Enarraré

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Zine
Title: Enarraré
Publisher: Isle of Gramarye Press
Editor(s): Annie Hamilton, Kathryn Andersen, Linda Mitchell
Date(s): 1986-2000
Series?:
Medium: print zine
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: multimedia
Language: English
External Links: Enarraré
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Enarraré is a gen science fiction multimedia anthology.

From the Co-editor, Kathryn Andersen

I was there at the dawn of the Enarraré age... Well, I was. I, Kathryn Andersen, speak. It was there in my own lounge room that Annie Hamilton was trying to come up with a name for her new fanzine, so I took out the family copy of the Compact Oxford Dictionary, and started looking up obscure and archaic words that sounded good and meant something interesting. And eventually we found "enarrate: to tell out clearly", hence, "Enarraré" from the Old French, "story".
flyer printed in Qapla'
For those who wanted to know, the pronunciation is: Enarraré is EH-nah-RAH-ray.
I cannot recall when issues 1 and 2 came out, since they don't actually have a date on them. But it was probably late 1986. Issues 3-7 all came out in 1987. That was a busy year. I was a uni student at the time, so I had enough Copious Free Time to actually help a great deal, doing much illustration and layout of stories, particularly in issues 5-7, so I suppose I could be credited with being co-editor at that time. After that, due to various things, such as moving to another state, I could no longer be involved with the editorial process of Enarraré. But I still contributed. 1988-1989 was the time of the Opus, as the Enarraré Blake's 7 Special Edition was known when it was being worked on. Known among fen as the Big Black Zine, it won the 1989 Australian Media Science Fiction Award for best fanzine. The editorial committee consisted of Annie Hamilton, Maria Letters, Ellen Parry and Christine Poulson. This issue was also nominated for a FanQ award, even though at that time only five issues had actually been sold to people in the USA. There must have been numerous pirate copies circulating for the nomination to have taken place for that US award. Enarraré 8 came out in 1992. This time it was just Annie Hamilton and Ellen Parry who edited it... Then there was a long pause, due to various things, and then Annie discovered Space: Above and Beyond and started writing The Parameters of Peace. Because of the imminence of the Neutral Zone convention which had a number of S:AAB guests, publication dates were again revised, and Enarraré 10 (the first S:AAB special) came out before Enarraré 9, even though printing of #9 had already begun. Issues 9, 11 and 12 all came out more or less within a month or so of each other." [1]

Descriptions

A collection of stories in British fandoms that will have you speaking with an accent before you're through. [2]
"This is the most consistently excellent fanzine of my acquaintance. The editors are perfectionists (and consequently don't produce zines that often). Except for the special Blake's 7-only edition (which won the Australian Science Fiction Media Award for Best Fanzine in 1989) this fanzine has a mix of British SF&F media based prose & poetry (Doctor Who, Blake's 7, UFO, Sapphire & Steel and so on). With a stable of excellent writers and artists, this is always a treat."[3]

Issue 1

Enarraré 1 was published in 1986 (though undated) and contains 75 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen, Michelle Hanrahan, Karen McDonald and Annie Hamilton.

Contents:

  • Advice by Kathryn Andersen (Doctor Who poem)
  • Review
  • The Sting by Catherine Stewart (Sapphire & Steel)
  • The First Tuesday In April by Catherine Stewart (UFO)
  • By The Pricking Of My Thumbs (The Pattern of Infinity part 1) by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7, end of season 4) (revised, appeared in Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)

Issue 2

Enarraré 2 was published in 1986 (though undated) and contains 55 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen, and Karen McDonald.

Contents:

  • S.H.A.D.O.N.O.N.S.E.N.S.E (UFO poem)
  • Time Agent by Catherine Stewart (Sapphire & Steel filk)
  • How To Ruin A Picnic by Catherine Stewart (Doctor Who, 4th Doc + Leela)
  • How Sharper Than A Serpent's Tooth (The Pattern of Infinity part 2) by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7, season 5) (revised, appeared in Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)

Issue 3

Enarraré 3 was published in 1987 and contains 73 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen, Jason Webb and Annie Hamilton.

Contents:

  • Projekt: Heinrich by Catherine Stewart (UFO) (reprinted in Refractions 6)
  • Snakedance by Kathryn Andersen (Doctor Who poem)
  • On the Way to the Midnight Sun by Marie Logan (Ladyhawke) (revised, appeared in Refractions 2)
  • Whether 'Tis Nobler In the Mind (The Pattern of Infinity part 3a) by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7, season 5) (revised, appeared in Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)

Issue 4

Enarraré 4 was published in 1987 and contains 42 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen and Annie Hamilton.

Contents:

  • I've Been Everywhere (Doctor Who filk)
  • CONsternation by Jenny Hayward (Tomorrow People) (also posted on TPFIC-L)
  • Timespan by Catherine Stewart (Sapphire & Steel)
  • To Take Up Arms (The Pattern of Infinity part 3b) by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7, season 5) (revised, appeared in Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)

Issue 5

Enarraré 5 was published in 1987 and contains 55 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen and Bernice Cuffe.

Contents:

  • Resolution by Kathryn Andersen (Blake's 7 poem) (reprinted in Refractions 2)
  • The Long Sleep by Kathryn Andersen (UFO poem) (reprinted in Refractions 2)
  • Strange Allies by Jenny Hayward (Blake's 7) (reprinted in Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)
  • No Escape by Kathryn Andersen (Sapphire & Steel poem)
  • Reasons (or Karen's Bedtime Story) by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7) (retitled Where The Shadows Are for Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)
  • Pandora's Legacy (Five) by Marie Logan (Blake's 7) (reprinted in Chronicles 56/57/58)
  • Key (part 1) by Jenny Hayward & Marie Logan (Blake's 7) (reprinted in Chronicles 56/57/58)
  • Timetrap by Catherine Stewart (Sapphire & Steel)

Issue 6

Enarraré 6 was published in 1987 and contains 62 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen, and Fiona Ward and Annie Hamilton.

Contents:

  • Detention Cell by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7)
  • These Are The Fields Where The Unicorns Graze (Six) by Marie Logan (Blake's 7)
  • Key (part 2) by Jenny Hayward & Marie Logan (Blake's 7) (reprinted in Chronicles 56/57/58)
  • Cloudeye by Catherine Stewart (UFO) (reprinted in The UFO Zine)

Issue 7

Enarraré 7 was published in 1987 and contains 65 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen and Annie Hamilton.

Contents:

  • Answer by Kathryn Andersen (Blake's 7 poem)
  • Sopron Inversion by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7)
  • Numbers Are My Bestest Friends (Seven) by Marie Logan (Blake's 7)
  • Key (part 3) by Jenny Hayward & Marie Logan (Blake's 7) (reprinted in Chronicles 56/57/58)
  • Hoist On A Dark Petard by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7) (reprinted in Enarraré Blake's 7 Special)
  • Folio
  • Heart of Stone by Marie Logan (Blake's 7) (reprinted ??)

Issue 8

cover of issue 8
1995 flyer for issue #8

Enarraré 8 was published in 1992 and contains 183 pages, A4 format, reduced print, coil-bound, board covers. Illustrated by Annie Hamilton, Sonja van den Ende, and Bruce Mitchell.

  • Insurance by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7, Season 3) (Why did Avon really look for Blake in Season 3?)
  • The Gate Beyond Winter by Marie Logan (Blake's 7, Season 3) (An errant Queen is saved from goblins by elf-wights - or is that what is really going on? An earlier version of this story appeared in one of the ConQuest conzines under the title All The King's Horses.)
  • Nascent by Catherine Stewart (Tomorrow People, Season 3) (Tyso's family caravan got one leak too many. Tyso has a scheme to get a new one - but would John approve?)
  • River of Night's Dreaming by Jack Wyngard (Blake's 7, Season 5) (There are two survivors of Gauda Prime. But for how long?)
  • How To Be Ridiculously Well-Acquainted With The First Season of Blake's 7 In Less Time Than It Takes To Make A Good Cup of Coffee by Danny Murphy and David Leighton (Blake's 7 humour) (Comical illustrated descriptions (some poetical, some not) of the episodes of the first season. Folio by Sonja van den Ende (Assorted) Full-page drawings by Sonja Van Den Ende.)
  • Might-Have-Beens by Bryn Lantry (Blake's 7, Season 3) poem (Avon thinks of Blake, at the start of season 3.)
  • Infernal Devices by David Tully (Space: 1999, post season 1) (What really happened to Prof. Bergman?)
  • A Lie - After Orbit by Bryn Lantry (Blake's 7, Season 4) poem (Avon's reaction after Orbit.)
  • Celtic Circle by Catherine Stewart (Sapphire and Steel) (The Brendansbane is an old ring - just a family heirloom. Or is it? What happened to the jeweller who was cleaning it? Sapphire and Steel have been assigned - but not everything is as it seems.)
  • The Devil's Loom by Ana Dorfstad (Blake's 7, Season 3) (Avon apparently killed hundreds of people. Is he innocent, has he gone mad - or is it something worse?)
  • The Seventh Rebel by Bryn Lantry (Blake's 7, Season 1) (Blake included Zen in his count of their team. But what did Zen think about it?)
  • In My Enemy's Eyes (The Inheritors, Part 1) by Catherine Stewart (UFO post-Season 1) (Peter Carlin, close encounter, off course, plane crash... survival?)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 8

Enarrare 8 is another offering of mixed British media SF&F from that crowd in Queensland. As usual, all the illos are good, and Bruce Mitchell's are superb. The pieces are mostly Blake's 7 this time, with some peeps from The Tomorrow People, Space 1999, Sapphire & Steel and UFO. There is also a lovely folio by Sonja Van Den Ende, a fan artist I have always admired. But let's look at it piece by piece.

Insurance (Blake's 7 season 3) Ana Dorfstad: This one fills in a little question - if the Liberator treasure room had so much stuff in it, why were stunts like the Kairopan haul needed in season 3? Well written, plausible, gets the character nuances right, particularly the relationship between Blake and Avon.

The Gate Beyond Winter (Blake's 7 season 3) Marie Logan: One of my favourite ever stories. An ancient Queen fights goblins and is rescued by elves - or is that what is really happening? It is so good to see the Seven from such a different perspective. One has one's cake and eats it too, where fantasy meets reality and one finds it to be cultural difference rather than un-reality.

Nascent (Tomorrow People season 3) Catherine Stewart: One sees so few Tomorrow People stories, and this one is fun.

River of Night's Dreaming (Blake's 7 season 5) Jack Wynguard: Sad, but pretty well done. One of those noble uplifting tragic kind of endings. But hope lives on.

How To Be Ridiculously Well-Acquainted With The First Season Of Blake's 7 In Less Time Than It Takes To Make A Good Cup Of Coffee: (Blake's 7 Humour) Danny Murphy and David Leighton: This was full of chuckles. Pomes and other summaries, aptly accompanied by cartoons. My favourites were the ones for Project Avalon and Deliverance.

Might-Have-Beens (Blake's 7 season 3 poem) xBryn Lantry: She's got Avon here dancing on the edge of sentimentality but not quite crossing it.

Infernal Devices (Space 1999 post-season 1) David Tulley: Good style, but I don't care that much for Space 1999 - and this is an improbably happy ending, even though it does explain what happened to Prof. Bergman et al.

A Lie - After Orbit (Blake's 7 season 4 poem) xBryn Lantry: It catches Avon's self-deception well enough. If it was self-deception.

Celtic Circle (Sapphire & Steel) Catherine Stewart: Well done! It is so hard to think of an original and interesting menace for Sapphire and Steel to battle, but she's done it. It was also refreshing to have the 'civilian' play a partnership role rather than a tool role with Steel, amusing to see him wrong for once. I liked the way some things were the reverse of the usual, but still fitting in.

The Devil's Loom (Blake's 7 season 3) Ana Dorfstad: I like the twist. I was sure all along Avon wasn't a psychopath, but I can't be sure that my other suspicions about what was going on wasn't due to my proof-reading a couple of pages of this story earlier. This one explains why the Liberator crew gave up on looking for Blake for most of the third season. Yet another story where good comes out of bad, if the cryptic last paragraphs mean what I think they do.

The Seventh Rebel (Blake's 7 season 1) xBryn Lantry: A different idea, postulating Zen-as-person deciding whether or not it wants to be part of the Cause.

In My Enemy's Eyes: The Inheritors Part 1 (UFO post-season 1) Catherine Stewart: Oh, I like this one so much, perhaps partly because I had been looking forward to it after hearing part of the plot from the author a few years ago. But it is better than I had anticipated. Carlin crashes in the bleak North American tundra, with no one alive out there but the alien whose UFO he had damaged. This is set after her story Cloudeye, from the way some of the characters in that get mentioned. The double meaning of the last remark of Carlin was a pleasantly ironic way to end it. And the way Carlin is trying to avoid Straker's overtures of friendship is amusing. I love the picture of the alien: nicely enigmatic.

Overall, highly reccommended.

P.S. The two stories I re-read most from this zine would have to be "The Gate Beyond Winter" and "Celtic Circle". [4]

And here it is at last, after a two year wait, another offering of mixed British media SF&F from that crowd in Queensland. Worth the wait? Well, I'm impatient, so I wish they'd been faster! As usual all the illos are good, and Bruce Mitchell's are superb. The pieces are mostly Blake's 7 this time, with some peeps from The Tomorrow People, Space: 1999, Sapphire & Steel and UFO. There is also a lovely folio by Sonja Van Den Ende, a fan artist I have always admired. But let's look at it piece by piece.

Insurance by Ana Dorfstad: This one fills in a little question — if the Liberator treasure room had so much stuff in it, why were stunts like the Kairopan haul needed in season 3? Well written, plausible, gets the character nuances right, particularly the relationship between Blake and Avon.

The Gate Beyond Winter by Marie Logan: One of my favourite ever stories. An ancient Queen fights goblins and is rescued by elves — or is that what is really happening? It is so good to see the Seven from such a different perspective. One has one's cake and eats it too, where fantasy meets reality and one finds it to be cultural difference rather than unreality.

Nascent by Catherine Stewart One sees so few tomorrow People stories, and this one is fun.

River of Night's Dreaming by Jack Wynguard: Sad, but pretty well done. One of those noble uplifting tragic kind of endings. But hope lives on.

How To Be Ridiculously Well-Acquainted With The First Season Of Blake's 7 In Less Time Than It Takes To Make A Good Cup Of Coffee by Danny Murphy and David Leighton: This was full of chuckles. Poems and other summaries, aptly accompanied by cartoons. My favourites were the ones for Project Avalon and Deliverance.

Might-Have-Beens by Bryn Lantry: She's got Avon here dancing on the edge of sentimentality but not quite crossing it.

Infernal Devices by David Tulley: Good style, but I don't care that much for Space 1999 — and this is an improbably happy ending, even though it does explain what happened to Prof. Bergman et happened to Prof. Bergman et al.

A Lie: After Orbit by Bryn Lantry: This poem catches Avon's self-deception well enough if it was self-deception.

Celtic Circle by Catherine Stewart. Well done! It is so hard to think of an original and interesting menace for Sapphire and Steel to battle, but she's done it. It was also refreshing to have the "civilian" play a partnership role rather than a tool role with Steel, amusing to see him wrong for once. I liked the way some things were the reverse of the usual.

The Devil's Loom by Ana Dortstad: I like the twist. I was sure all along Avon wasn't a psychopath, but I can't be sure that my other suspicions about what was going on wasn't due to my proof-reading part of this story earlier. This one explains why the Liberator crew gave up on looking for Blake for most of the third season. Yet another story where good comes out of bad, if the cryptic last paragraphs mean what I think they do.

The Seventh Rebel by Bryn Lantry. A different idea, postulating Zen-as-person deciding whether or not it wants to be part of the Cause.

In My Enemy's Eyes: The Inheritors Part I (UFO) by Catherine Stewart. Oh. I like this one so much, perhaps partly because I had been looking forward to it after hearing part of the plot from the author a few years ago. But it is better than I had anticipated. Carlin crashes in the bleak North American tundra, with no one alive out there but the alien whose UFO he had damaged. This is set after her story Cloudeye, from the way some of the characters in that get mentioned. The double meaning of the last remark of Carlin was a pleasantly ironic way to end it. And the way Carlin is trying to avoid Straker's overtures of friendship is amusing. I love the picture of the alien: nicely enigmatic.

Overall, highly recommended. [5]

Issue 9

cover of issue #9

Enarraré 9

  • Blake's 7, UFO, Sapphire and Steel, Doctor Who, The X-Files...
  • Contributors to this issue include: Catherine Stewart, R.J. Anderson, Andrew Williams, Sue Spencer, Adrian Brice, Witold Tieze, Kathryn Andersen and R.S.K.
  • Catherine Stewart continues The Inheritors cycle with A Surfeit of Coincidence, R.J. Anderson contributes a wonderful X-Files story, Possessions, in which Mulder loses his identity, and Andrew Williams and Sue Spencer each provide some food for thought in their Blake's 7 stories.

Issue 10

Enarraré 10

cover of issue #10

Full colour insert. 90 pages, A4 format, reduced print (60 000 words), coil-bound, board covers.

This is a Space: Above and Beyond Special.

  • Inside Outside (Hawkes is in the brig and, for reasons McQueen is having difficulty ascertaining, is reluctant to explain exactly why he started the fight in the bar.)
  • An Inauspicious Beginning (A routine mission on the planet, Stonebrow, starts to go seriously awry. Vansen is hard put to keep control of the gung-ho new recruit assigned to the 58th and when he shoots down a Chig sentry, her anger reaches boiling point. The burial detail finds a strange damaged bio-organic octahedron near the body and that's when the problems really begin...)
  • 265 Different Kinds Of Cheese ("How can you satisfy an interrogator who refuses to believe that you don't know the answer to a simple question? This is the difficulty facing McQueen and Hawkes as they struggle through two very different situations... McQueen has accepted an invitation to speak at an in-vitro recruitment seminar on Earth - his rationale: "They can't edit me in person" - and has been promptly abducted. When conventional investigations fail, the 58th is given permission to try to find him. They wind up in a very different sort of battlefield: an in-vitro ghetto in New York. And their explanations are met with rank derision. Who in their right mind would believe that a group of natural borns would be led by an in-vitro lieutenant and be looking for a 'tank' who happens to be an officer in the space marines - a colonel no less! - and a flying ace and the leader of the famed Kazbek raid and the pilot who shot down Chiggy von Richthoffen? While Hawkes and the 58th land deeper and more desperately in trouble as they try to counter suspicion, McQueen for once is completely out of his depth trying to figure out what's happening to him, where he is, how he got there and what's wanted from him... Award-winning fan author, Annie Hamilton, turns her attention to the Space: Above and Beyond Universe in this series of inter-connected stories and poems, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen and Annie Hamilton.")

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 10

Unlike the previous issues of Enarrare', this one is a collection of stories by one author in one fandom. This time around, Annie Hamilton takes off her editor's hat and plunges in to the beginning of a saga for which all fans of S:AAB should rejoice: The Parameters of Peace series. (and this review is long long overdue)

My copy is from the first run, a contributor's copy (I contributed some illos). The cover changed slightly in later editions (the picture was made smaller, I think). The cover-picture is striking: a photo of McQueen, seen through a hole burned in beige-coloured hand-made paper. At the top left is the symbol of Earth's forces, connected by parallel lines to, on the right, a diagram of a lens, focusing. Down the left side is a squiggle of caligraphy, maybe meant to be Chig writing. At the bottom right are two white feathers. At the very bottom is "Enarrare 10" in calligraphy. Don't worry, it all means something.

Another tidbit that means something is the page facing the Author's Notes On the Parameters of Peace. If I recall correctly, this arose out of a particular discussion Annie and I had about the episode "Eyes". The reader sees a circle, a picture of McQueen, and around it, the border is four questions, and their answers; questions and answers which pertain to episode perfectly. The disturbing thing is that they apply equally well to Dianne Hayden as to McQueen.

Eyes (poem): A good little poem about the episode of the same name.

Inside, Outside (prologue to The Parameters of Peace): This draws you in, and gets you interested. Hawkes is in the brig, and McQueen is trying to find out why. This turns into a fascinating look at the in-vitro psyche, at McQueen and at Hawkes, and their relationship with the 58th.

An Inauspicious Beginning (Parameters of Peace part 1): This is the story which starts off the saga, but one doesn't realize the significance of a number of things until later on in the series. We are introduced briefly to two new supporting characters, Paul "Arkie" Arkell, and Sophie Sallander, who have an important part to play later on. But this one is mostly from Vansen's point of view, as the unexpected happens on the mission to Stonebrow, and certain people's attitudes are changed for the better.

Angel Chained (poem): Another good poem (this one about The Angriest Angel), with an interesting structure.

265 Different Kinds of Cheese (Parameters of Peace part 2): This is the story which makes up the bulk of this zine. And here we get a multi-layered story which holds up just as well on the second or third reading as it did on the first. But the first reading is a unique experience, because this story is just full of surprises. Or maybe there's only a couple of surprises, but the questions just niggle all the way through. We open with McQueen suffering from Aerotech torture, and elsewhere, the Wild Cards are looking for the missing Colonel, asking questions... in an in-vitro ghetto.

One of the cool things about this story is the way that people keep on asking questions, get told the absolute truth, and don't believe a word. Truth is indeed stranger than fiction, and it's such fun (except of course in the parts of the story where people's lives are at stake) to see the assumptions and misunderstandings that go on. The characters are well-painted, and we get a few insights into in-vitro life, as well as the motivations of certain, shall we say, highly placed persons. And we are introduced to the unusual Armand. I shall say no more. [6]

Issue 11

Enarraré 11

cover of issue #11

Over 95000 words, it is a full-length novel, and is illustrated throughout with full-page colour inserts. It has a glossy A4 cover and is coil-bound.

  • Icarus Walking ("The serious student of military history might just be a little concerned on hearing that the names of two upcoming operations against the Chig were called Mulberry Jam and Anvil. And McQueen is quite well acquainted with the subject of World War II. Worried? You bet. He has been temporarily seconded to the U.S.S.S. Nevada and while there, he receives an unambiguous warning that the bad guys haven't given up and that his life is in danger. In the meantime, Ross knows more than he's saying, Arkie is appalled by what he hears on the copy of a black-box recording he's requisitioned from the pilots of the 82nd squadron, Hawkes receives an extremely unpleasant birthday present, Damphouse is having trouble fending off a nosey reporter who has arrived to do a photo-essay on the Wild Cards, Vansen and West are off to the planet Minerva and Wang -- well, he's just about to alter the fate of the universe by changing one word...Part III of the Parameters of Peace is entitled Icarus Walking and is set between the episodes Sugardirt and If They Lay Me Down To Rest.")

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 11

Icarus Walking (Parameters of Peace part 3) Annie Hamilton This story is basically the entire zine. McQueen is temporarily seconded to the Nevada, to train a new squadron made up of the remnants of survivors of Ixion. And in the meantime, Arkie makes a disturbing discovery, and the Wildcards have to deal with the questions of a "human interest" reporter. I think it is probably my favourite in the series, because there are just so many delightful things in it -- a chat-group session where the participants are describing a war movie; conversations where one party is completely baffled as to the significance of things said, or misunderstands things completely, due to their own agendas or their limited information; and a section with some AIs which is both hilarious and surreal. (Yes, I can assure you as an Australian that everything Arkie said about ANZAC day is true, except for one.) But this isn't a comedy, either. Very serious things are said about Politics, and the battle plan, McQueen's insights, and the evil that Aerotech has done, and hints at further things which become clearer later on. Not to mention some about-face surprises, and multi-layered symbolism. And it's also good to watch McQueen interacting with the squadron on the Nevada, and turning around people's opinions of him, while simply trying to do the best job he can. I love this story. [7]

Issue 12

Enarraré 12

cover of issue #12

This issue is a UFO Special.

Illustrated by Kathryn Andersen and Annie Hamilton, A4 in size, 120 pages in reduced print, is coil-bound and has a colour cover.

"The long-awaited third part to Catherine Stewart's Inheritors cycle is finally here! By the time SHADO's security chief has any idea that a significant number of the organisation's senior personnel are acting under alien influence, it's almost too late to do anything about it. Almost. And as if that weren't trouble enough, Scotland Yard is nosing around Harlington-Straker studios, the boss seems finally to have lost his marbles, and there's something very odd about the incarcerated alien which Carlin brought back from the arctic. Indeed, it's becoming a very debatable question as to who as got whom prisoner."

Issue 13

Enarraré 13 It is unclear if there is an issue #13.

Issue 14

Enarraré 14

cover of of issue #14

This issue is a Space: Above and Beyond Special. It is edited by Linda Mitchell and produced with the assistance of Jenny Dodd, Carol Burgess and Karen McDonald. The Parameters of Peace : Parts IV and V

  • The Fox's Wedding and Utsuroi ("The ephemeral dappling of light under trees, the shadow's leaping lack of substance, the fugitive emptiness between one state and another: all these reflect the Japanese concept of 'Utsuroi', wherein beauty is essentially located at its moment of alteration. That which gives the highest pleasure is not the loveliness of the cherry blossom itself, but the knowledge of its fleeting, evanescent nature. 'Utsuroi' is intrinsic to the ideal of sacrificial heroism. "Who's responsible?" Ross asked in the final episode. Well, it may not be entirely clear who is responsible, but it's perfectly obvious who's going to be held responsible. Which only goes to show that McQueen should have given Ross that Humphrey Bogart movie while there was still time. McQueen himself is, of course, recovering in hospital after having his leg blown off by the Chig ambassador who killed the CEO of Aerotech. Recovering? Perhaps that's not the best word. He's assailed by a constant barrage of thoughts -- images of suicide and visions of self-destruction, all accompanied by an incessant drumbeat and one word in every language known to humankind. The word? Honour. Yes, the Chig know where their communications receiver is, they want it destroyed, and they know exactly what psychological buttons to press. Meantime, back at the Saratoga, it's a simple case of: McQueen? -- who you talkin' about, then? It might only have been twenty days since the peace negotiations with the Chig broke down, but it might as well be twenty years. Major Nilsson, the new C.O. of the Wild Cards, has cut such a swathe through their affections that the Colonel is fast receding to a distant memory. Ross, preparing to face a court-martial, sets up his own investigation into how the Chig ambassador was able to smuggle a bomb aboard the Saratoga. The visual record of the negotiations reveals an interesting anomaly -- the only person to survive the blast had a gun in the Chig envoy's face at the moment the explosion occurred. Which means - yes, at that range, there shouldn't have been enough left of McQueen to identify, let alone pack off to hospital. Changing? Oh yes, enormously, but perhaps of everyone, McQueen's is the least seismic change of all. Damphousse is recovering from a head injury, West is thinking seriously about getting married, Hawkes is learning a few things about true love, Vansen about the nature of truth and Arkie about consequences. Speaking of consequences, down outside the headquarters of Aerotech in New York, Elroy-EL arrives at a fateful decision.)
  • The Parameters of Peace series continues with the short story, The Fox's Wedding (Part IV), and the novel, Utsuroi (Part V). Parts I - III (An Inauspicious Beginning, 265 Different Kinds of Cheese, and Icarus Walking) are still available, though in quite short supply. Poems for Enarraré 14 (some of them award-winning) have been contributed by Katie Jennings, Kellie Matthews-Simmons, Kathryn Andersen and Annie Hamilton."

Issue 15

Enarraré 15

cover of issue #15

This issue is a Space: Above and Beyond Special.

The Parameters of Peace : Part VI

The World of Epictetus

  • "The Stoic philosopher, Epictetus, averred that there are things in life you have control over, there are things in life you don't. And, of course, sometimes the more you try to exert control, the worse the situation becomes. Ross is still facing a court-martial, and the motivation for it gradually becomes clear. Once it does, the outcome is, of course, never in doubt. By the time Ross understands the complex subtlety of the plot, it's almost too late to be found guilty. Which, given the nature of what he realises, might well be the best option. Sallander, suspecting the truth, has already thrown caution to the wind and enlisted all available help to counter the conspiracy. Chaput, in an action that will eventually have serious repercussions, has likewise thrown aside all caution to petition Diane Hayden's help in sending a rescue team to retrieve McQueen. In the meantime, Hawkes and West set off on a completely unauthorised mission to rescue the newly-appointed General. To the Chig homeworld, no less. There are simpler ways to commit suicide, but Hawkes and West are much too single-minded to consider them. McQueen is hardly surprised to find himself once more in the hands of silicate interrogators. They are under the supervision of their Chig masters, who find the stench of humans quite appalling and who are more than a little dismayed at the failure of the assassination squad send to eliminate McQueen and the organic technology bonded to him. It was never in any plan to bring him back..."

Issue 16

Enarraré 16

This issue is a Space: Above and Beyond Special. The Mandate of Heaven is a novel-length story of over 120 pages (A4 size), reduced print, double columned, approximately 100 000 words. It concludes the Parameters of Peace series. Internal illustrations will be both black and white and in colour.

The Parameters of Peace : Part VIII

The Mandate of Heaven

  • The news you've been waiting for! The conclusion to this eight-part series is almost here! Pre-orders are now being taken. As you've probably realised, it's our general policy for our publishing blurbs to be vague and ambiguous, because we hate it when the major plot twist is revealed on the back cover. So bear that in mind as you read this synopsis: The Mongol hordes nearly conquered Europe, almost as far as the Atlantic seaboard. What stopped them was the death of Ghengis Khan. Until it was clear that "The Mandate of Heaven" had been bestowed on his successor, the Mongols felt it wise to proceed with caution. In fact, since assurance of victory cam only when they were certain their ruler possessed the favour of the gods, they began to withdraw towards the east. Supreme political power was the evidence of The Mandate of Heaven and also its outcome. Peace? Not a chance. Not any more. The final Chig offensive begins - and the enemy has no intention of stopping until Earth is utterly destroyed. With their technology that's not going to be much more than a morning's work. E. Alan Wayne was quite correct - they haven't really been trying to this point. But, as events have transpired, they now have very good reason to. The political situation on Earth is in complete turmoil. In an attempt to buy time for a full defence to be mounted, a deceitful message is prepared for transmission to the Chig. It's a mere five words long, but the A.I.s are only prepared to help ensure it is accurately translated into the Chig language, if a serious demonstration of good faith is forthcoming. Why the A.I.s? Well, would you trust the Alien Interpretation Unit? Things are so desperate on Earth that the required 'serious demonstration of good faith' is given. Choice or chance? Choice and chance? The endplay takes an unexpected turn as Elroy turns up a wildcard..."

Enarraré Blake's 7 Special

cover of the Blake's 7 Special
another variation of the cover

Enarraré Blake's 7 Special was published in 1989, and contains 340 pages, illustrated by Kathryn Andersen, David Cameron, Annie Hamilton, Maria Letters, Bruce Mitchell, Fiona Niemand, Kate Perrett and Sonja Van den Ende.

Some art from this zine was also used in Blake's 7 Diary.

About:

1988-1989 was the time of the Opus, as the Enarraré Blake's 7 Special Edition was known when it was being worked on. Known among fen as the Big Black Zine, it won the 1989 Australian Media Science Fiction Award for best fanzine. The editorial committee consisted of Annie Hamilton, Maria Letters, Ellen Parry and Christine Poulson. This issue was also nominated for a FanQ award, even though at that time only five issues had actually been sold to people in the USA. There must have been numerous pirate copies circulating for the nomination to have taken place for that US award.[8]

More regarding the pirating of this issue:

Last night I rang up Annie Hamilton, the editor of Enarrare, and received the following interesting information.

There has been a lot of problems with pirating in the US. They know of at mast a dozen copies of Enarrare (the big black zine) that went over there, and they have many dollars of stock still sitting on their hands, and yet the zine appears to be pretty widespread. There was even one person who wrote and asked for a particular page, who said quite openly that they had made 5 or so copies for friends!

If this does not stop, they will have to take strict measures. No more zines that they produce in future will be sold to anyone in the United States, to for anyone in the United States. Full Stop.

So please, please, please make this known! Tell everyone you know. The real zine has a black cover with Enarrare in a design like a metal plate go embossed sideways in the bottom right-hand corner. I don't think the pirates could reproduce that!

This pirating must stop. I'm quite cross about it, and I'm not even one of the editors. Things like this are pernicious, and cause harm. I know of one zine editor in South Australia a few years ago (about '85, think) who produced an excellent zine, Syndicated Images, which folded because of pirating in the US. That was a loss for all of us. Don't let the same thing happen again.

Sorry for the rave, but I feel it. [9]

Contents:

  • Quietus by Catherine Stewart (1)
  • Where The Shadows Are by Ana Dorfstad (reprinted from Enarraré 5) (2)
  • Legacy by Catherine Stewart (4)
  • Ghosts by Jack Wyngard (12)
  • Sevenalia by Annie Hamilton, Christine Maxwell, Kim Owens and Sonja van den Ende (14)
  • A Day In The Life by Douglas Cummings (23)
  • Fragments of Yesterday by Ana Dorfstad (28)
  • Strange Allies by Jenny Hayward (reprinted from Enarraré 5) (35)
  • Fireplay by Marie Logan (36)
  • Fiddler On The Run, filk musical by Danny Murphy (40)
  • Foundation by Ana Dorfstad (49)
  • Wise Enough To Play The Fool by Linda Short (54)
  • Hoist on a Dark Petard by Ana Dorfstad (reprinted from Enarraré 7) (56)
  • Heart of Midnight by Catherine Stewart (66)
  • Folio (67)
  • The Pattern of Infinity by Ana Dorfstad (revised heavily from Enarraré 1-4) (91)
    • By the Pricking of My Thumbs (94)
    • How Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth (114)
    • Whether 'tis Nobler in the Mind (202)
    • Glossary (114)

Reactions and Reviews: Blake's 7 Special

[Fragments of Yesterday]: On GP Blake encounters one of the children he allegedly molested years earlier. Still haunted by his false memories, the youth lashes out against his "assailant." Beautifully crafted story, juxtaposing Fen's recollections of Blake with Blake's recollections of a recently-martyred Jenna. [10]
[Fragments of Yesterday]: I can think of one story that dealt with [the topic of the charges against Blake] excellently: "Fragments of Yesterday" by Ana Dorfstad in the Enarrare Blake's 7 Special (also known as the big black zine). It doesn't actually deal with the general knowledge of Blake's crime, but the effect on one of the children who had had their memories tampered with. Blake, after all, was not the only victim of that frame-up; he was the target, but those three children were the *victims*. [11]
[zine]: This is a gorgeous zine visually and a must for fannish art lovers. The fiction is excellent, too. "The Pattern of Infinity" (a novel-length story by Ana Dorfstad, complete in this zine; not to be confused with J. Kel's series of the same title, or the historical AU zine) is one of my very favorite Avon stories. I especially like the first part, which is extremely vivid and has some juicy hc. The second part, in which Avon reforms the Federation single-handed just to spite Blake, was much less believable; this is a super-Avon story, and if I weren't an Avon fan I doubt I would have liked it. But since I am, I did. :) Characters and events from the entire series are woven into the story in a very clever way.

Also especially memorable for me were "Legacy," in which Blake explains to Jenna why he's sure that Avon won't run; and "Ghosts," in which an aged Vila converses with people from his past before he, too, comes to a tragic end.

"Fiddler on the Run" is great fun. I would have loved to see the original production! [12]

A Premature Prediction Of A Sad End

In 1993, a post to the Lysator mailing list:
"I just heard some sad news today. It looks like New Horizons Queensland will be closing down, because they just can't afford to print any more zines. These are the people who brought us Enarrare', including, (IMHO) the best B7 zine I've ever seen, the Enarrare Special B7 Collecion, which won the Australian Media Science Fiction Award for Best Fanzine in 1989. They make good stuff, and that's the problem, it seems. It's so good, nobody wants to buy it. They just pirate it. Bill Hupe has good stocks of Enarrare' #8, but they're not selling. And if they don't sell, they will be out of pocket several thousand dollars, and they simply can't afford it any more."[13]
A few months later, the zine was held up again on Lysator as an example of how unrestrained American fanzine pirating was ruining fandom:
"A word of warning to anyone planning to sell zines in the States or *to* the States. The pirating is so bad it's like a disease.

Like to hear a horror story? In 1990, an Australian zine was nominated for the FanQ awards for best fanzine. These awards are a large U.S. fan award, and require many votes just to get nominated - another Australian zine sold 250+ copies and was being lobbied for, and didn't get nominated. Guess how many actual, geniune copies of the first zine had been sold in the States? Five. That's right. 5. F-I-V-E. It was a *good* zine.

The difficulty in fighting this is that the poor fan-in-the-dealer's-room has no way of telling if the zine they just bought is a pirate copy, because they've never seen a genuine copy. Number the zines? Anyone can write numbers. Warnings in the editorial? Leave out the editorial in the pirate copy. Special seals or embossing? These are usually mentioned in the editorial, so they just do as above - leave out the editorial. Not all zines have editorials, so how is one to know whether there was an editorial in this zine or not? If the pirate zine is only a partial copy of the original, they can leave out the table of contents. Not all zines have a table of contents, so one won't know that it's missing. Maybe one might become suspicious if the first story starts at page 7, but who really looks at the page numbers? And they could just renumber them anyway. Give your agents authorizations? Anything can be faked, and most people wouldn't know to ask. And even if one did ask, the pirate would just lie through their teeth anyway. Practically no-one but the editor themself would be able to tell for sure.

Some people think that pirating is a victimless crime, but it isn't. I've seen too many good fanzines just simply dissappear because their editors cannot sell their own copies because the pirate copies are easier to buy (or make for one's friends). The ultimate losers are the fans, because there are simply less and less good zines around."[14]

Despite the predictions, the zine continued being edited, published and sold, in erratic intervals until 2000.

References

  1. Enarrare, Archived version
  2. from Agent With Style
  3. Subject: B7ML: Fan Fiction post to Lysator dated Jan 10, 1993.
  4. from Kathryn Andersen at Judith Proctor's Blake's 7 site
  5. review by Kathryn Andersen printed in Tarriel Cell vl6 n.3
  6. from Kathryn A at Katspace, posted December 24, 2001, accessed June 4, 2013
  7. from Katspace, posted December 24, 2001, accessed June 4, 2013
  8. Enarrare, Archived version
  9. from an LoC by Kathryn Andersen in Tarreil Cell v. 4 n.3
  10. Lysator, Sondra S., dated September 6, 1994.
  11. Lysator, Kathryn A, June 1998
  12. from Sarah Thompson at Judith Proctor's Blake's 7 page
  13. Subject: Sad News for Fanzine lovers by Kathyrn A dated June 2, 1993.
  14. Subject: Re: "Who's Blake?" by Kathyrn A dated September 29, 1993.