Flame and Shadow

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Zine
Title: Flame and Shadow
Publisher: Flame and Shadow Press
Editor(s): Gloria Handley
Date(s): 1991-1998
Series?:
Medium: print zine
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: Beauty and the Beast (TV)
Language: English
External Links: Wayback link to zine website, including story summaries
Click here for related articles on Fanlore.

Flame and Shadow is a het Beauty and the Beast anthology edited by Gloria Handley. There are fourteen issues, some with fiction just by Handley and some with other authors.

An email from the Handley family dated July 26, 2014 indicated that copies of the fanzine may still be available.

Issue 1

Flame and Shadow 1 was published in 1991 and contains 116 pages. The art is by Sharon Reynolds.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • Flame and Shadow:
    The specter of capture by Professor Hughes once again presents a very real threat to Vincent's existence - Hughes' journals still exist somewhere in the archives of the university. Despite the threat to their own lives by unknown assailants, Catherine and Molly, Vincent's childhood friend and 'sister', set out to find them. Once Vincent is safe, and knowing that her love for Vincent will never be returned because of his great love for Catherine, Molly leaves the tunnels. There is a "first time" encounter between Vincent and Catherine and this gives the 'zine its strong "R" rating.
  • Winter Woman:
    "In an ancient time, in an ancient place, there were those called the Warrior-Protectors." Thus begins the tale of Vincent and Mavra. As children, Vincent and Mavra discover they share a very special forbidden bond. Should it become known that they share this bond, they would be exiled from each other forever. Can they keep their secret? And what of the legend that tells when a warrior of his people marries a beautiful woman who comes from a land of ice and snow, that his people will disappear forever - except for one? The short story "Winter Woman" is set in ancient times when human people and the leonine "warrior-protectors" lived side by side. The societies and the customs of the two peoples are interestingly imagined and detailed.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 1

A novelette and a short story by a beginning writer. The novelette, “Flame and Shadow,” breaks in two; part is about the return of Molly, who grew up in the tunnels and loved Vincent. She becomes involved in retrieving Hughes' records, then leaves. The balance of the novelette is a “first time” encounter between Vincent and Catherine. The Molly narrative is rather formless, and the two parts of the novelette don't much connect to one another. The short story, “Winter Woman,” is more fully worked out. In ancient times, human people and “Warrior-Protectors” lived side by side. The story recounts the love between Mavra, a human woman, and Vincent, a “Warrior-Protector.” The societies and the customs of the two peoples are interestingly imagined and detailed. In the center of the zine there's a small poetry collection, mostly by recognized poets. This beginning effort, though uneven, promises well for future stories. All the art is well done.[1]

Issue 2

Flame and Shadow 2 was published in 1991 and contains 127 pages. The art is by Sharon Reynolds and Amy Smith.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • Shadows in the Mirror:
    A mysterious, magical weaver thinks Vincent has mistakenly appeared in the wrong place and the wrong time and sets out to reweave his life, putting him in a time and place more appropriate to his uniqueness. But with each encounter, Vincent's life force becomes weaker. Vincent and Catherine must travel deep beneath the Tunnel World and seek out the hiding place of the Weaver. Lines from the poem "The Lady of Shallot" prove to be clues to help in their search.
  • Shadows of the Heart:
    Diana, Narcissa, young Eric, a letter and a return trip to the catacombs are all instrumental in helping Vincent discover the truth behind the terrors still haunting him about what happened there. It is a truth that could restore his memories and help ease the aching of Catherine's death.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 2

This stronger, second volume contains two stories-one is a lush, magical V/C fantasy; the other, poignant and unsentimental, involves Vincent and Diana. In “Shadows in the Mirror,” Vincent is nearly pulled from his reality by a mysterious “Time Weaver” attempting to relocate him to a more suitable time and place, not realizing how destructive are the effects of her actions in the here and now...where he's anchored by Catherine's love. The story includes a graphic “first time” encounter between Vincent and Catherine. In “Shadows of the Heart,” set in 4th season, Diana tries to help Vincent recover his memory of what happened in the Trilogy cave and come to terms with Catherine's death. Vincent is not yet ready to “move on” to another love, but does succeed in saying a final goodbye to Catherine through a moving letter-burning ceremony proposed by Eric. Written in a cleaner, more direct style, this second story is thoughtful and emotionally very intense. As in the first volume, there's a small collection of poetry, some by recognized poets, others by Robert Handley and Phyllis Doe. All the art is well done.[2]

Issue 3

Flame and Shadow 3 was published in 1992 and contains 124 pages. Much art by Jacquelyn Kapke.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • Winds of Time:
    Vincent and Catherine have planned a three day trip exploring Vincent's world. Everything is perfect, until the night they see the girl with Vincent's face. While searching for the mysterious girl, Vincent is nearly trapped in a cave with her. Is Paracelsus, once again, trying to lure Vincent to his death? Who is the Rememberer and does he bring the prophecy of an ancient legend to Vincent and Catherine?
  • A Gentle Rain:
    A short, short story. While a gentle rain plays its music beyond the terrace doors, Vincent and Catherine share a romantic and sensual evening in her apartment.
  • Ice Shadows:
    With the help of the Tunnel children, Devin initiates a conspiracy to return a destitute, former champion ice skater back on the ice. An important part of the agreement is that she and Vincent meet - again. But first, Devin must prove that he can perfectly execute a skating maneuver without killing himself.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 3

This third volume contains one long story, “Winds of Time,” and two brief ones. In “Winds of Time,” spurred by various sightings of a feline-looking woman, Vincent almost pursues her...which would have led him into a trap set by Paracelsus. Odd occurrences entangle V/C with magical signs and an odd being, “the Rememberer,” who says they are reincarnated eternal lovers. There are many connections here to the story “Winter Woman” in F&S-1, but this story stands on its own. The story has explicit V/C sex but also deals with more than the erotic. “A Gentle Rain” has nothing to do with the episode of that title; instead, it's a brief V/C sexual/sensual encounter. The final story, “Ice Shadows,” concerns Devin's attempt to con, cajole, and otherwise persuade a bitter woman who was once half of a championship quality ice-skating team to don her skates again and return to life. V/C are benevolent background presences; Devin is nicely characterized. Artwork and one poem by Jacquelyn Kapke; art is run one-sided on unnumbered pages.[3]

Issue 4

Flame and Shadow 4 is subtitled, "Gatherings 1". It was published in 1992 and contains 130 pages. Art by Jacquelyn Kapke and Sharon Reynolds.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • Spirit-wolf by Gianina D'Andrea:
    Vincent sets out to consult Narcissa for help in finding a secret door he has seen in a waking dream. On his way, he encounters a Native American girl who is accompanied by a wolf and her cubs. Have they come to the Tunnels to tell Vincent something about the mysteries of his existence? Could they prove to be the key to finding the hidden door?
  • Not My Only Blessing by Jacquelyn Kapke:
    Diana helps Vincent through a time of despair and, with patience and love, they discover a special closeness.
  • Precious Few Moments to Share by Jacquelyn Kapke:
    The story offers a sensuous V/C interlude in his chamber during a break in his seemingly endless duties. Finding it difficult to have some uninterrupted time together, it takes Father to find a solution.
  • Fever Dreams by Rhonda Collins:
    Even the flu bug can't keep Vincent and Catherine apart.
    (reprinted in Friends and Lovers)
  • To Be Alone by Rhonda Collins:
    Fourteen year old Vincent discovers what it is truly like to be alone. Devin and Lisa are gone and to ease his aloneness and curb his aching heart, Vincent embarks on a clandestine adventure he and Devin had planned.
    (reprinted in Friends and Lovers)
  • Dragons' Fall by Cynthia Coe:
    Elliot's life hangs in the balance in a confrontation between St James and the alluring Erin Belton who captivates and professes her love for Elliot. But that deadly lady hadn't counted on meeting the Dragon Lady in the guise of St James! This story has a surprising touch of fantasy.
  • Dragons by Cynthia Coe:
    Elliot finds a new security chief in the guise of the enigmatic and mysterious St James, a woman with a dangerous reputation and formidable intellect, put to use in thwarting gunrunners. Joe tries to warn Elliot about her, but the warning goes unheeded.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 4

With this issue, Flame and Shadow becomes an all-season anthology zine, presenting the work of a number of writers. Several of the stories are effectively offbeat. The unusual and striking “Spirit Wolf” by Gianina D'Andrea brings a Native American girl-and a wolf + cubs-to the tunnels to tell V something about the mysteries of his existence. An elusive, thoughtful tale. Jackie Kapke's 4th season story “Not My Only Blessing” has D helping V through a time of despair and, with patience and love, they discover a special closeness. Kapke's brief “Precious Few Moments to Share” offers a sensuous V/C interlude in his chamber during a break in his seemingly endless duties. Also brief are Rhonda Collins' two stories, “Fever Dreams” and “To Be Alone.” In the former, sick V is nursed by C; in the latter, lonely 14-year-old V has an adventure. In Cynthia Coe's two connected and well written stories, Elliot hires as security chief St. James, a woman with a dangerous reputation and a formidable intellect, put to use in thwarting gunrunners (“Dragons”). In Coe's “Dragon's Fall,” St. James defends Elliot against a new danger in a story with a surprising touch of fantasy. Art by Jacquelyn Kapke and Sharon Reynolds is run one-sided on unnumbered pages.[4]

Issue 5

Flame and Shadow 5 is subtitled, "Gatherings 2". It was published in 1993 and contains 119 pages. Art by Jacquelyn Kapke, Sharon Reynolds and Rhonda Collins.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • One Step at a Time by Rhonda G. Lee:
    Vincent in the sunlight - a dream Catherine had wished for him and one they never experienced. Diana urges him to think about sharing that dream with his son. would they join her for a Sunday picnic on the protected seclusion of her roof? An idea that meets with opposition from an unexpected outside force.
  • A Race Apart, an alternative reality story by Jacquelyn Kapke:
    One of the mysterious mountain creatures has been caught in a deadly animal snare. Can Catherine save and protect this man-beast from the hunters and her family?
  • Sorrow's End by Karen Morgia:
    A brief vignette of a father's thoughts about his motherless child--perhaps not the ones you'd at first suppose.
  • One Night in Central Park by Jacquelyn Kapke:
    This story presents a sensual- but not explicit - V/C interlude.
  • Dragon's Heart by Cynthia Coe:
    This story continues the adventures of security lady St James, in love with Elliot, who's in a tailspin and strangely unsure about how to tell and show her that her love is returned. Elliot becomes so secretive about the preparations that St James becomes suspicious: he's keeping something from her. In this story, married C/V and their child, Chandler, are confidantes of the awkwardly courting pair.
  • Dove Lost, Dove Found by Gloria Handley:
    The story of the involvement of orphaned topsider child Dove and Bill Tillie, a drug pusher who dresses as a clown to prey on children and is responsible for the death of Dove's brother. Some of Tillie's drug-impregnated tattoos are deliberately poisoned. Finding distraught Dove and taking her Below, V/C take a hand to spare other children from this menace. Can Catherine find the deadly clown and stop the killing before more children die? Will fourteen year old Dove tell Catherine before the clown-killer discovers her hiding place?
  • poems by Joyce Murry: "From Scotland we are proud to present, in a celebration of the love of Vincent and Catherine the poems of Joyce Murry" and Dove: "Some lovely poems and art work by teenage poet "Dove" Hodge."

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 5

Somewhat less polished than the previous issue of this now-anthology all season zine series, this issue remains imaginative and interesting. The zine contains six stories and some poems. Pseudonymous (and multiple) Rhonda G. Lee offers “One Step at a Time,” in which Diana pressures/cajoles Vincent into allowing himself and Jacob the pleasure of a barbecue/picnic-including marshmallow toasting-on D's roof...in daylight. A first pleasure and a first step toward a new life. Jacquelyn Kapke's long story “A Race Apart” tells of backwoods gal C's encounter with a strange creature...of the sort her brother is accustomed to hunting and skinning. Caught in one of her brother's leghold traps, V is freed and nursed by C...until her brother and his cronies return to the cabin. Wording is a little uncertain in places here (“...his wild hair obliterated much of his face” “He longed to avenge these wrongs, but he knew one man could not restitute them all.”) but the story moves along at a good clip and the romance is strong here. Karen Morgia's “Sorrow's End” is a brief vignette of a father's thoughts about his motherless child...perhaps not the ones you'd at first suppose. Jacquelyn Kapke's “One Night in Central Park” presents a sensual-but not explicit-V/C interlude. “Dragon's Heart,” by Cynthia Coe, continues the SND adventures of security-lady St. James, in love with Elliot... who's strangely unsure about how to tell and show her that her love is returned. Elliot becomes so secretive about his preparations that St. James becomes suspicious: he's keeping something from her! There's some fairly explicit lovemaking in this story. In this story, married C/V, and their child Chandler, are confidantes of the awkwardly courting pair. Handley's “Dove Lost, Dove Found” is a long, substantial Classic story of the involvement of orphaned topsider child Dove and Bill Tillie, a drug pusher who dresses as a clown to prey on children and is responsible for the death of Dove's brother. Some of Tillie's drug-impregnated press-on tattoos are deliberately poisoned. Finding distraught Dove and taking her Below, V/C take a hand to spare other children from this menace. Also poetry by Joyce Murray and “Pages from Dove's Notebook.” Art by Jacquelyn Kapke, Sharon Reynolds and Rhonda Collins.[5]

Issue 6

Flame and Shadow 6 was published in 1993 and contains 107 pages. Art by Jacquelyn Kapke and Sandy Chandler Shelton.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • I Love you by Ella Wheeler Wilcox (1) (all the stories in this zine are based on this sensual poem by a mainstream author)
  • A Poem of Love by Gloria Handley (2):
    When a young man in his twenties, Vincent had scoffed at Narcissa's words that someday he would find love. But, Vincent learns the truth of her words: that he will find someone who will share his life and give him her love. What Narcissa had not told him was that there would be more than one such woman. Who is the woman who comes to him years later, fulfilling Narcissa's prophecy, bringing him lilacs, her passion, and sharing a dance in the Great Hall?
  • The Best is Yet to Be by Jacquelyn Kapke (14):
    In the quiet of the night, while Catherine sleeps nearby, Vincent rereads some early entries in his journals. Reflecting on their life together, he discovers that even after twenty-five years of marriage to Catherine, the flames of love and passion still burn brightly. The catalyst that had finally broken down the barriers and brought them together was a small book of love poems - which they share again on this special night.
  • Dragon's Mate by Cynthia Coe (32):
    The newest installment of her St James/Elliot saga. The now-married lovers escape the wildness of New York City for the Caribbean, unaware that a deadly hurricane is bearing down on their honeymoon island. Narcissa has powerful allies, but can they help and protect Elliot and St James?
  • Treasures by G.M. Martin (50):
    Reluctant to advance their love to a more physically intimate level, Vincent is forced to reconsider his thinking. Catherine, seeking the safety and comfort of Vincent and the world Below, after a particularly harrowing and life-threatening case, suffers a nightmare which pushes them into a passionately romantic situation. It is then that Vincent realizes the truth behind Pascal's words, "She's a girl, you're a boy. Where's your problem?"
  • Arms of Morpheus by Gloria Jones (71):
    One quiet night, while reflecting back on his life, Vincent discovers anew how his existence had been enriched by knowing Catherine and Diana; that his life was immeasurably sweetened by the different kinds of love he shared with them - spiritual and earthy. This same night, Vincent and Diana are drawn closer by the retelling and sharing of the fears and dreams of their nightmares. And Diana shows Vincent that Sixty isn't too old after all.
  • A Poetic Odyssey by Katrina Relf (79):
    A heart-rending poetic odyssey relating how even the greatest tragedy can at once deepen, and more clearly reveal, love in all its forms. And that tears can wash away the pain and bring hope for the future to the living - if they are willing to dream.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 6

The star of this installment of this well produced and edited all-season anthology zine is a cycle of Katrina Relf's poems, “A Poetic Odyssey,” evoking the whole range of the series-from V/C finding one another, through the good times and dark times, through her death and V's mourning, to the dawning possibilities implicit in Diana's devotion. Also included are Lena's, Joe's, and Elliot's perspectives; and Father's views are a continuing counterpoint. Quietly evocative, these poems are the best work yet of this strong fan poet. In the fiction, Handley's “I Love You” is V's meditation, mostly in the Great Hall, on his despair of love and then finding of love, culminating here in a romantic dance with his beloved. There are two V-in-old-age stories: Jackie Kapke's “The Best is Yet to Be” is Continued Classic-Vincent's reflections on his long, blissful marriage with C, now that their children are grown and gone; Gloria Jones' “Arms of Morpheus” implicitly compares the importance of spiritual and of physical love, pairing him with D after a similar long and fulfilling marriage. In G. M. Martin's “Treasures,” Pascal's advice emboldens V to embark on a “first time” encounter with C. And Cynthia Coe's newest installment of her St. James/ Elliot saga, “Dragon's Mate,” sends the now-married lovers to the Caribbean, threatened by a hurricane, for their honeymoon, the whole infused with Narcissa's special kind of magic and foreseeing. Art by Jacquelyn Kapke and Sandy Chandler Shelton. Some of the stories stray into R territory, but no age statement is requested. Genteel but play-by-play sex in certain stories would justify a stronger rating than PG-13, though that rating is appropriate to the zine as a whole.[6]

Issue 7

art credits from issue #7

Flame and Shadow 7 is a single story subtitled, "Shadow Warriors". It was published in 1994 and contains 164 pages. Art by Rhonda Collins, Jan Durr, Barb Gipson, Rosemarie Hauer, Jackie Kapke, and Sandy C. Shelton.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 7

In this full-length story, friends-becoming-lovers Vincent and Diana are threatened by glimpses of another reality, vaguely medieval. In it, their counterparts are warrior Vildar (Vincent) and Ilyanna, clan Champion (Diana), a conscience as well as defender in arms of her people. That alternate pair are lovers. But they have an enemy: Gadir, who wants to kill Vildar, displace Ilyanna as Champion, and take her to his bed as more than a mistress, less than a wife. Wicked Gadir has found a way of manipulating the barriers between the worlds and dumps the corpses of Ilyanna's main defenders through the gap. Their spread-eagled, naked bodies are found in an alley in New York. Because they're marked with paint as part of the transference magic, Joe Maxwell is convinced that Gregory Coyle, "the Ashman,"is active again and puts Diana on the case. She knows Coyle is dead but how can she disclose that without revealing how she knows...and jeopardizing Vincent and the tunnel community?

Vincent and Diana sometimes find themselves toppling through the breach or their counterparts from the other reality intruding into theirs. On her rooftop, Diana meets what seems to her a suddenly ardent Vincent and later in the tunnels, saves him from being drowned by a "water demon" Gadir has set on him. Transported into that other reality, Vincent overhears the threat to Ilyanna, with whom he feels inexplicably close as he delivers a warning...and she kisses him. And the newest body found spread-eagled in an alley is paint-marked with the countenance of the next intended victim--Diana.

With Narcissa's advice and help, Vincent and Diana attempt to protect their otherworld counterparts and close the opening between the worlds before they themselves are permanently exiled on the other side.

Other striking moments in this tale -- Vincent confronted, on the stairs of the Chamber of the Winds, by an armed, mounted warrior; Diana being directed by Mary to a bathing pool that in fact doesn't exist and finding a struggling Vildar/Vincent there, drowning; Diana's disorientation as she tries to separate passionate Vildar and diffident Vincent in her mind...and emotions; Vincent reviewing the progress of his relationship with Diana from the beginning; the first time he saw her in Catherine's apartment. Those who read primarily for content rather than structure will find much to enjoy in this smorgasbord of uncanny threats and deepening attraction...with passionate, graphic sex for dessert, in the story's final third.[7]

Issue 8

Flame and Shadow 8 is subtitled, "Reflections". It was published in 1994 and contains 155 pages. Art by Rosemarie Hauer, Jacquelyn Kapke, Sandy C. Shelton; border illustrations for chapter openers by Neil Farris.

The story descriptions below are from from an online flyer here, one which also includes excerpts.

  • Winterfest Tale by Nan Dibble (1)
    This story follows the events in "Fever" and previews what is to come in "The Dead of Winter". A troubled Vincent and repentant Cullen mend their friendship as they tote a table for repairs. Cullen persuasively argues why Vincent should invite Catherine to Winterfest... which, until that point, Vincent has been reluctant to do.
  • Come to Bed by Jacquelyn Kapke (8)
    The short story dramatizes Vincent's concern over Diana's workaholism and the toll it takes on her health, given her delicate condition...which Vincent knows about but she, as yet, doesn't even suspect.
  • To Know Him is to Love Him by Avril Bowles (15)
    (A reprint of an award-winning 1994 British mini-zine). Offered sanctuary Below by Vincent to avoid arrest for Gabriel's murder, Diana has an increasingly hard time treating him as just a friend; and holding herself back is becoming unendurable. Vincent misinterprets as dislike and resentment her increasing avoidance of him. Finally, they are forced to confront each other...and their true feelings.
  • Lost and Found by Lisa Hyslop (45)
    A detailed and compassionate imagining of the origins of Mouse and his mother and reveals how Mouse came to the Tunnels and his method of survival until caught by Vincent. A delightful tale.
  • Revelations by Gloria Jones (105)
    A grown-up Jacob reveals to Father that his beloved fiancee, Muriel (Mouse and Jamie's daughter), is unwilling to marry him because of his genetic heritage, which might be passed on to their children. The fresh awareness of the price of difference estranges Jacob from Vincent until a change of heart resolves the problem.
  • Darktalk by Lydia Bower (111)
    A chilling story that throws irresistible force (Vincent/the Other's dread of being abandoned) against immovable object (Diana's decision to attend a police seminar at Quantico, Virginia for several months). The Other thinks, on the whole, the best course would be to kill her rather than let her leave. Vincent is horrified. But the Other is dominant now and challenges Diana to deter or prevent him from carrying out his intention. In an electrifying nighttime encounter continually teetering on the brink of unthinkable violence, Diana's reaction is not what either the reader or the Other would expect. Their high voltage conversation that night, plus an earlier one remembered, create memories that can be cherished only by Vincent's darker self.
  • Sanctuary Withdrawn by Karen Morgia (121)
    The story takes place before "The Beast Within." It tells of how Mitch Denton, seeking to return Below to hide out from his crimes, was denied sanctuary by Vincent.
  • Remember Love by Rosemarie Hauer (134)
    Famed artist Rosemarie Hauer contributes her first-ever Vincent/Diana story. After a four year absence, Diana returns to New York and revisits the Tunnels and Vincent...who is finally ready to open his arms. A beautiful story of love renewed and finally accepted.
  • Fly Away, poem by Jacquelyn Kapke (153)
  • Relegated to Shadows, poem by Jacquelyn Kapke (154)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 8

Surprisingly, the closest this usually all-season anthology gets to Classic is two poems by Jackie Kapke and "A Winterfest Tale" by Nan Dibble, in which troubled Vincent and repentant Cullen mend their friendship (after "Fever") in a second-season story when, as they tote a table for repairs, Cullen argues persuasively why Vincent should invite Catherine to Winterfest...which, until that point, Vincent has been reluctant to do. The rest of the stories are all Vincent/Diana or pre-Catherine.

Avril Bowles' "To Know Him Is to Love Him" is a reprint of an award-winning 1994 British mini-zine (digest?). In it, offered sanctuary Below by Vincent to avoid arrest for Gabriel's murder, Diana has an increasingly hard time treating him as just a friend; and holding herself back is becoming unendurable. Vincent misinterprets as dislike and resentment her increasing avoidance of him. Finally they are forced to confront each other...and their true feelings.

Lydia Bower's excellent "Darktalk" throws irresistible force (Vincent/the Other's dread of being abandoned) against immovable object (Diana's decision to attend a police seminar at Quantico, Virginia, for several months). The Other thinks, on the whole, the best course would be to kill her rather than let her leave. Vincent is horrified. But the Other is dominant now and challenges Diana to deter or prevent him from carrying out his intention. In an electrifying nighttime encounter continually teetering on the brink of unthinkable violence, Diana's reaction is not what either the reader or the Other would expect.

Jackie Kapke's "Come to Bed" (alternatively titled "Working Too Hard" and "Come to Bed, Diana") dramatizes Vincent's concern over Diana's workaholism and the toll it takes on her health, given her delicate condition...which Vincent knows about but she, as yet, doesn't even suspect.

Novelette "Lost and Found" by Lisa Hyslop is a detailed, compassionate, well-crafted imagining of the origins of Mouse.

In Gloria Jones' "Revelations," grown Jacob reveals to Father that his beloved, Muriel (Mouse and Jamie's daughter), is unwilling to marry him because of his genetic heritage, which might be passed on to their children. This fresh awareness of the price of difference estranges Jacob from Vincent until a change of heart resolves the problem.

Karen Morgia's "Sanctuary Withdrawn" tells of how Mitch Denton (before "Beast Within"), seeking to return Below to hide out from his crimes, was denied sanctuary by Vincent.

Famed artist Rosemarie Hauer contributes her first-ever Vincent/Diana story, "Remember Love." In this substantial, well-written tale, after a long absence, Diana revisits the tunnels...and Vincent, who is finally ready to open his arms.

Poetry by Jackie Kapke. Art by Rosemarie Hauer, Jacquelyn Kapke, Sandy C. Shelton; border illustrations for chapter openers by Neil Farris.[8]

Issue 9

Flame and Shadow 9 is subtitled, "An Odyssey of Love". It was published in 1995 and contains 69 pages. Art on nearly every page by Renate Haller, Rosemarie Hauer, and Jacquelyn Kapke. Also has many photos captured from the series by Gloria Handley.

This volume of poetry was written by renowned English poet, Katrina Relf. She reached in and touched the hearts and souls of all the beloved characters in "Beauty and the Beast". She found and brought to the surface their deepest emotions; capturing them in the printed word. If some of these poems resonate familiarly on your heart, it is because over half of these poems first appeared in the anthology fanzine "Flame and Shadow VI: I Love You".[9]

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 9

Always a surprise, and a good one, this volume of the diverse series Flame and Shadow presents the excellent free verse of Katarina Relf. Many of the poems are tied to actual episodes, actual words from the series, and present the reactions, emotions, and thoughts of principal series characters—mainly Vincent and Catherine, but also Father, Joe, and Elliot—to crucial series events, from the pilot to the end. Two poems are from Diana's viewpoint. Overall, the poems are intense monologues, deeply personal, full of emotion. Poetry is hard to describe; instead, here are examples, a pair of brief, twinned poems tied to the Trilogy:

The Touch of Your Eyes

There is something in my sadness which you touch with your eyes,
Something in my aloneness which reached out to your soul
And it is held close in your arms.
When I am afraid in a night that never ends,
You touch me with the fingertips of your strength
And my pillow becomes your breast,
And the night becomes your arms.
I know that I am safe, that I am loved,
That I will never be alone,
For there is no darkness when I am with you.

The Shelter of Your Arms

When the storm rages and the night is all there is,
And I am alone and surrounded by my aloneness,
Will you come for me?
Let me find my shelter in the depth of your arms,
Let me find my peace in the stillness of your voice.
I need you to surround me,
To fill me with your love,
To make me whole.
Only then can I find my strength,
Only then can I face the night.
Hold my hand and hold my heart,
Take my soul and take my life,
For without you there is nothing.

Toward the end of the poem cycle, although Vincent himself is sure he'll never love again and is grieved by the inevitability of disappointing Diana, others are apparently not so sure— Father, for instance. So one can read the final poems as confirmation of one's preconceptions, whatever they be.

Excellent reading throughout. It's good to have this fine poet's work gathered into one place rather than scattered through innumerable zines. Highly recommended. Art by Renate Haller, Rosemarie Hauer, and Jacquelyn Kapke. Also has many photos captured from the series by Gloria Handley.[10]

Issue 10

Flame and Shadow 10 is subtitled, "Ten for the Tenth Hour". It was published in 1996 and contains 115 pages.

  • Not Even the Rain by Sue Haley and Amber James--A parallel of the uneasiness of two couples, Laura and Jerry, and Catherine and Vincent, concerning the thought of having a child who might be, in some fashion, handicapped. (reprinted from Masquerades '93)
  • Escape the Pina Colada Song by Roseann Solnica
  • A Mouse that Roared by Sharon Lowry
  • The Kindness of Strangers by Jackie Kapke
  • Eternity in an Hour by Sue Haley
  • Kindred by Melissa Prideaux
  • Til' Truth Makes All Things Plain by Melissa Prideau with Gaye Markov (an extended version of this appears in The Rose Journal)
  • Of Fire and Tears by Katrina Relf
  • Welcome, poem by Joanne Batruch
  • Home at Last, poem by Joanne Batruch
  • Analysis, poem by Joanne Batruch
  • He Understood, poem by Joanne Batruch
  • If He Only Knew, poem by Joanne Batruch

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 10

This pleasant issue of the usually all-season zine is strictly Classic. It contains, not surprisingly, ten offerings of fiction and poetry. The most substantial of the stories is “Not Even the Rain,” by Sue Haley and Amber James, which insightfully parallels the uneasiness of two couples, Laura and Jerry, and Catherine and Vincent, concerning the thought of having a child who might be, in some fashion, handicapped. In Roseann Solnica’s “Escape (the pina colada story),” when fan Debra’s husband objects to her purchase of a B&B fanzine, she retreats in misery...and finds herself greeted by Vincent and welcomed by the tunnel community who are, of course, all real. Sharon Lowy’s “A Mouse That Roared” presents the predicament of Mouse coping with a pregnant raccoon (Mrs. Arthur: “Lady Guinea Pig”), funny misunderstandings involving Jamie, and the prospect of Father’s wrath. Jackie Kapke’s “The Kindness of Strangers” has Vincent shot by a colleague of Hughes and kindly cared for by the medically trained proprietors of a soup kitchen. In Sue Haley’s “Eternity in an Hour” Father rereads snippets from his old journals, and in Melissa Prideaux’ “Kindred,” tunnel-raised vet Mattea is dismayed to find a mute female counterpart to Vincent in a circus cage. Poetry includes serious work by Ben Bock, and also his B&B parody of “The Raven,” “The Haven.” Also poetry by Katarina Relf and a cluster of startling 55-word stories by Joanne Batruch. Art by Phyllis Berwick, Sharon Lowy, Jacquelyn Kapke, and graphics by Gloria Handley.[11]

Issue 11

Flame and Shadow 11 is subtitled, "Encounters". It was published in 1996 and contains 176 pages. Sparse art by Rita Klemp, and some decorative borders.

front cover of issue #11
frontispiece of issue #11
The editorial:

Seven come eleven -- a dice thrower's chant that could be applied to this eleventh edition of the Flame and Shadow series: there are seven authors in this eleventh edition (well. okay, so there are eight authors listed. However, since I am publisher, I don't count myself in the final tally.) Five of the contributors are from the United States and the remaining three come from overseas. You are all familiar with the powerful poetry of Katrina Relfand those of you who know Amber James, Great Britain, need no introduction to this lady's sensual poetry and prose. The modem medium of electronic mail was the catalyst for bringing two other new authors to the pages of this series: James Nelson, from the U.S., and Ina Schaefer, from Germany.

The three poems by James Nelson are spawn of the electronic age. James' poems were discovered on one of the Beauty and the Beast boards and after being contacted by the publisher, he kindly consented to allow them to be published. However, when the time came to send him his complimentary copy of this book, a problem developed: when e-mailing James to get his mailing address, he simply disappeared. The e-mail address I had been using some months earlier had apparently changed. (This is partly my fault as I took so long getting the fanzine published that poor James probably gave up on his poetry ever being used!) A call for help was sent out, but none of the e-mail addresses worked. So I'm asking for help in this regard. If anyone knows what has happened to James, please have him contact me at my e-mail address: [redacted].

Many thanks to all of you treasured readers who have done your part in keeping my dream of writing alive by supporting the past ten editions of Flame and Shadow fanzines. I hope you enjoy this anthology.
  • Later, fiction by Karen Morgia (1)
  • The Call, poem by Ina Schaefer (3)
  • You Come, poem by Ina Schaefer (3)
  • Petals of Passion by Amber James
    • Daisies, poem (4)
    • Daisies in the Morning, fiction (5)
    • Lilacs, poem (16)
    • * Lilacs in the Afternoon, fiction (17)
    • Jasmine, poem (22)
    • Jasmine in the Evening, fiction (23)
    • Orchids, poem (28)
    • Orchids at Night, fiction (29)
  • Poems by Rita Klemp
    • Journey's End (34)
    • An Invitation (35)
    • Memories (35)
    • Two Songs of Flight (36)
    • Small Sacrifices (37)
    • Listen (38)
  • Encounter, fiction by Gloria Handley (39)
  • Poems by Katrina Relf
    • Snow (48)
    • If I Were In Your Arms (49)
    • Torment (50)
    • Lost (51)
    • Only the Silence (52)
    • Thoughts of You (54)
  • To Dance to a Different Tune, fiction by Amber James (55)
  • Poems by James Nelson
    • The Heart's Truth (141)
    • Heart Song (142)
    • A Creature of the Night (143)
  • One Down, fiction by Nan Dibble (144)
  • One Down, fiction by Nan Dibble (159)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 11

This issue of the all-season zine has a lot of variety to recommend it. Most of it consists of two substantial Classic tales by Amber James. In the first, “Petals of Passion,” each section is accompanied by an appropriately floral poem by James, since the story’s organization is to link a passionate (and quite graphic) encounter between Vincent and Catherine to a flower and a time of day. There are Daisies (in the morning), Lilacs in the afternoon, Jasmine in the Morning, and Orchids at Night. James’ other story, “To Dance to a Different Tune,” also has considerable sexual content, counterpointing Vincent’s amorous encounters with Catherine with Catherine’s investigation of a new waif Vincent has rescued—a crippled, suicidal dancer who eventually finds a new reason for living, Below. Handley herself has a story, “Encounter,” an overview narrative of Diana’s thoughts about and experiences with Vincent from her first involvement in Catherine’s murder to Diana and Vincent becoming lovers.

The zine’s other prose is provided by Karen Morgia’s “Later,” a vignette of Catherine and Vincent having trouble leaving for Winterfest since it’s so much pleasanter to be alone together, and two linked pieces by Nan Dibble, “One Down” and “One Up,” based on the premise that Catherine, returned from Gabriel’s captivity, still wants only a platonic relationship with Vincent...and the effect of that on Vincent, and on Diana, who just won’t leave well enough alone.

The zine has strong poetry by Ina Schaefer, Rita Klemp, and James Nelson. Art by Rita Klemp, and some decorative borders.[12]

Issue 12

Flame and Shadow 12 is subtitled, "Flights of Fancy". It was published in May 1997 and contains 147 pages. Its content is Beauty and the Beast crossovers.

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 12

This is a crossover zine, meaning that the stories blend B&B with other characters from other series. If you’re interested in the premise of the zine, you’ll find it lively and engaging reading. Its chief delight is Melissa Wilson’s novelette, “All Through the Night,” which mixes X-files, B&B, Batman, Gargoyles, and several kitchen sinks (a glimpse of Tom Baker’s Dr. Who, for instance) in a complex, well-written, excellently paced, often insightful and thoughtful tale of Mulder and Scully setting out to solve some NY slasher murders. The B&B portion has a 4th season premise and Diana figures prominently in the action...as do Elisa Maza and Goliath, of Gargoyles. Pretty near the whole cast of characters of each individual series is involved, however, in witty and incisive portraits. In Maxine Mayer’s Highlander-based “Adam Pierson’s Dead,” elder Immortal Methos takes a break from “the game” in the tunnels but is disconcerted to find himself being welcomed Below by Snow, now a tunnel-dweller. Nan Dibble’s “Still Life” narrates an encounter between Vincent and Goliath, and their comparing notes on their respective romances, a comparison Vincent finds an eye-opener. Cynthia Coe’s “Dragon’s Remedy” uses a Kung-Fu setting to continue her tales of security expert St. James, now married to Elliot and involved, in this story, a case of computer crime perpetrated by the remnants of Gabriel’s organization. Sharon Reynolds contributes “Golden Light,” blending B&B with Phoenix with an encounter between Vincent and alien Bennu. Gloria Jones’ “Eye of the Beholder” tells of Vincent meeting Sarah Connor, Below. And Sharon Lowy has loudmouthed ALF intrude on the tunnels, with comically disastrous results, in “Wheel of Fortune.” Some stories could have used a bit better proofreading but all are readable and many are entertaining and involving even if one doesn’t know the other series being included. Occasional art by Phyllis Berwick, Sharon Reynolds, and Jacquelyn Kapke.[13]

Issue 13

Flame and Shadow 13

Issue 14

Flame and Shadow 14 was published in April 1998 and contains 176 pages. It has the subtitle: "Come Be With Me."

front cover of issue #14
frontispiece from issue #14

The art is by Kris Farver and Anna Kelley.

  • Alone No More, fiction by Karen Morgia (1)
  • The Cure, poem by Melinda Madison (8)
  • Solutions, fiction by Melinda Madison (10)
  • Snow, fiction by Melinda Madison (99)
  • Ladykiller, fiction by Melinda Madison (110)
  • Objections, fiction by Melinda Madison (127)
  • Someone to Watch Over Me, fiction by Gloria Jones (145)
  • The Bag Lady's Dilemma, fiction by Cynthia Coe (not listed in the table of contents, "NOTE FROM EDITOR: "The Bag Lady's Dilemma" is another in the series of stories featuring Elliot Burch and his lady love St James. Written by Cynthia Coe, these stories have appeared in previous issues of the Flame and Shadow fanzine series. Please send SASE with two stamps and flyers describing the stories will happily be mailed to you. There are plans to collate all of the Elliot/St James stories into one volume at sometime in the near future.") (149)
  • Legacy, poem by Karen Morgia (153)

References

  1. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  2. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  3. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  4. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  5. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  6. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  7. from Flame and Shadows Press: "The above review was brazenly copied from the newest edition of the "Q-Fer" with many thanks to Nan Dibble and her reviewers. from the Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review Online."
  8. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  9. from an online flyer here
  10. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  11. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  12. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version
  13. Helpers' Network Quality Fanzine Review -- 1997, Archived version