidents." That farce of a fable has spun too far for tolerance. The first three installments were okay, maybe even good, but have gone WAY downhill since. When will it end...?

Bill Eubanks illos are, as always, great. Need I say more? I would like to see more new and original work of his. Get him illustrating good stories, not "Dreadnought."

"Halloween" by Karen Brand! was [good]. So was the Trivia page. Pas Volo, Space Freak? Aaarg.

Keep up the good work, and let's see more good stories. Kill the "Dreadnought" and hang Alan Williams. [5]

Fleet 17

Fleet 17 was published in November/December 1977 and contains 46 pages. Editorial staff is Karen Brandl, Dean Calin, and Mark Lupesou. The art is by Dean Calin, Joyce Dvorak, Bill Eubank, Janet Eubank, Paulie Gilmore, Stefani Hirsch, Cohman Markel, and Jeannette Spacone.

cover of issue #17, by Dean Calin: "Marc, Rudy, and Dean rushing to get "Fleet" to the printer on time."
  • Letters of Comment (2)
  • Chess Games, fiction by Gale Stolz (5)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part nine and ten), fiction by Al Witkins (12)
  • Short Takes, reviews of pro Trek books, by Karen Brand (30)
  • UFP Bulletin Board (30)
  • review by Rich Curth of the book "Damnation Alley" (32)
  • review by Sandy Sitemann of Off the Beaten Trek #3, see that page (35)
  • review by Rich Curth of the Ralph Bakshi movie, "The Hobbit" (37)
  • UFP Interpersonal Communique, parody (41)
  • Treknology: How I Learned to Love the Transporter and Stopped Worrying, article by Don Boyd (42)
  • Calin Column (How to create a persona.) by Dean Calin (44)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (46)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 17

The other day, I took out all my back issues of FLEET and its predecessors to re-read, and I was truly impressed by the growth of the magazine. In a few short years, it has grown from a scraggly little nothing zine (anybody remember Starbase 10?) to the fine mag azine that greeted me from today's stack of mail (FLEET #17).

"Chess Games" by Gale Stolz was very good. Bill Eubank's art was, as usual, superb. Dean Calin's artwork has improved greatly.

I find that I must agree with Jason's letter - the "Dreadnought" series has got to go! It is well-written, and sometimes very interesting, but it is just dragging on too long. Please, Al Witkins, have pity on us!

The idea of the UFP Bulletin Board is great. And as for the UFP Interpersonal Communique - MORE, MORE, MORE! Rodger, Rich, Sandy - those personals are wonderful even if I haven't read all the books they refer to. Keep it up! [6]

Fleet 18

Fleet 18 was published in December 1977.

Fleet 19

Fleet 19 was published in January 1978 and contains 19 pages. It was edited by Karen Brandl and Dean Calin. The art is by Bill Eubank, Paulie Gilmore, Cohmen Markel, Jeannette Spacone.

cover of issue #19, Paulie Gilmore: "Han Solo before the quick termination of a conversation with an alien."
[The editorial]:

Hello. Welcome to the first 1978 issue of FLEET. We have a lot of plans to make this year the best ever - new writers, new artists, less serials (hooray!), more trivia from science fic tion, less emphasis on Star Trek, more personas well, you get the idea. We want to expand into other areas: science fiction, fantasy, science fact, as well as Star Trek and Star Wars (which, if truth be told, have been pretty well run into the ground by now). Yes, we have great plans. But we need you - your stories, your artwork, your letters, your life savings... We'll gladly take contributions in any of the above categories, or just about anything you care to send in. All of us here at FLEET are willing to help a beginning writer with his/her stories; we want to encourage new talent as much as possible. Hear that, new talent?? We know you're out there somewhere.

It is just possible that FLEET may be back on schedule within the next month or so - as always, we are at the mercy of our printers. We'll keep you posted in the newsletters.

In the next few months you'll be seeing the end of "The Dreadnought Incidents" (is that cheering we hear??), several stories concerning personas, "The Federation Follies", more reviews and analyses, trivia, articles, and lots more garbage like this editorial. We want to hear from you - if you'd like to see more of one thing and less of something else, well, we won't know unless you tell us.

Goodbye.

P.S. A thought for the month: A man without religion is like a fish without a bicycle. Think about it.
  • Editorial by Karen Brandl (2)
  • Broter, poem by Ubele (3)
  • review by Sandy Sietmann of R & R #5, see that page (4)
  • review by Randy Kaempen of Close Encounters of the Third Kind ( (6)
  • Communications Breakdown, poem by Paulie Gilmore (7)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part 11) by Al Witkins (9)
  • Trivia and Word Search by Karen Brandl (18)

Fleet 20

Fleet 20 was published in April 1978 and contains 20 pages. The art is by Scott Sodaro, Bill Eubank Paulie Gilmore, Joanne Maya, and Cohmen Markel.

cover of issue #20, Scott Sodars
  • Editorial by Rodger Gender ("Where Is the Space Program? What has happened to it? Does anyone care? Now how are we going to get off this planet?") (2)
  • Letter to Fleet (4)
  • Goodbye, Friend, original science fiction by Dean Calin (5)
  • review by Sandy Sietmann of Contact, see that page (9)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part 11), fiction by Al Witkins (11)
  • A Page to Color by Bill Eubank (16)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (19)
  • full-page ad for a paint-it-yourself art shop in Chicago called "Bill's Bee Hive" (run by Bill and Ruth Eubank) (20)

Fleet 21

Fleet 21 was published in April 1978 and contains 30 pages. The art is by Paulie Gilmore, Bill Eubank, David Hockey, Cohmen Markel, and Joanne Maya. The editor is Karen Brandl, the art editor is Paulie Gilmore, other editorial staff is Jeanie Dziekan and Rodger Gondor.

cover of issue #21, "The Federation Folly" by Paulie Gilmore and Cohmen Market
[from the editorial]:

This is a good issue, folks, I think one of our best. Besides our regular features - the trivia page, the fanzine review, and a chapter of "The Dreadnought Incidents" - we present a new story by Rich Curth, "Maiden Voyage." If you're wondering, yes, the characters are based on real people, but it's not necessary to recognize the individuals involved to enjoy the story. (And if you recognize yourself, we are nor responsible for slander suits). Next we have a Calin's-eye-view of what went on at T'Con, and Chapter 13 of "The Dreadnought Incidents." Believe it or not, we are going to finish this story. The final chapter will appear in FLEET #25.

The future - FLEET is constantly evolving, while remaining basically the same. We are always on the lookout for more writers, more artists, new ideas in general. In keeping with this idea, next issue will contain a different kind of science fiction story - "The God Wars," by Paul Finer, illustrated by Bill Eubank. We will also have a review of the new Star Wars novel Splinter of the Mind's Eye. Issue #23 will have a preview to our persona issue - "No Last Farewell," by Dean Calin. And Issue #24 - TA DA! THE SPECIAL PERSONA ISSUE!! Completely devoted to persona, it will feature artwork, stories, description: of various personas, and some tips on creating them. All you people who have persona developed - I need brief descriptions from you - your character, planet, history, etc. Issue #25 - as promised, the Dreadnought finale, plus a few surprises.
  • Editorial by Karen Brandl (2)
  • Letter to Fleet (3)
  • Maiden Voyage (Or, Is This Any Way to Run a Vacation?), a persona science fiction story by Rich Curth (club member/personas all on a space ship together) (4)
  • T'Con Report by Dean Calin, see that page (18)
  • review by Sandy Sietmann of Warped Space #31/32, see that page (20)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part 13) by Al Witkins (22)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (28)
  • Fleet Cover Art Contest (29)

Fleet 22

Fleet 22 was published in May 1978 and contains 28 pages. The interior art is by Bill Eubank, David Hosky, Joanne Maya, and Joyce Dvorak.

cover of issue #22, Bill Eubank: "The God Wars"
  • Editorial by Karen Brandl (2)
  • The God Wars, original science fiction by Paul Finer (3)
  • Metamorphosis, Star Trek TOS art by Joyce Dvorak (15)
  • review by Rich Curth of Splinter of the Mind's Eye, see that page (16)
  • review by Sandy Sietmann of Sahaj Collected, see that page (18)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part fourteen) by Al Watkins (20)
  • A Page to Color by Bill Eubank (26)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (27)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 22

The God Wars, by Paul Finer is Issue 22 is an example of truly brilliant conception and paints a very old subject in delightfully new paint. The development of man's pride, therein so grippingly described, to the point where he considers himself superior to God; and man's subsequent downfall to destruction thereafter; is a superbly modern portrayal of the events described ... in the Bible, In my opinion, this story would have had the possibility of being considered for a FAAN award except for the fact of Mr. Finer's incredible laziness and also what of the editor who didn't catch him at it and make him do a rewrite) with respect to scientific accuracy. If there is one thing that fandom will not tolerate in a science fiction work, it is gross and inexcusable inaccuracies of such a nature.

On page three, we note that one year after the nuclear holocaust, the population consists of 1000 normal people and millions of "horrid mutations." If Mr. Finer had bothered to perform even the minimal amount of homework in biology and genetics, he would never leave made such a glaring error. Anyone with even the most rudimentary knowledge of said, subjects knows that the mutation phenomena do not function in that manner. On page 4, we note that moving the solar system causes entire galaxies to be displaced and to collide. Oh come on now! ... As can be readily determined from ... the relative masses and the distances involved, moving the solar system would have significantly less effect on surrounding galaxies than throwing a baseball does on the earth.

Following this unbelievable error, is an equally serious one concerning the exceeding of the speed of light and thereafter exploring time????? Anyone familiar with the Theory of Special Relativity can pick up on the inconsistencies of this ... The reference to "infinity" as the boundary of all dimensions is, I suppose, a reasonable error as the mathematical concept of transfinite spaces is almost totally obscure to the layman.

The remainder of this story is fraught with similar inconsistencies and is capped off with a truly horrendous internal inconsistency which is really unforgivable. On page 13: Lee shot first. His biological body exploded into vapor from the energy of the consciousness flowing through it. Only his thought energy remained as a small sphere of light." Then on page 14: "Lee's biological body began to form green scales," Shame on you both: on Paul for not doing the homework and on Karen for not catching it and bouncing it back to Paul. This story could have been truly great if you both hadn't blown it over such simple things. The story line and plot themselves are truly brilliant; it is really shameful to let a work with such potential be spoiled by such laziness. [7]

Fleet 23

Fleet 23 was published in May 1978 and contains 30 pages. The art is by Bill Eubank, Paulie Gilmore, Cohman Markel, David Hosky, Joanne Maya, Catlin/Wells, Joni Wagner.

cover of issue #23, Dean Calin: "No Last Farewell"
  • Guest Editorial by Rich Curth (2)
  • Letter to Fleet by David Hosky (3)
  • No Last Farewell, persona fiction by Dean Calin (4)
  • review by Sandy Seitmann of Moonbeam #3, see that page (14)
  • The Galaxy-Ad Infinitum! by Rich Curth (17)
  • A Quark of Nature, article by Cohman Markel (19)
  • Want Ads (humorous) by Rodger Gondor and Rich Curth (20)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part fifteen) by Al Witkins (21)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (29)
  • Intergalactic Flea Market (30)

Fleet 24

Fleet 24 was published in August 1978 and contains 51 pages. It is a persona issue featuring club members.

front cover of issue #24, Paulie Gilmore
back cover of issue #24, David Hosky: "The Sidekicks"
[The editorial]:

Welcome to our Special Persona Issue! And prepare yourself for a crazy trip through many different star systems - with strange worlds and unusual people. We decided that with all the new personas being created around here, a special issue devoted to them would be interesting - and helpful. The people - and creatures - you'll meet in the following pages are a varied lot. Some, like Anra and K'Tal, axe from the Star Trek Universe; Arwen is from fantasy; and most of the others are just plain unique. Elfrakand, for instance, is..... well, you'll just have to read about it.

Dean Calin leads off the issue with an introduction to the theme of personas in general, then it's on to Elfrakand, Lyranth, Loswar, Meredof, and even stranger places. (Actually, there probablyare no stranger places....)

After all the persona stuff is a report on X-Con, the Dragon Con held in Milwaukee this past June, by one of our new members, David Hosky. David is a Hoka. Also, a review of one of this summer's best movies, Capricorn One.

So sit back, turn the page, and meet Pailuen, Lyonors, Jason and the rest. Read about their worlds, their friends, their activities. Enjoy the beautiful artwork by Paulie, Dean, and David. And who knows? Maybe some of you will be inspired to create personas.

Next month, as promised, the end of "The Dreadnought Incidents," along with the usual goodies. A reminder: we still need your contributions, especially artwork. And now stop wasting your time reading this thing and get on to the good stuff!!
  • Editorial by Karen Brandl (2)
  • Introduction to Personas, article by Dean Calin )3)
  • Welcome to Elfrakland by Paulie Gilmore (4)
  • Pauline G'Moerli by Paulie Gilmore (7)
  • Zyggy Zil by Liz Bouras (9)
  • Tanje L'Iswe by Janet Wells (10)
  • Jerys Brenn by Rich Curth (12)
  • Stopover by Rich Curth (12)
  • Anra Elrody by Sandy Sietmann (24)
  • Mi-Sha by Coleen Cunningham (26)
  • K'Tal by Rodger Gondor (28)
  • Tyranth Exposed by Joanne Papin (31)
  • Freawaru Covenry by Jeanie Dziekan (34)
  • Melacasta Hrothgar by Diane Wright (36)
  • Melalyza Covenry by Mary Gapa (37)
  • Encounter at Dawn by Jeanie Dziekan (39)
  • Loswarian Time Line by Dean Calin (41)
  • Jason Nilak by Dean Calin (42)
  • Sean Kamler by Cohmen Markel (43)
  • Arwen by Renee Alper (44)
  • The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen, poem by Renee Alper (44)
  • Dragon Encounter, a con report for the then-recent DragonCon by David Hosky (45)
  • To Tell the Truth, fiction by Randy Kaempen (50)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 24

A little black humor to start the day off right. Issue 24 is definitely much better looking than the earlier copies of FLEET I had seen—what, two years ago? The contents level has not changed—still very goshwow, but hell, sensawunda is good for you. But the graphics do help; Paulie is obviously more prolific than Eubank was. Pleasant.

The fiction is pretty good, particularly "Stopover." Both authors are plainly adept enough not to make Mary Sues out of their personal histories. Certainly, they may succeed in their challenges, but not improbably fast, nor through incredible coincidences.

David Hosky amazes me. I made his acquaintance at Windy-Con—or rather, renewed it, I should say, as I am something by way of his godmother. I would have thought it be difficult for him to handle a pen, his fingers being fused, but la, there it is. Maybe he uses his teeth.

Thanks for the freebie. Do you need a longer LoC? [8]

Fleet 25

Fleet 25 was published in October 1978 and contains 46 pages. The art is by Paulie Gilmore, Bill Eubank, David Hosky, and Cohmen Markel.

front cover of issue #25, Bill Eubank: Battlestar Galactica
back cover of issue #25, Paulie Gilmore: "Star Craze"
  • Editorial (2)
  • Letter to Fleet by M. David Johnson (3)
  • Gorean Turnabout by Rich Curth (6)
  • David's Diary: The 1978 UFP Camping Trip -- Campers, Racoons & Bears, Oh My! by David Michael Hosky (13)
  • In Search of Fire by Rudy Linke (19)
  • The Spacer by Leslie Carlisle (21)
  • review by Sandy Sietmann of Pern Portfolio, see that page (22)
  • review of Battlestar Galactica by Randy Kaempen (24)
  • Want Ads, numerous (27)
  • The Dreadnought Incidents (part sixteen and seventeen) by Al Watkins (28)
  • UFP Bulletin Board (43)
  • Trivia by Karen Brandl (44)
  • Intergalactic Flea Market (45)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 25

Congratulations on your 25th issue. I edited the first issue of Starbase 10, and I can say that FLEET has come a long way.

About issue no. 25: M. David Johnson's "Critique" was very slanted toward the negative. What he wrote was a very opinionated letter, not an objective critique. I was quite pleased with the editor's response.

"Gorean Turnabout" was a good story, despite how degrading and physically nauseating the Gor concept is. Rich Curth's style has developed from a collection of meandering sentences to honest-to-gosh stories with plots. I hope he continues to develop his talents. How about a Galactica or a Star Wars piece?

I loved the illos for the camping trip log. Some of them were great! "In search of Fire" by Rudy Linke was hysterical! A silly story in the best Philip Jose Farmer style.

The reviews were okay, but like it's been said before, so much time is put to review a few things, when you could review a lot more in the same amount of space. Additionally I feel that Randy Kaempen can put his writing ability more toward fiction.

I hate to say it, but Bill Eubank's artwork has been slipping. Look at his work in the art issue (#15 - ed. ) and look at the material in this issue. What happened to the accuracy, the fine lines, the photographic likenesses?

I am relieved that the "Dreadnought Incidents" is finally over. I realize that FLEET was committed to end the "saga" but that thing was too much. Al Witkins could write a decent story if he tried, once he gets these grandiose thrills out of his system and concentrates on believability and consistency.

May the Force be With You. [9]

Fleet 26

Fleet 26 was published in October 1978 and contains 34 pages. The art is by Dean Calin, Bill Eubank, Paulie Gilmore, David Hosky, and Cohmen Markel.

front cover of issue #26, Janet Wells, 1st prize winner, 1978 cover art contest
back cover of #26, Dean Calin, "The Original Cylon"
[from the editorial]:

Well, we're past 23 and rolling on towards 50!! Right. Well, you've got to be optimistic, so they say.

Issue 26, (that's this one) contains several interesting items. Leading off is a short story, 'Memento," which won first prize in a science fiction story contest at the University of Illinois, and was first printed in the "Illinois Technograph," a student engineering magazine. Next is an interview with Geoffrey Mandel (who you should recognize from his work in Starlog and the Star Trek Poster Magazine) conducted a few months ago by our own Dean Calin. Then, a rather unusual look at science fiction fandom by Joanne Papin, followed by a report on WindyCon V, held in Arlington Heights this past October. Sandy Sietmann comes up with another fanzine review, then something unusual - a poem that was sent in anonymously. Whoever wrote it, if you're reading this - let us know who you are! Last is a sequel to "Chess Games" - a Trek story by Gale Stolz from a few issues back. No trivia this month, sorry, but I've just about run dry. Anyone else that would like to make up some puzzles, word games, questions, etc. etc. etc. (you get the idea) please do so. About our cover - remember the FLEET cover art contest this summer? Well, we had two entries, and this beautiful dragon by Janet Wells was the winner. The second place entry will be run in the near future. Three letters to FLEET this month; I think that's a record.

References

  1. from "Fleet" #21 (April 1978)
  2. from "Fleet" #26
  3. One example: Creation Con.
  4. letter of comment by Mary Kay Willey in "Fleet" #13
  5. one of the letters of comment in Fleet #17
  6. from an LoC in "Fleet" #20
  7. from a letter of comment by M. David Johnson printed in "Fleet" #25, see A Fan's Scathing Letter of Comment for the entire letter, as well as the zine editor's reply.
  8. from Paula Smith in "Fleet" #26
  9. from Dean Calin in "Fleet" #26