Afterlife

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You may be looking for the Blake's 7 tie-in book Afterlife.

Trope · Genre
Synonyms: heaven, ascension
Related: deathfic, ghost
See Also: presumed dead, religion
Tropes · Slash Tropes · Tropes by Fandom
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Afterlife fanworks focus on experiences after death in some form of afterlife. They can be a form of deathfic, although the character's death itself is not usually the focus of the story. Stories involving ghosts are usually considered a separate, though related, genre.

Afterlife works are particularly common for canons which include some form of supernatural element. Sometimes elements from types of afterlife, particularly Christian, Greek and Norse, are imposed upon a source in which they are not canonical. Sometimes the afterlife is invented.

Unlike many deathfics, afterlife stories are often comforting, even humorous. Death is perceived as the beginning of a new adventure. Often characters meet up with others, deceased lovers or people from whom they have been estranged in life. There's often an element of humour in the choice of guardians of the afterlife. Sometimes the story shows how much the character has changed during canon, either positively or negatively.

Stories set in the afterlife can also focus on rescuing a character from death.

Example Fanworks

Angel:

Avatar: The Last Airbender:

Blake's 7:

Buffy the Vampire Slayer:

  • Into The Desert by Lizbeth Marcs. Buffy begins the task of starting her life over and rebuilding the Watchers Council without her two best friends at her side.

Chronicles of Narnia:

  • Many stories are set after The Last Battle, in which a form of Narnia acts as an afterlife. A popular trope is stories in which Susan Pevensie is welcomed into Narnia after her death.

Crossovers:

  • Dead Like Me/Buffy the Vampire Slayer:
    • Reaping the Whirlwind (Boom Boom Ba Remix) by Lizbeth Marcs What does the addition of supernatural-related reaps to the reaping workload, Roxy’s promotion, the addition of a new grim reaper with supernatural experience, a new sort-of boyfriend who may or may not be a pirate, and an approaching apocalypse all have in common? New grim reaper boss George doesn’t know, but she’s willing to bet that in the middle of it all the universe will kick her ass. Again. George/Xander.

DC Universe:

Suzan Lovett illustration for "Heaven Knows, Captain Kirk"

Eight Days of Luke:

  • will end in fire by ghost lingering. Norse myth. Uses the popular trope that getting mixed up with mythological figures in life alters the afterlife for which a character is destined.

Harry Potter:

The Lord of the Rings:

Merlin:

Sherlock Holmes:

  • Pursuit of the House-Boat (1897) by John Kendrick Bangs. One of the earliest Holmes pastiches, written before the character was resurrected, has the ghosts of various real people, mythological figures and fictional characters mingling in the afterlife.

The Silmarillion:

Star Trek: TNG:

Star Trek: TOS:

  • "Heaven Knows, Captain Kirk" (1984) is a humorous religious tale in R & R issue 20 by Cindy Deren & Diane Miskiewicz. In it, McCoy, Spock, and Kirk enter heaven and meet Saint Peter and the angel Michael.