Jumeaux

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Zine
Title: Jumeaux
Publisher: Lightning Press
Editor(s): Lynne Holdom
Date(s): November 1977-1981 (Original Issues), 1981-1985 (Definitive Issues)
Series?:
Medium: print
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: Darkover
Language: English
External Links:
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Jumeaux is a gen Darkover and other science fiction anthology edited by Lynne Holdom and contains discussion, fiction, articles, and artwork.

This is the very first Darkover zine containing art, fiction, and non-fiction published, beating Marion Zimmer Bradley's zine, Starstone out of the gate. "Starstone" had been announced way back in March 1976, and it may have rankled Breen, Bradley, and the Friends of Darkover, that another Darkover zine was completed three months before their own publication.

The first public comment by Bradley and Breen about "Jumeaux" included their desire to reprint some of the material of the first issue in their own zine, Starstone, as "Lynne probably wouldn't want to be swamped by orders." [1] It is unknown, if Holdom took them up on this offer. Five months later, Holdom said "I still have about 65 copies of JUMEAUX lying around, and while I couldn't quite take a surging demand [per se], I could use a few orders. JUMEAUX [#2] will have a print run of 200 as well. It may become a collector's item. *hope!* [2]

"Sexism on Darkover"

This zine series includes the controversial article series: Sexism on Darkover.

Not Much "Official" Support

It appears that Bradley and The Friends of Darkover did not give much support to this zine series. It was mentioned only lightly in Darkover Newsletter over the years, and sometimes in backhanded ways.

There was a bit of a spat regarding dealers tables and Darkover Grand Council Meeting regarding issue #7 in August 1979, something that appears to represent this lack of support.

Another clue: when Darkover Newsletter was went on hiatus in 1983 and listed four "other available Darkover resources," this was not one of them.

From the Editor

The editor, in the editorial of the first issue in 1977, explains the zine's title: "Well, I happen to like the sound of the name and ... Actually, it's a French name for the constellation Gemini which is the constellation most likely to hold Darkover's sun... I would have used Gemini as the name of the zine, but that's been taken."

From the editorial from the first issue in 1977:
I started writing other fen and we discussed SF.... I brought up my favorite authors like Niven, Anderson, Bradley, Vance, etc., but for some reason the subject came back to Bradley and Darkover over and over. Soon, I got tired of repeating myself and hit upon the Round Robin format -- something I'm still using though it has its drawbacks. This way I could write one letter and pass it around the loop so to speak. Then I registered the Round Robin as the Valeron Council... Now I was really in business. Too much business. I kept getting letters from all sorts of people who thought that joining a mail discussion group would be fun and who were quite isolated from the main centers of Darkovan communication just as I was. In fact, at one time I had a list of thirty-five people involved but luckily that didn't last... But there are drawbacks to the Round Robin. One is that someone forgets about it and mislays it. RR#1 got delayed a month in Michigan while RR #2 is somewhere either in Kentucky or Missouri. RR #3 is in upstate New York and the others seem to be all frith for the moment, but who knows.... And people get impatient. I get the letters. So this zine is a partial answer. It will serves as a central point for discussion of Darkover and whatever else happens to hit my fancy... It will always contain at least one Darkover article... I might as state right here that I will not include Star Trek related material. Yes I liked the show... but I never got THAT enamored with it and there are scads of Star Trek zines around. Send an SASE to Jacqueline Lichtenberg or someone like her who could tell you more about this. I'm not that well informed.

Dates and Numbering of this Series

This series of zines is quite complicated in terms of numbering and dates and has been described as "bewildering." [3]

When 'Jumeaux' started out in 1977, the editor stated it would be published quarterly in November, February, May, and August, something that did not occur.

There are ten issues in the original run, November 1977 to February 1981. In May 1981, the editor decided to combine and revise material from earlier issues, add some new material and essentially start over in the numbering system. She called these issues Definitive Issues, of which there were ten, perhaps eleven issues, in total: "The Definitive Issues were not necessarily published in the order listed on the front covers, and not all covers include an issue number."

Again, material in "original issues" do not in any way mirror what is in their corresponding "definitive issues."

From the editorial in the Definitive Issue published in October 1981:
When I first started publishing 'Jumeaux' back in 1977, I had no idea how popular the zine would become or how long I would want to continue editing such a zine. Four years later, the first seven issues are out of print and I decided rather than print each of these back issues whole, I would choose desirable articles here and reprint these along with some new material in four definitive issues of 'Jumeaux' of which this is the first although not the first to be published... Besides this definitive issue, there is also a definitive issue #3, a reprint of 'Jumeaux' #5 with a different cover (if you have the original #5, you don't need to purchase #3), and a definitive issue #4 devoted to various aspects of 'Bloody Sun' in both the original and revised editions. I preferred the original myself, but many other preferred the revised. Definitive issue #2 will be out sometime next year... For those of you who ask why I do not republish the whole of each #1 through #7, I will only state that there is much irrelevant material in each of these as I had not fully acquired an idea of what I wanted 'Jumeaux' to be. Therefore there is material on Star Wars, conventions, various other fantasy authors, and timely articles that seem outdated now. There are also several book reviews of Darkover and SF and fantasy. I just didn't feel that a lot of this material belonged in 'Jumeaux' as I now visualize it.

There are also some mysteries involving the publication of issue #8, see below.

Original Issue 1 (November 1977)

front cover of issue #1, Anji Valenza
back cover of issue #1

Jumeaux 1 was published in November 1977 and contains 26 pages. The editor writes that the next issue will be dedicated to "The Forbidden Tower,"... "and will have several comments on it as well as a review by Perry Glen Moore. I also hope to have some feedback in the form of letters which are sadly missing in this issue."

  • Editorial (3)
  • Star Wars: A Review by Dennis Jarog (5)
  • A Star Wars Quiz by Kennith MacKenzie (6)
  • A Darkovan Chronolgy by Andrw Siegel (10)
  • "On the Free Amazons' Oath by John Robinson (12)
  • a review of "A Spell for Chameleon" by Piers Anthony, reviewed by M.E. Tyrrell (15)
  • Cold Worlds, Warm People by Marci Segal (16)
  • Darkover: a Critical Review by Judy Kopman (23)
  • You are Receiving this Zine Because (26)

Reactions and Reviews: Original Issue 1

We have also just received from MZB's hands a copy of a Darkover fanzine—or at least this issue qualifies as such! It's JUMEAUX, published by Lynne Holdom, Box 5, Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442. Aside from a review of STAR WARS and a comical STAR WARS Quiz, there are four Darkover items: Andrew Sigel's DARKOVAN CHRONOLOGY, John Robinson's ON THE FREE AMAZON'S OATH, Judy Kopman's DARKOVER: A CRITICAL REVIEW (mostly demanding more consistency among the books—this writer has appeared in the NEWSLETTER), and an article by Marci Segal, comparing MZB's WORLD WRECKERS with Ursula LeGuin's LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS, a comparison often made verbally or by letter but so far as we know never before in print. It's called COLD WORLDS—WARM PEOPLE, but we can't help wondering why she didn't call it THE LEFT HAND OF DARKOVER? It's a good fanzine; brief reviews can't do it justice. Lynne probably wouldn't want to be swamped by orders, so we're trying to negotiate to reprint the Darkover items in STARSTONE. [4]

Original Issue 2 (February 1978)

back cover of issue #2, Anji Valenza
front cover of issue #2, Anji Valenza

Jumeaux 2 was published in February 1978 and contains 40 pages. Art is by Anji Valenza, Amy Falkowitz and Fred Jackson III.

From the editor: "This was supposed to be the issue on 'The Forbidden Tower.' Well, so much for the intention."

  • Editor's Page (3)
  • Farmer: Maker of the Universe, article by Rich Brooks (5)
  • Comyn Longevity: An Analysis, artitcle by Andrew Sigel (12)
  • Psi -- Magic -- Laran by Dennis Jarog (15)
  • House of Zeor reviewed by M.E. Tyrrell (20)
  • Series: Boredom and Integrity by Marion Zimmer Bradley. In it, she tackles the criticism that her books, which she says she doesn't consider a series, are inconsistent. She touches upon Star Trek and fan fiction. (21)
  • Letters (30) (most of them discuss Judy Kopman's article in the previous issue)

Original Issue 3 (May 1978)

back cover of issue #3, Anji Valenza
front cover of issue #3, Anji Valenza, also used with Contes di Cottman IV #10

Jumeaux 3 was published in May 1978 and contains 50 pages. All art is by Anji Valenza, with one small cartoon by Fred Jackson III.

The editor says she doesn't want any more Star Wars material. She also writes: "I have a feeling that MZB should have mentioned those dragons at Nevarsin. Just imagine what some Darkover fans who are also McCaffrey fans could do with the idea. Well, if Starstone gets a number of Daragon stories, you'll know where the idea came from."

  • Editor's Page (3)
  • three reviews of 'The Forbidden Tower' by Perry Glen Moore, Peter Graham, and Lynne Holdom (5)
  • An Appreciation of 'The Forbidden Tower' by John Hopfner (9)
  • On History, Marriage, and Kireseth by Elyse Grasso (14)
  • An Open Letter to Marion Zimmer Bradley by Andrew Sigel (17) In it, he responds to her letter in the previous issue, saying he doesn't like the inconsistencies. He says: "Some people said we are trying to get you to change your writing style. That notion is like shooting the goose that laid the golden eggs... Given the choice, I'll take a Darkover novel as you write them any day."
  • On Consistency by Katie Filipowicz (19) She, too, comments on MZB's essay in the previous issue: "We have to trust Marion's subconscious mind and accept what it tells her about Darkover... To do anything else is to try to change Marion, and we have no right to do that. But we still have that internal need for consistency. Self-sacrifice for MZB's sake is good for the soul, but what can we do with our frustrations? I believe that the problem is compounded by the fact that the more verbal of us also have a need to be recognized as caring, intelligent people, AND would like to have some little influence on the direction of future Darkover novels."
  • Filling the Gaps by Mary Frey (21)
  • Letters (32)
  • Darkovan Calligraphy by Adrienne Fein (39)

Original Issue 4 (August 1978)

the top half of the back cover of issue #4, Anji Valenza
front cover of issue #4, Anji Valenza

Jumeaux 4 was published in August 1978 and contains 42 pages. Art is by Helen Steere, Anji Valenza, and Fred Jackson III. There are no pages labeled 7 and 8 due to a misprint and there are many other inconsistencies in the numbering.

From the editorial: "I do not intend to reprint whole issues... [and] I am NOT in the market for fiction. Send that to Starstone. I am looking for articles."

  • Editorial (3)
  • Stormqueen, two reviews (5)
  • Stormqueen, An Appreciation by John Hopfner (9)
  • In Praise of Stormqueen by Mary Frey (12)
  • Tragoidia by Elysse Grasso (16)
  • The Whereabouts of Darkover by Peter Graham (19)
  • A Trivia Quiz by Judy Gerjuoy (20)
  • Unbelief in the Land by Dennis Jarog (21)
  • a report for IguanaCon in Phoenix
  • Letters (30)

Original Issue 5 (December 1978)

front cover of issue #5, Michele Rosenberg
a part of the back cover of issue #5, Herbert Summerlin

Jumeaux 5 was published in December 1978 and contains 40 pages. Art by Laurel Beckley, Patricia Munson, Lisa Piquiet, Helen Steere, Anji Valenza, Michele Rosenberg and Herbert Summerlin.

The contents of this zine was reprinted (with a different cover) in August 1982 as "Definitive Issue #3".

  • Editorial (3)
  • Giving All Shoulder to Burdens by John Hopfner (5)
  • Interlacings by Stella Nemeth (10)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part I by Adrienne Fein (11)
  • From Commune to Comyn by Dennis Jarog (17)
  • Tales from the Yellow Woods by Mary Frey (23)
  • Letters (32)

Reactions and Reviews: Original Issue 5

I thoroughly enjoyed John Hopfner's GIVING ALL SHOULDER TO BURDENS — he definitely has a way with words. Before I make any comments on his review of the heroines of this book, let me state beforehand that THE SHATTERED CHAIN is among my least favorite Dark over books (which considering the fact that all the Darkover books number among my favorites of f/sf is still not too shabby a status.)

Rohana, from the beginning I could understand and feel with/for. Magda didn't impress me all that much and Jaelle left me totally unmoved (totally? no, what I did feel was irritation.)

John did bring up a very interesting point that I had never questioned before. . .why didn't the "grabby lout" respond to the most probable loss of his kihar? Obviously, from the written report, the man wasn't in a condition to immediately make his objections to being stuck like a pig known, nor, I think, would his friends have allowed any demonstration on his part to take place right then and there. But the question still remains... why not later? Is there a set limit on the amount and types of harassment that the men of the Dry Towns can inflict upon Free Amazons who have come to Shainsa for the purpose of selling goods? Or is it that the man had not recovered sufficiently by the time the band had left to avenge his honor/kihar?

Jaelle's problem wasn't that she lacked assurance or confidence. She was a child still when she swore her oath. She had not matured enough to realize just what it was she was giving up.

She saw the world from only two windows — that which faces the Free Amazons and the one that looked at life in the Dry Towns. She blinded herself to any other view, any other possible situation. The most unfortunate point of the whole matter is that eventually she began to realize just what kind of chains she had acquired without really knowing what she was doing. It was then that I was able to cast off the irritation and began to respond to her as something that I recognized.

On Stella Nemeth's INTERLACINGS, I find myself in disagreement with her on her interpretation of just who is at fault for Dyan's failings and wrongdoings. Kennard's "fault" was that he loved Dyan-the-boy and didn't really know Dyan-the-man. In this fashion he failed to realize that Dyan was a stranger to him. As his bredu, Dyan received love and trust from Ken nard — and you rarely get suspicious of someone under those conditions. Kennard cannot be accused of laziness but of the blindness of love — and as such cannot be charged guilty of the misdeeds of his bredu.

SEXISM ON DARKOVER, part 1: the beginnings of controversy. My fingers already tremble at the thought of stepping upon this battleground of opinions/views. It being quite some time since last I read this article, I thought it best to sit down and refresh my memory. Now I re member why I didn't bother to make some kind of comment on this before. In many ways, I ag ree with Adrienne on the subject of Camilla's problem. .. "She feared to lose her position, he sense of usefulness and purpose chosen by herself whether she had children or not. . . " ". . .but she also seemed to fear that her pregnancy would immediately and magically cause all her skills and intelligence to vanish! She had no idea of anything at all good about giving birth and raising children. " That's the whole problem right there — not the wailing and whimperings over her being forced to keep that child she was already carrying, nor the real need to have more children for the sake of the colony's survival, it was the simple fact that she just couldn't handle the shattering of her self-image. Adrienne also made one comment that at first made me chuckle, then made me stop and think on its implications... "(No agreement for men to sign?)". I know, put like this the strength of its implications aren't very clear. Let's try it this way: (Portion of Ewen s statement Camilla in LANDFALL: "You surely know that women volunteers aren't even accepted for Earth Expeditionary unless they're childbearing age and sign an agreement to have children?"

Adrienne's comment "(No agreement for men to sign?)"

At first I chuckled my head off while thinking "What for? Do men need something binding them to the act of making babies"? After a moment, I got to thinking about those men who just wouldn't wish to participate in such an activity. It did make me wonder whether or not they (the males who wished to go to the colonies) did or did not have to make the same/similar agreement to give their all for the sake of many. ((I doubt they had to sign anything. Population growth is dependent upon the number of fertile females of childbearing age — not the males provided there are some fertile males. And what of Father Valentine? For that matter what would have happened if there had been a couple of nuns along?))

TALES OF THE YELLOW WOODS: I did enjoy Mary Frey conjecturing though I won't say that I agree with her on all points. When one is faced with a lifespan as long as that of the chieri the need/desire to overcome all obstacles "at once" is no longer there. To speak of the chieri of just giving up and going home is an oversimplification. It has been hinted at in LANDFALL and WORLD WRECKERS that the chieri could have been the fathers of our race. To go through the galaxy alone would take more years than I could imagine. Their search to find a cure for the rising infertility was not something that ended without all aspects being covered. They tried. They had the long life and patience to go into the situation far more deeply than a human could possibly do. Once, after who knows how many 1,000's of years, they realized that there was NO CURE anywhere, they returned to the world they had come from to finish their lives among the beauty of what was home to them. The chieri were resigned to the ending of their race.

They knew it beyond the shadow of a doubt and wished no more to strive against impossibilities. To go back to their cities and man-made (chieri-made) tools would just seem to confront them endlessly with the defeat of their search. To abandon those same cities and artifacts and to be come one with the world of their birth would be more in keeping with the attitudes of those chieris who seem to represent the majority of that race.

On the subject of why the chieris did nothing to assist the humans in their struggles to adapt to Darkover (or just to live in harmony with other humans), it seems to me that prejudice could have played a very minor role in this situation. They were purists and separatists in their own fashion. They did want to see their race survive whole/intact/pure — who would not? (We're not talking about homogenizing of races as is seen on Earth, but the combining of two races that are alien to each other in more than physical aspects). They were not "against" the humans, witness the number of times (which has to be more often than what is recorded in the Darkover books) that the chieri-gifts and chieri physical attributes have appeared in the Domains and all the legends surrounding the chieri saving of those who were lost. Anyway Judith's lover said, — "I fear your people, they are so violent and savage and your minds. . .your minds are closed". That, to me, says it all in a nutshell.

To Linda Frankel's re-evaluation of LANDFALL: Where did she gain the implications that Ewen Ross possesses a neurosis about women in authority and that he can't really love any woman? I do not see where it states (or implies) that he is still afraid of his mother. Also who is it that determines just what is and what isn't morally correct? The morals of this age may not be the same as what is practiced in a later age. If the greatest majority determine that to withhold new life — and the promise of survival as a colony — is to go against what is the greater good, then it would seem that Ewen is morally right and Camilla wrong, though it may seem unfair. [5]

Original Issue 6 (May 1979)

front cover of issue #6, Sue Fisher
back cover of issue #6, Amy Falkowitz

Jumeaux 6 was published in May 1979 and contains 40 pages. Art by Amy Falkowitz, Sue Fisher, Laurel Beckley, Chris Mills, Patricia Munson, Deirdre Murphy, Helen Steere, Anji Valenza.

  • Editorial (3)
  • Book Reviews: The Survivors by Dennis Jarog (5)
  • Wyst: Alastor 1716 reviewed by Dave Wixon (5) (originally in Rune (Minnesota SF Society))
  • The Ruins of Isis reviewed by Adreienne Fein (7) (originally in Tightbeam)
  • Articles: Seedtime by Mary Frances Sambreno (9)
  • A Voice for Ramah by Mary Frey (18)
  • Blowing out the Lamp by Linda Frankel (21)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Parts 2A and 2B by Adrienne Fein (27)
  • Letters (37)

Original Issue 7 (August 1979)

back cover of issue #7, Anji Valenza
front cover of issue #7, Helen Steere

Jumeaux 7 was published in August 1979 and contains 40 pages. Art by Laurel Buckley, Lisa Piquiet, Helen Steere and Anji Valenza.

From the editorial: "I will be taking some copies of this issue to SeaCon... I went to DarkoverCon where the hotel branded me unAmerican for not having credit cards. I was also considered unethical in trying to sell 'Jumeaux' in the huxter's room even though at last year's con, the same person was permitted to sell it for me. Just think, you are reading a zine that was banned by the head of the DarkoverCon committee. I wonder if I should put the zine in a plain brown wrapper?" For a reply to this comment, see July 1979 New York.

She adds: "Don't order any zines beyond #8. I'm hoping to get into the writing field and may not have as much time as before to do a zine."

  • Editorial (3)
  • Thoughts on the 'Bloody Sun,' Revised by Paula Crunk (5)
  • Is Heritage the Master by John Hopfner (7)
  • Beyond the Kadarin by Dennis Jarog (13)
  • The Settling of the Drytowns by Marci Segal (19)
  • The Bodies in the Hidden Room by Mary Frey (26)
  • Some Speculations on Cleindori's Death by Lynne Holdom (30)
  • Letters (33)

Original Issue 8 (August 1980)

back cover of issue #8, FMaki Shimbo
front cover of issue #8, Scotty Matthews

Jumeaux 8 was published in August 1980 and contains 40 pages. Art by Scotty Matthews, Patricia Munson, and FMaki Shimbo.

The editor writes that she was ill all winter and didn't pester contributors to send her anything, hence the late zine. She also apologizes for leaving off the last two paragraphs of Paula Crunk's article from the prior issue and includes it in this issue.

  • Editorial (3)
  • Two to Conquer, view by William West (5)
  • Two to Conquer, view by Paula Crunk (7)
  • How do You Get From Here to There by Patricia Matthews (7)
  • Matrix Crystals, a study by Kathleen Woodbury (13)
  • Character Studies of Jaelle n'ha Melora and Dyan Ardais by P.W. Duncan (19)
  • The Short Fiction of M.Z. Bradley by Jeffrey S. Kasten (23)
  • A Reply to Adrienne by Patricia Matthews (33)
  • Letters (35)

Original Issue 9 (November 1980)

back cover of issue #9, Linda Leach
front cover of issue #9, Fa Shimbo

Jumeaux 9 was published in November 1980 and contains 45 pages. Art by Fa Shimbo, Linda Leach, Scotty Matthews, Patricia Munson, and Helen Steere.

  • Editorial (3)
  • Stormqueen! A Classical Tragedy by Kathleen Woodbury (5)
  • Comyn Longevity, an Analysis by Andrew Sigel (10) (a reprint from Original Issue #2)
  • Character Study: Dezi Leynier by P.W. Duncan (13)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part IV by Linda Frankel (17)
  • Series: Boredom and Integrity by Marion Zimmer Bradley (29) (a reprint from Original Issue #2)
  • Letters (30)

Original Issue 10 (February 1981)

back cover of issue #10, Shona Jackson
front cover of issue #10, Shona Jackson

Jumeaux 10 was published in February 1981 and contains 44 pages. Art by Shona Jackson, Helen Steere, Michaela Duncan, Pat Munson and Diana Compel.

  • Editorial by Lynne Holdom (3)
  • He's Really Not So Bad Once You Get to Know Him by Mary Frey (5)
  • Occult Wisdom and Matrix Technology by John Shimwell (8)
  • Character Studies: Kennard Alton and Kyril Ardais (14)
  • Art Portfolio by Shona Jackson (20)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part V by Linda Frankel (25)
  • I Am by Diana Compel (34)
  • Letters by MZB and others (35) (The MZB Consistency Debate is still going strong.)
One fan writes:
A novel is the property of its author, who allows it to be read for a fee. However harsh and sordid this may seem to esthetes, this is a commercial transaction, reciprocal altruism. The author will be permitted to continue eating and the reader enjoys the privilege of harassing the author, a right the buyer has paid for. An auctorial response to criticism is usually special pleading, based on things by no means apparent to the read, at least initially. Such, for example, may be the reader's moral, emotional or esthetic values. The situation can readily amended by the inclusion of an explanatory essay in the book... It is an obligation of the writer to reconcile, for the reader, this inconsistency. MZB asks, 'Why not play the game by my rules...?' An obvious is this -- What are MZB's rules? The answer is immediate -- they are in the introductory essay that did not accompany the novel. They are, in part, in Jumeaux #9. MZB herself has a lengthy letter taking issue with some points in the controversial series of essays by Frankel regarding sexism. MZB writes in length about gender and and sexism in Darkover: "Some lesbians want to be men; I have known them. Some just want to be women in their own way. I have known them too. Some women want to be men without being lesbians, and that's okay too. And some women want to be women without having their hair curled or wearing nylons, and that ought to be okay but in our society it isn't, and mores the the pity!... I write about sexism because that is the world I know. In a way I find it flattering that people find my world so real that they criticize its ethics with real animosity, as if I had created something wicked and worthy of reform. In another, it makes me somewhat angry; they assume that because I write flatly, of the world I know, I therefore approve it. I write about it, because it is THERE. Darkover is a sexist world because I grew up in a sexist world. Do you honestly thing that if I 'reformed' it to conform with all you prejudices, that would alter the outer world?Yes, you probably say, but MZB should make it clear that she disapproves of all these sexist things on Darkover as on USA 1980. Why? I write to raise questions in your mind, not to provide you with answers about how to get from here to there. I don't want Darkover to be the 'there' paradise to which you all escape."

Reactions and Reviews: Original Issue 10

As a new reader of both the Darkover series and of JUMEAUX, I am thoroughly enjoying going through both. I particularly like the series SEXISM ON DARKOVER and the character sketches but practically everything is interesting. So I was rather amazed to read Nancy dell' Aquila's letter. I don't always agree with Linda Frankel either. Quite the contrary. But I always find her ideas interesting. And Nancy, I agree with you that Darilyn and Menella don't seem to be a "male/female" pair, but I did think they were lesbian lovers since "freemate" is a form of marriage and in FORBIDDEN TOWER it states that freemate marriage is not valid unless consummated. Regis rather nasty to Melora. There might be extenuating circumstances, but I sure wished Melora would tell him off. But then I don't like Regis much and I read about him in the order HERITAGE OF HASTUR, SHARRA'S EXILE, WORLD WRECKERS. He seems to want to use women to avoid something nasty like marriage. This is sensitivity??!! Phooey.

Maybe part of the reason I like the series is that I am being subjected to sexism You see, I want to be a research chemist or a medical researcher. Fine. But my parents don't see it that way. If my brother George had that ambition, they'd cheer, but me.... They think I should be interested in boys, clothes, sewing, babies and homemaking instead of science. My relatives think I'm weird and unless I'm mistaken as to the meaning of a certain Arabic word, they also think I'll end up gay if I pursue my dreams. I like boys (well some of them), but I don't want to give up my dreams and ambitions for them or to get married and have babies. So I like seeing how Darkovans or anyone copes with this problem. And I also like Linda's pointing up a lot of the problems even when I disagree with her. I wish I could be like Nancy dell' Aquila and say I've never felt discriminated against because I'm female, but it wouldn't be the truth and I'm not even out of high school yet.

I also like the Character Sketches. I am very bad at guessing motivations unless it is really spelled out for me. I particularly liked the study of Kyril Ardais because I didn't think there was anything good to say about him. I feel the same about Bard di Asturien who Isn't as bad as Kyril Ardais but then you have to spend so much time with Bard. Yetch! Mary's article did give me a line on some of my male classmates though.

I am not a fan of FORBIDDEN TOWER either. There seemed to be too much agonizing. I did sort of feel sorry for Andrew at times being subjected to all this. But I do like all the other Darkover novels. Honest. Maybe I'm not sensitive enough to appreciate the FORBIDDEN TOWER group.

One person I wish I knew more about was Missy in WORLD WRECKERS. I felt sorry for her and for Andrea Clossen. I guess I saw them as victims of circumstances.

I kept hoping that some research fertility would help Missy have a child. But then she's got a long life ahead of her so maybe... See why I like the idea of medical research? ((Now you see why editors get grey hair. What one person likes another doesn't.)) [6]

Definitive Issue 1 (October 1981)

back cover of Definitive Issue #1, Fa Shimbo
front cover of Definitive Issue #1, Cathye Feraci

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 1 was published in October 1981. The editor's comments make this appear to be the first issue in the new series, but in reality, the "first" issue was in May 1981.

Art by Shona Jackson, Linda Leach, Rob Miller III, Fa Shimbo, Helen Steere, Cathye Feraci.

There are no letters.

  • Editorial (3)
  • Through Darkest Darkover with Gun and Camera by Roberta Rogow (5)
  • Do You Speak Darkovan? by John Shimwell (7)
  • Filling the Gaps by Mary Frey (14)
  • The Border Country by Linda Frankel (25)
  • A Basis for a Legend by Kathleen Woodbury (31)
  • Of History, Marriage and Kireseth by Elyse Grasso (32)
  • The Compact, Some Speculations by Philip McGregor (34)
  • The Settling of the Drytowns by Marci Segal (37)

Reactions and Reviews: Definitive Issue 1

I agree that, to my way of thinking, SHARRA'S EXILE was not as good as SWORD OF ALDONES. Nearly everyone that wasn't killed packed up and left the planet, so that by the time WORLD WRECKERS came about, the number of Comyn must be ridiculously few! ((But wasn't that part of the problem?))

WORLD WRECKERS and FORBIDDEN TOWER are my two favorites of the set, but about four are tied for second place: DARKOVER LANDFALL, STORMQUEENI, SHATTERED CHAIN and HERI TAGE OF HASTUR. ((WORLD WRECKERS and FORBIDDEN TOWER are about my least favorites along with TWO TO CONQUER.))

The article on Casta was interesting, but I don't know that I'll get into it enough to purchase the dictionary. I barely have time for what I get to now. Still it is nice that a reference work has been compiled, especially considering the number of others doing Darkover stories, providing that everyone's agreed to a standardized usage.

I have always wished for more info on the time immediately after DARKOVER LANDFALL. I would like to see a story or two in immediate follow-up to cover the first few years.

I don't believe that any story portrays the first encounters with the various races of Darkover, excepting the brief encounter with the Chieri in LANDFALL. (Might be some good story material therein-) ((I am looking for stories set in this early period for issue #12 of JUMEAUX. Anyone want to write one?))

Mary Frey brings up a great many points which are easy meat for the inspiration of further stories in the Darkovan saga. If there was a separation, which men and women moved on? If a few malcontents fled, perhaps some women were taken along by force (a la Drytowners), when all else failed, did those who remained attempt a reprisal? Was it a fear, by men, upon the knowledge that, perhaps, a woman first learned to use the matrix- stone that led to the heavy restraint upon women in Darkovan society, or merely the rareity of women survivors which led to a desire to protect the remaining females lest they perish as a people?[7]

I came to the same conclusions as Phillip McGregor but from a different direction. I hypothesized that the Aldarans were not reassimilated into the Kingdoms at the time of the Compact because they refused to swear to the Compact and resubmit themselves to the overlordship of the kings at Thendara. I believe that the reason why other (or no) reasons are commonly advanced by the modern day Comyn as to why the Aldarans aren't in the Comyn any more are two fold: 1) It bolsters their pride to think that their ancestors threw out the Aldarans, instead of conceding that the Aldarans (and many of their allies) successfully refused to be reassimilated into the Kingdom; and 2) They would prefer to dwell on any past, especially recent past, scandalous acts of the Aldarans other than those related to the still painful Ages of Chaos, in explaining the Aldarans' absense from the Comyn.

In my theory, in actual fact, once Tramontana Tower and much of the land and people had been destroyed in the wars with the Hasturs, little laran technology remained in Aldaran hands and much of this vanished in the succeeding centuries until, just before the Terran rediscovery of Darkover, a Compact-like state of affairs prevailed in the mountains. This wasn't because the Aldarans had sworn to the Compact; this occurred because warring with bladed weapons were the most feasible method (archery doesn't work too well when you're shooting up steep hills or into thickets).

((Archery would be very useful in defending a height or a pass though. In fact the longbow used by the English came originally from the mountains of Wales. As to the feelings of the Aldarans toward the Domains and the Comyn, it compared to the feelings of Southerners for Yankees in the post Civil War period. Aldaran may not have sustained the most severe des truction in the Ages of Chaos, but it was in the worst condition at the end of them because Domainers, by then, were observing the Compact in their wars with each other, just not with Al daran, thus giving Aldaran a feeling that the fine words spoken by Varzil were so much hypo- crasy.))

Perhaps the Comyn were beginning to think about asking the Aldarans to rejoin the Compact; and then a spaceship landed in the mountains and the Lord of Aldaran accepted Terran help and Terran weapons in order to defend his lands from bandits (was he so poot a swordsman that he had to resort to diplomacy and non Compact weapons?) The Comyn hated and feared the Aldarans once more, for the mountain folk, too weakened by the loss of laran technology, arable land, and people to threaten Thendara seriously over the past several hun dred years, now regained that capability. Both the acceptance of Terran weapons and the ini tial refusal to swear to the Compact were sparked by the Aldarans' perceived need to defend themselves. The Aldarans may have feared that the Hasturs would break the Compact and destroy them if they took the Compact at face value and disarmed. Later, to repel bandits, ]_ think Lord Aldaran made the best choice that he could in accepting Terran help and weapons. He couldn't expect help from any other quarters. The Aldarans might have wound up better if they had initially sworn the Compact; but the urge for self-protection dies hard.

((There are two other points to consider: 1) The Compact was designed primarily to ban laran weapons, not guns and laser pistols which Varzil had never heard of. (And a laser pistol which emits a steady beam of light could be said not to leave the hand.) Lord Aldaran could have been confused to a laser pistol's status under the Compact. 2) What if a couple of the contacting ship's crew were captured by bandits? Lord Aldaran might not have had much a choice in the weapons used by the Terrans in that case.))

I suspect that the Dry-towners found themselves at a disadvantage when attacking the Domains because their bodies, as a rule, were not able to adjust fully to prolonged exposures to the "bitterly cold" climate. (My Terran persona, Victoria Smith prefers temperatures 5 to 10° warmer than almost anyone else does.) Another disadvantage for the Drytowners was that blood-feud interfered with the formation of large-scale invading forces. On the other hand. Domains fighters may have had trouble with the heat in the Drylands, whether or not they were in armor, thereby giving the Drylanders the advantage in their territory, (and unfamiliarity with desert conditions may have further hampered the Domains' fighters.) As neither side could gain major advantages by attacking the other, the Domains and Drytowners declared a truce.

As the Drylands could not muster enough strength to successfully invade the Domains, the mountain folk were too powerless until Kermiac's time to cause much trouble, and the non human species have had their own problems surviving what with the degradation of large sections of land with the cooling sun, the culture and Compact of the Comyn were able to continue to exist despite that civilization's movement toward a technologically advanced civilization; that is, until the coming of the Terranan. [8]

Definitive Issue 2 (March 1982)

back cover of Definitive Issue #2, Michelle Petersson
front cover of Definitive Issue #2, Hannah Shapero

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 2 was published in March 1982, contains 48 pages, and is labeled #2 on the cover. It is subtitled "Kadarin." Art by Hannah Shapero, Michelle Petersson, Fa Shimbo, Helen Steere.

This is the first issue of the zine to contain fiction.

From the editorial:

Welcome to another issue of JUMEAUX, This issue is the first one to have fiction as well as articles on the various aspects of Darkovan culture. All the material is also related in some way, however tenuous, to SHARRA'S EXILE, the latest addition to the Darkovan saga. It contains enough significantly reworked and additional material to be worth commenting on at some length.

The cover is by Hannah Shapero, who also did most of the interior illos. She also did the cover for the DAW edition of SHARRA'S EXILE, She, like me, Ts' a Kadarin fan, I just wish he'd been given a larger role in the new version of the destruction of the Sharra matrix.

However, to make up for that, there is a short story by Roberta Rogow, "Thumabout" [sic], The people who have read this pre publication, me, Hannah Shapero, a few victims people at Boskone, all liked it, I must admit that I gave Roberta the plot line saying "Wouldn't it be nice if we had a story along this line,,," Roberta said she couldn't write it. But she did. Whatever it is, it's different.

"Railroad Job" by Patricia Mathews is one I read at Denvention, Patricia had all her stories there for everyone to read and she only twisted your arm a little to make yoo do so, I thought this one would fit the theme of this issue very well even if it's definately a SWORD OF ALDONES universe story, not a SHARRA'S EXILE universe story,.

Linda Frankel who has brought you all those "Sexism on Darkover" articles, gives her evaluation of SHARRA'S EXILE from the sexism point of view, (See her remarks on SWORD OF ALDONES in JUMEAUX #4) Paula Crunk looks that some of the implications of the ending of SHARRA'S EXILE, Lew Alton in the Imperial Senate?? Somehow I can't quite see him as a calm statesman, giving advise, making laws, listening to lobbyists, taking bribes.

One of the questions she raises depend on what view of the Empire you have. Bill West, just tells how he reacted to SHARRA'S EXILE, Bill seems to believe that he can't write articles in spite of the fact that all his articles have been well-received so far. At least no one has written threatening letters or threatened to sue. And if I didn't like his articles, I wouldn't print them. Bill also will have story in the next issue of CONTES Dl COTTMAN IV, Roberta Rogow and I read the rough draft at Boskone and agreed that, while it needed polishing, it was basically well written.

Michelle Petersson is a local fan who is an art student at the college about half a mile from where I live. Thus when Bill got his article in late - I had already sent the rest of the issue to Hannah Shapero to illustrate - Michelle kindly helped out with two illos. She also did the back cover (haven't you always wondered what those dragons singing Gregorian chant in Nev-arsin courtyard looked like? Dennis Jarog's article is a reprint from JUMEAUX #7, now out of print. The illustrations are new, however.

Darkover fandom is becoming a well-defined subgroup within fandom. (In fact fandom seems to be breaking up into a number of single author groups but that's another matter.) Roberta Rogow does seem to have put her finger on some of the drawbacks of this narrowing of interest. Obviously all of those associated with JUMEAUX as writer or reader, likes the Darkover novels, or most of them. But there are excesses in any group and these need to be pointed out at times also. On the other hand, there are those whose devotion is such that they will spend three years making up a Casta dictionary and primers to help others learn the language with written exercises and everything. It reminds me of when I studied Latin. John Shimwell's devotion shows through in his article on Casta, Unfortunately most of the characters I write about speak Cahuenga. And is Casta at the time of STORMQUEEN! the same as Casta at the time of HERITAGE? Considering that the English of 500 years ago (About the time Henry VII took the throne from Richard III) is quite different from present day English; even more different in pronunciation that in written form. On Darkover where literacy is almost non existent, wouldn't the language change even more quickly? They speak an archaic Casta at Nevarsin (Casta at the time of STORMQUEEN, frozen in stasis?)

Linda Frankel's article on reality reminds me of the time I did jury duty. There you come to know there are varying views of reality. Would a chieri who lives more in the Overworld than in the world of five senses, see reality differently than a Darkovan peasant? An artist sees a different reality than an engineer. We have to be taught how to perceive. An Indian who was an excellent tracker, missed even noticing the Chicago El on a visit to that city. City dwellers couldn't find their way through the woods or across the plains either. It's all a matter of knowing what to look for.
  • Editorial (3)
  • The Planet is Now Darkover by Linda Frankel (5)
  • Another View from the Reconstruction by Paula Crunk (9)
  • Some Thoughts on 'Sharra's Exile' by William West (13)
  • Beyond the Kadarin by Dennis Jarog (17)
  • Turnabout by Roberta Rogow (26) (fiction)
  • Railroad Job by Patricia Mathews (36) (fiction)
  • two letters of comment (45)
  • Kadarin's Song, a filk by Roberta Rowgow (47)

Definitive Issue 3 (August 1982)

front cover of Definitive Issue #3, Linda Leach, portrays Judith Lovat and her Chieri lover

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 3 was published in August 1982 and contains 44 pages. According to the editor's personal note on a flyer: "The blue zine you saw at Denvertion was Definitive Issue #3 but if you have the old #5, you have the text of the zine. #3 has a different cover and some new illos but it's essentially #5." (She is referring to Original Issue #5.)

  • Bearing All Shoulder to Burdens, a critique of "Shattered Chain" by John Hopfner
  • Tales of the Yellow Woods, Mary Frey's controversial study of the Chieri
  • From Commune to Comyn, Dennis Jarog's look at Darkhovan history
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part 1, a look at "Darkover Landfall" by Adrienne Fein with a postscript by Linda Frankel


Definitive Issue 4 (May 1981)

back cover of Definitive Issue #4, Linda Leach
front cover of Definitive Issue #4, Linda Leach

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 4 was published in May 1981 and contains 44 pages. Art by Linda Leach, Cathye Feraci, Amy Harlib, Shona Jackson, Pat Munson, Helen Steers.

It was the first "Definitive Issue" published.

From the editorial:

Welcome to definitive issue #4. Unlike issue #3, this issue contains mostly new material or substantially rewritten material. Paula Crunk's article on 'The Bloody Sun, Revised' is the only article that is totally unchanged from its appearance in 'Jumeaux' #7."

As far as I know, this is Kathy Gorman's first appearance in any zine. Kathy, also known as Katria Ridenow, will have a story "Once For Duty" in a future issue of STARSTONE.

Mary Frey and I are both mystery fans. We both put our minds to the problem of just who killed Cleindori. A slightly different form of this article appeared in JUMEAUX #7.

Pat Duncan's character sketch of Cleindori is misnamed. It's really an inquiry into the reasons why Cleindori's proposed reforms stirred up so much hatred. Darkovan society is different from ours in ways we sometimes miss because it is so obvious. Pat just completed a study of Church History as is quite evident in his article.

Like William West, I first encountered Darkover through STAR OF DANGER so I also have always wondered what became of Larry Montray. I'm not sure I agree entirely with William's answer though. Both Pat's and William's articles are new with this issue.

The original SEXISM ON DARKOVER part II was written by Adrienne Fein. When I asked Linda Frankel to rewrite it, I expected an article that followed the outlines of Adrienne's. Instead Linda wrote an article covering the same novels but taking a completely different tack. I was particularly struck by her analysis of SWORD OF ALDONES. It will be interesting to re-read this after SHARRA'S EXILE comes out. Her comments on Sybil-Mhari Aillard are certainly different — sort of empathy gone wrong which could explain why so many Ridenows are so rotten and do things that would suggest they never heard of empathy, much less Empathy.

Another newcomer to these pages is Cathye Feraci. As far as I know this is the first time her art has appeared in any fanzine. I met Cathye at a meeting of the New Jersey SF Society. She just loves doing Celtic tracery and drawing dragons.

Linda Leach who did the covers is slowly learning to appreciate Darkover. She just ran into the wrong book to read first. In her case this was THE FORBIDDEN TOWER. I can sympathize sine since that novel is not one of my favorites either and seemed three times as long as it actually was. Over the years of asking fans to name their least favorite and favorite Darkover novels, I have heard all of them listed in both roles. My least favorite is THE WINDS OF DARKOVER and my favorite is THE HERITAGE OF HASTUR.
  • Editorial (3)
  • Thoughts on the Bloody Sun, Revised by Paula Crunk (5)
  • The Terran and Tower Ethics by Kathy Gorman (7)
  • The Bodies in the Hidden Room, Or Who Were Those Hooded Men Who Killed Cleindori and Her Circle? by Mary Frey (9)
  • More Speculations on Cleindori's Death by Lynn Holdom (14) (reprinted, but substantially rewritten)
  • Cleindori -- a Character Study by P.W. Duncan (18)
  • In Search of Larry Montray by William West (22)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part II: The Early Novels by Linda Frankel (25) (loosely based on an article by Adrienne Fein. The editor comments at great length about some related topics in the editorial, touching upon such subjects as pregnancy, abortion, birth control, the number of children women have... "Normally I write comments on all the articles of the previous issue. This time Adrienne and Linda's article took all the space, mainly because I, too, was annoyed by Darkover Landfall though for different reasons than Adrienne and Linda. One thing that really annoyed me was the idea that disliking children is the result of crowding....")
  • Letters (there are two: one is for "Original Issue 5" and the other is about Linda's sexism articles.) (42)
  • Elorie's Song by Roberta Rogow (43)

Definitive Issue 5 (March 1983)

back cover of Definitive Issue #5, Michelle Petersson
front cover of Definitive Issue #5, Jane Fancher

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 5 was published in March 1983 and contains 50 pages. It is labeled issue #5 and "World Wreckers Inc." is on the front cover. Art by Jane Fancher, Shona Jackson, Pat Munson-Stiler, Mel Rondeau, Hannah Shapero, Helen Steere, Michelle Petersson. There are no letters.

From the editorial:

Welcome to the latest issue of JUMEAUX. This latest issue is built around matters brought up in WORLD WRECKERS. Paula Crunk tells why this novel is still her favorite, flaws and all, while Patricia Shaw (originally Patricia Mathews) discusses some of the faults and prejudices of the Darkovans and the chieri. Patrick Duncan does a character analysis of Regis Hastur drawn from HERITAGE OF HASTUR and SHARRA'S EXILE as well as WORLD WRECKERS.

And to continue our practice of printing short stories as well as articles, this issue we have two: "Thendara Mailbag" by Margaret Fine and "The Shadow" by Marion Zimmer Bradley which tells of an incident in Regis's and Danilo's life that took place between HERITAGE OF HASTUR and SHARRA'S EXILE. The story was illustrated by Hannah Shapero who has just finished doing the cover for THENDARA HOUSE due out in October 1983 from DAW.

The cover artist is new to this issue of JUMEAUX. Jane Rancher, who also did several interior illos, is assistant to Wendi Pini at ELFQUEST and wanted a chance to draw her interpretation of some of the familiar Darkover characters. Michelle Petersson did the back cover which shows Regis and Linnea.

In addition there are two reprint articles. One: "Cold Worlds Warm People" is reprinted from the very first issue of JUMEAUX. Since this issue has been out of print for years and had a very small print run to begin with, most people have not had the pleasure of reading this article. The other reprint: SEXISM ON DARKOVER, Part III" is more recent, but seemed to belong in this Definitive Issue concerning WORLD WRECKERS. The article stirred up more controversy than any other before or since.

For those who are curious about how ideas for articles spring up, Patricia Shaw's was occasioned by an article in FOUR MOONS FORUM #4, published by Ingrid Maack [address redacted] while MZB's story arose from a remark by Linda Frankel in her article on SHARRA'S EXILE in JUMEAUX #2.

Finally I'd like to add that at the moment I am writing this up, I have everything for this issue of JUMEAUX with the exception of Shona Jackson's illustrations. Hopefully these will arrive in time for me to get this issue out on time (for LUNA CON.) I have to get everything else printed up so my printer will not be swamped.

That's it for this issue. There is no lettercolumn this time because the story ran a bit longer than expected but there should be one next time.
  • Editorial (3)
  • If All Journeys End in Lover's Meetings, Should We Argue About How We Got There? (Still Crazy About World Wreckers After All These Years.) by Paula Crunk, article (5)
  • Surprise! by Patricia Shaw, article (11)
  • Cold Worlds, Warm People by Marci Segal, article (15) (reprint from Original Issue #1)
  • Regis Hastur: A Character Sketch by Patrick Duncan (22)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part III by Linda Frankel (25) (reprint, "This article stirred up more controversy than any other before or since." -- from editorial)
  • The Shadow, fiction by Marion Zimmer Bradley (33)
  • Postmarked Thendra, fiction, by Margaret Fine (48)

Reactions and Reviews: Definitive Issue 5

I thoroughly enjoyed John Hopfner's GIVING ALL SHOULDER TO BURDENS — he definately has a way with words. Before I make any comments on his review of the heroines of this book, let me state be forehand that THE SHATTERED CHAIN is among my least favorite Dark over books (which considering the fact that all the Darkover books number among my favorites of f/sf is still not too shabby a status.)

Rohana, from the beginning I could understand and feel with/for. Magda didn't impress me all that much and Jaelle left me totally unmoved (totally? no, what I did feel was irritation.)

John did bring up a very interesting point that I had never questioned before. . .why didn't the "grabby lout" respond to the most probable loss of his kihar? Obviously, from the written re port, the man wasn't in a condition to immediately make his objections to being stuck like a pig known, nor, I think, would his friends have allowed any demonstration on his part to take place right then and there. But the question still remains.. .why not later? Is there a set limit on the amount and types of harassment that the men of the Dry Towns can inflict upon Free Amazons who have come to Shainsa for the purpose of selling goods? Or is it that the man had not recovered sufficiently by the time the band had left to avenge his honor/kihar?

Jaelle's problem wasn't that she lacked assurance or confidence. She was a child still when she swore her oath. She had not matured enough to realize just what it was she was giving up. She saw the world from only two windows — that which faces the Free Amazons and the one that looked at life in the Dry Towns. She blinded herself to any other view, any other possible situation. The most unfortunate point of the whole matter is that eventually she began to re . alize just what kind of chains she had acquired without really knowing what she was doing. It was then that I was able to cast off the irritation and began to respond to her as something that I recognized.

On Stella Nemeth's INTERLACINGS, I find myself in disagreement with her on her interpre tation of just who is at fault for Dyan's failings and wrongdoings. Kennard's "fault" was that he loved Dyan-the-boy and didn't really know Dyan-the-man. In this fashion he failed to re alize that Dyan was a stranger to him. As his bredu, Dyan received love and trust from Ken nard — and you rarely get suspicious of someone under those conditions. Kennard cannot be accused of laziness but of the blindness of love — and as such cannot be charged guilty of the misdeeds of his bredu.

SEXISM ON DARKOVER, part 1: the beginnings of controversy. My fingers already tremble at the thought of stepping upon this battleground of opinions/views. It being quite some time since last I read this article, I thought it best to sit down and refresh my memory. Now I remember why I didn't bother to make some kind of comment on this before. In many ways, I ag ree with Adrienne on the subject of Camilla's problem. .. "She feared to lose her position, he sense of usefulness and purpose chosen by herself whether she had children or not. . . " ". . .but she also seemed to fear that her pregnancy would immediately and magically cause all her skills and intelligence to vanish! She had no idea of anything at all good about giving birth and raising children. " That's the whole problem right there — not the wailing and whimper perings over her being forced to keep that child she was already carrying, nor the real need to have more children for the sake of the colony's survival, it was the simple fact that she just couldn't handle the shattering of her self-image. Adrienne also made one comment that at first made me chuckle, then made me stop and think on its implications... "(No agreement for men to sign?)". I know, put like this the strength of its implications aren't very clear. Let's try it this way: (Portion of Ewen's statement to Camilla in LANDFALL: "you surely know that women volunteers aren't even accepted for Earth Expeditionary unless they're childbearing age and sign an agreement to have children?"

Adrienne's comment "(No agreement for men to sign?)"

At first I chuckled my head off while thinking "What for? Do men need something binding them to the act of making babies"? After a moment, I got to thinking about those men who just wouldn't wish to participate in such an activity. It did make me wonder whether or not they (the males who wished to go to the colonies) did or did not have to make the same/similar ag reement to give their all for the sake of many. ((I doubt they had to sign anything. Population growth is dependent upon the number of fertile females of childbearing age — not the males provided there are some fertile males. And what of Father Valentine? For that matter what would have happened if there had been a couple of nuns along?))

ALES OF THE YELLOW WOODS: I did enjoy Mary Frey conjecturing though I won't say that I agree with her on all points. When one is faced with a lifespan as long as that of the chieri the need/desire to overcome all obstacles "at once" is no longer there. To speak of the chieri of just giving up and going home is an oversimplification. It has been hinted at in LANDFALL and WORLD WRECKERS that the chieri could have been the fathers of our race. To go through the galaxy alone would take more years than I could imagine. Their search to find a cure for the rising infertility was not something that ended without all aspects being covered. They tried. They had the long life and patience to go into the situation far more deeply than a human could possibly do. Once, after who knows how many 1,000's of years, they realized that there was NO CURE anywhere, they returned to the world they had come from to finish their lives among the beauty of what was home to them. The chieri were resigned to the ending of their race.

They knew it beyond the shadow of a doubt and wished no more to strive against impossibilities. To go back to their cities and man-made (chieri-made) tools would just seem to confront them endlessly with the defeat of their search. To abandon those same cities and artifacts and to be come one with the world of their birth would be more in keeping with the attitides of those chieris who seem to represent the majority of that race. On the subject of why the chieris did nothing to assist the humans in their struggles to adapt to Darkover (or just to live in harmony with other humans), it seems to me that prejudice could have played a very minor role in this situation. They were purists and separatists in their own fashion. They did want to see their race survive whole/intact/pure — who would not? (We're not talking about homogenizing of races as is seen on Earth, but the combining of two races that are alien to each other in more than physical aspects). They were not "against" the humans, witness the number of times (which has to be more often than what is recorded in the Darkover books) that the chieri-gifts and chieri physical attributes have appeared in the Domains and all the legends surrounding the chieri saving of those who were lost. Anyway Judith's lover said, — "I fear your people, they are so violent and savage and your minds. . .your minds are closed". That, to me, says it all in a nutshell.

To Linda Frankel's re-evaluation of LANDFALL: Where did she gain the implications that Ewen Ross possesses a neurosis about women in authority and that he can't really love any woman? I do not see where it states (or implies) that he is still afraid of his mother. Also who is it that determines just what is and what isn't morally correct? The morals of this age may not be the same as what is practiced in a later age. If the greatest majority determine that to withhold new life — and the promise of survival as a colony — is to go against what is the greater good, then it would seem that Ewen is morally right and Camilla wrong, though it may seem unfair. [9]

Definitive Issue 6 (January 1984)

back cover of Definitive Issue #6
front cover of Definitive Issue #6
original art, front cover of issue #6 -- in 2018, the artist wrote: "Darkover, under its passionate red sun, has always had an erotic element in it. This is certainly the intent of the author herself, who was immersed for much of her life in hippie culture and "experimental" relationships, including polyamory. In those fragrant '60s, they took group grope seriously, and ultimately, in a simplification of Freud, regarded all sexual repression as bad. Sex, of various kinds, was considered a form of salvation, where a miserable lost repressed person could be bedded into happiness. This is what's going on in the illustration above. Bradley created a form of magic based on esoteric sexual energy, perhaps inspired by the Indian tantra or the magick of Aleister Crowley. In order to make it work and keep it working, you had to abstain from sex or in the case of high-powered magic users, take a vow of celibacy. But if sex was salvation, then celibacy was a form of sin, and needed removing. This is what the characters did in Bradley's "The Forbidden Tower," a melodramatic tale of a magical vestal virgin type who needed to break free of the old rules and let the magic fly. Under the influence of mind-expanding drugs (Marion lived in Berkeley, California during the '60s) the four main characters have a polyamorous play date awash in psychic energies. I don't know whether this whole thing is, uh, "dated," but it gave me the opportunity to draw nudes. Black ink on illustration board, 8 1/2" x 11", fall 1983. This is a fan magazine cover. "Jumeaux" means "Twins" or "Gemini," as the Red Star of Darkover was supposed to be seen from Earth in the constellation Gemini." -- Erotic Darkover (January 23, 2018)

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 6 was published in January 1984 and contains 60 pages. It is labeled #6 on the cover. Art by Shona Jackson, Hannah Shapero, Fa Shimbo, Helen Steere.

  • Editorial (1)
  • The Forbidden Tower, a Critique by John Hopfner (3)
  • The Price of a Gift by William West (11)
  • Damon Ridenow -- a Character Sketch by Patrick W. Duncan (13)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part IV by Linda Frankel (17) (reprint)
  • Ask a Foolish Question, fiction by Roberta Rogow (29)
  • Tower-Trained, fiction by Susan Ross (46)

Reactions and Reviews: Definitive Issue 6

I am an unabashed Darkover nut, but these [this zine and Contes di Cottman IV) were the first DK zines I've ever read. Now I'm mad at myself for missing out. I won't even leave this to the end: if you love DK, buy these zines'. My training as a critic/reviewer in both the pro and fan world usually compels me to balance out glowing praise with at least one substantively negative point (and vice-versa), but the complaints I have for these two zines are very minor indeed. JUMEAUX 6 stares at you with a lovely cover by Hannah Shapero which not only offers excellent lines, detail, and composition but is also a beautifully democratic interpretation of the "forbidden tower" Circle in the book of the same name, i.e., it is non-sexist. The editor mentions in her editorial that several fans said they would buy the zine just because of the cover. The praise is well-deserved. There are four articles and two stories here. "The Forbidden Tower - A Critique," by John Hopfner, is an excep-tionally well-written piece covering the intricate personalities of the book. Hopfner's skill in analysis and expression are extremely impressive. He must be a pro. It is both scholarly and easily understood by the average reader. "The Price of the Gift," by William West, is a short but cogent piece on the price of living with laran, the Darkovan psi talent. Constant emotional control must wear on the individual to a costly extent, and West's conclusion that those who cannot pay the price should not be faulted is quite sensitive. "Damon Ridenow - A Character Sketch," by Patrick W. Duncan, is a fascinating exploration of a very complex MZB creation — a man whose life choices make him the butt of contempt and age-old prejudices yet who is himself afflicted with some of those same bigotries. Although Duncan writes with occasionally clumsy phraseology, the article is straightforward and perceptive. "Sexism on Darkover Part IV," by Linda Frankel, is the best and longest piece. I know only a few fans who are strongly aware of the issues of feminism, who don't glibly stereotype feminists and feminism, so it's truly a delight to encounter a fan writer sensitive enough to deal with the issues. Frankel's skilfully-written analysis of love, marriage, jealousy, rape, and homosexuality, using The Spell Sword and The Forbidden Tower as its base, pulls no punches. I just wish I had read the first three articles, although —if this one is typical — each seems to be self-contained. At one point, Frankel mentions feminist Susan Brownmiller's theory of rape, and this is the only time Frankel's point of view is unclear. I agree with Brownmiller that our culture encourages violence toward women, which manifests itself in rape. Frankel, a rape victim, says her attacker wasn't "foaming at the mouth and didn't appear crazed in any obvious way." I'm not sure if she agrees or disagrees (or neither) with Brownmiller. She seems to imply that violence necessarily demonstrates itself blatantly, and that rape/violence is abnormal. Yet if so, I think Brownmiller's vision is more accurate: a society that has certain negative values about women will make rape a "normal" (that is, common, inevitable) consequence in that society, as opposed to one with a more enlightened view toward women. "Ask A Foolish Question," by Roberta Rogow, is a fun murder mystery with one particularly nice change (for Dark-over). Throughout MZB's novels and the fanlit, the Terran Empire seems to be made up only of Americans (or British and Australians). Rogow presents us with a Japanese detective investigating the theft of some Terran pistols and a related murder of a Free Amazon's mate. And he is very much aware of his own Asian heritage, as demonstrated in his quarters* decor. While the Free Amazon, Estrella, is a bit too blustering and one-dimensional, the investigator and the story are not. Roberta's good at writing enjoyable adventures like this that have a good dose of cultural comment. (I wonder if Roberta knows "Estrella" is a common Portuguese surname.) "Tower-Trained," by Susan Ross, is a good short-short about an extemely young Keeper of Arilinn Tower, Janine, having to prove herself to the older braggert (and newest Circle member), Domenic Aillard. Its conclusion is strong and the development smooth. Without doubt, the best artwork is by Hannah Shapero and Shona Jackson, whose portraits of the various characters are stunning interpretations. Shapero's illos to Rogow's story also provide fine depth and vision of the writer's words. [10]

Definitive Issue 7 (October 1984)

front cover of Definitive Issue #7, Hannah Shapero
back cover of Definitive Issue #7, Chris Soto
original art of Definitive Issue #7, Hannah Shapero: "I got bored with doing Darkover fan art the same way over and over again so I said, What if Darkover were in a fake nineteenth century style instead of the fake late medieval style of the usual scenario? The young heroes would be dressed in Napoleonic military garb, and they would have those curved cavalry swords that look so good in portraits. According to the author, all firearms and projectile weapons were banned on Darkover so you could get a lot of swordplay. That also meant no cannon. I never figured out whether bows and arrows were included. So here are the two young lovers of "The Heritage of Hastur," dressed in their guardsman outfits with epaulets and brass buttons. The castle is a real one whose image I borrowed from somewhere in the British Isles. This was the cover art for a fan magazine, hence the type panel. Black ink on illustration board, 8" x 11", April 1984." -- Darkover 1800s Style (April 4, 2017)

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 7 was published in October 1984 and contains 50 pages. It is labeled #7 and features "The Heritage of Hastur." Art is by Shona Jackson, Chris Soto, Mel Rondeau, Hannah Shapero, Sara Stoel.

  • Editorial by Lynne Holdom (3)
  • Is Heritage The Master? by John Hopfner (5)
  • Character Studies of Lew Alton and Dyan Ardais by Patrick W. Duncan (10)
  • Seedtime -- a Consideration of Childhood on Darkover by Mary Frances Zambreno (19) (reprint from Original Issue #6)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part V by Linda Frankel (27) (reprint)
  • Demonslayer, fiction by Jude Jackson (37)
  • And Back Again, fiction by Patricia Mathews Shaw (47)

Definitive Issue 8 (August 1982)

front cover of Definitive Issue #8 (August 1982) , Fa Shimbo
back cover of Definitive Issue #8, Michelle Petersson

Jumeaux Definitive 8 was published in August 1982, contains 50 pages, and is a 'Free Amazon Issue.'

There are two "Definitive 8's," the second one printed three years later. Their contents have nothing to do with each other.

The editor writes that she misplaced the final pages of Linda Frankel's 'Sexism' article, so it is missing, and will appear as a double feature in the next issue. This issue also contains three short stories. The art is by Shona Jackson, Pat Munson-Sitar, Michelle Petersson, Hannah Shapero, Melody Rondeau and Fa Shimbo.

The editorial:

It's worldcon time so can an issue of JUMEAUX be far behind? Also you may have noticed that I now have a selectric. Finally. That made this issue much more of a pleasure to type up, believe me. I don't know what I would have done with "On the Free Amazons' Oath" other wise. And Eileen Birkun's story had a great deal of material that called for italics.

And finally the Free Amazon issue of JUMEAUX. I had a great many problems with this issue, not the least of which was my misplacing the final pages of Linda Frankel's SEXISM article. Therefore it is missing from this issue and will appear as a double feature in the next one. There was also the article that Paula Crunk was going to write but... It's a wonder the issue got out at all. My apologies to Linda though and she will get a copy of this zine in spite of the fact that her article isn't in it.

On the other hand, there are three short stories in this issue. I also had a problem getting these. Most of the people I know that write don't feel inspired by the concept of the Free Amazons. So for a long time I only had "The Storytellers" on hand. Then MZB put me in contact with two other writers — the ones whose stories you see here. Eileen Birkun shows us an Amazon in one of the most agonizing possible situations; Valerie Smith's puts a humorous cap on the whole zine. Shona Jackson, who did the illo, really liked the story. Melody Rondeau is an artist new to JUMEAUX with this issue though she has done work on another zine I edit CONTES DI COTTMAN IV. Her style matches completely the tone of Roberta Rogow's story, a story which Mel enjoyed.

As for the articles, Mary Frey brings out some points that are underemphasized in articles about the Free Amazons. Not all Amazons live in the Guildhouse though all contribute to its upkeep. A great many have nothing against a freemate rela tionship with a man and many have children that they rear. William West talks about how the concept and the reality of the Amazons differ and how both strike him. John Shimwell brings his linguistic talents to the Oath while John Robinsor examines some of its implications. Finally Patrick Duncan talks of the various women in SHATTERED CHAIN. The remarks on Jaelle were previously published in JUMEAUX #8 [original issue in 1980] but the article discussing the protagonists of SHATTERED CHAIN could hardly omit Jaelle.

In any case I hope you enjoy this issue of JUMEAUX as much as the previous ones. I would really like to hear from you. I need feedback and any letter I publish

gets the writer a complimentary copy of JUMEAUX.
  • Editorial (3)
  • It's Not Men, It's the System We Hate by Mary Frey (5)
  • Oath Breaker, fiction by Eileen Birkun (14)
  • On the Free Amazon's Oath: Another Viewpoint by William West (19)
  • The Women of 'Shattered Chain': Characters Sketches by P.W. Duncan (23)
  • The Storytellers, fiction by Roberta Rogow (30)
  • The Drytowner and the Free Amazon, fiction by Valerie Smith (45)
  • Letters (48)

Reactions and Reviews: Definitive Issue 8 (August 1982)

Every time I pick up this issue of JUMEAUX, I am impressed by the cover illustration. Although perhaps a bit dark and grim for the cover of a zine, Fa Shimbo's sketch is artistically one of the best things I've seen in a zine for some time. Consider how the costumes of the women are simple and functional. The clenched toes and fists of the oath-taker are evidence of her tension. The darkness of the picture is obviously due to the fact that this scene is being enacted at night, perhaps in a way-shelter, and the only available light is the fire off-right. With that in mind, the shading is magnificently done.

The other artwork in the issue is standard fannish fare, with the notable exceptions of Hannah Shapero's two sketches and the Helen Steere illo for the editorial page. These are very pleasing! (([from the editor]: Since I can't draw, I am always looking for people to do art for JUMEAUX, but the really good artists have a lot of other commitments, I'd love to get Fa Shimbo to do more art but she isn't interested. Hannah Shapero is up to her ears with pro contracts. Thus it goes.))

Reading Mary Prey's article ("It's Not Men...") brought to mind an important point. The Guild acts as a 'relief valve" to Darkovan society, allowing females malcontent with the system an "out". Perhaps if there WAS no Guild, these women would seek to institute social reform and change a repressive, outdated system, rather than merely escape from it. Could the Guild be responsible for the lack of an Equal Rights Movement on Darkover, simply by its existence?

The article by John Robinson and John Shimwell "On the Free Amazon Oath" brought up some interesting points, but I don't agree with all their interpretations. The harshness of the Oath was undoubtedly designed (along with the humiliation of the oathtaking) to discourage the casual applicant. Just because Darkovan fiction has never (to my knowledge) presented us with a story about a woman who gets halfway through the Oath, and then backs out, doesn't mean it would never happen.

Generally, the articles were all quite thought-provoking, but the fiction in the issue was a bit of a letdown.

"Oath Breaker" is another raped-Amazon story, tedious and unpleasant. Some elements of it were well done, such as Larin's using her rudimentary laran to get the knife and free herself. The sand trick, however, was a bit much for an untrained telepath without a starstone. ((on the other hand, Andrew Carr was able to teleport after minimal training so these things do happen.)) I definately think Eileen Berkun should be encouraged to write more fiction. "Oath-Breaker" proves she has promise, (("Oath-Breaker" won a prize in the 2nd Darkover story contest.))

"The Drytowner and the Free Amazon" would have been much more effective if it had been written entirely as a fable, from a narrator's point of view. An example of such is "The Tale of Durraman's Donkey" by Eileen Ledbetter in STARSTONE TWO.

"The Storytellers" was silly, and much too long. Sorry, Roberta; my sense of humor and yours are obviously not in tune. Humor is possibly the most difficult type of fiction to write well.

Productionwise, JUMEAUX is very well made. The heavy paper stands up well to wear and tear, and the printing is fine. ((My printer thanks you.)) Congrats to Lynne on getting a selectric typer. Italics are a very nice option to have.

Only one more suggestion: loose the black border on the right margin and bottom of the page. The larger margin should be on the left hand side, for those of us who like to preserve our 'zines in 3-ring binders. ((I have a terrible problem with margins. I just hate to leave blank space anywhere. Must be my Scottish ancestry.)) [11]

Thanks for JUMEAUX; it was nice to finally see my story in print, even if I didn't quite see my name on the table of contents page -- at least you got it right with the story where it counted. ((Spelling isn't my strong point either, but if it's any comfort, they spelled my name wrong when my story appeared in SWORD OF CHAOS AND OTHER STORIES.)) I like the illo, fits the story perfectly.

Some comments on William West's article: I had about the same reaction to the scene in SHATTERED CHAIN that he refers to; that's where Oathbreaker came from. And I pretty much agree with his analysis of the Amazons and their role in Darkovan society. But I don't consider the Guild a failure. I don't think the Guild was ever intended to be anything but what it is: an opportunity for a few particularly strong-minded women to play a different social role than the rest of their sex. As West says, "Nothing changes"; it wasn't supposed to. I doubt that any of the parties involved in the merger of the Sisterhood and the Priestesses were interested in improving the condition of women in general, or changing the patterns of sex roles in the Domains. They simply acknowledged exceptions to the pattern and wanted to accommodate those in the way that would be least disruptive to society as a whole. This alternative is, in practice, available only to women of certain personality types, the ones who can stand the prejudice of outsiders and fit into the rather narrow standards of the Guild. This may have been set up deliberately, a cynical move to co-opt potential trouble makers; or maybe the founders of the Guild honestly believed that anyone stepping out of her "normal" role should have a hard time of it. The Amazons in SHATTERED CHAIN seem to feel that membership is a priviledge to be earned, not a biasic right of every woman. They do not seem in the least concerned with the position of women in general. Possibly some individual Amazons are feminists, but they haven't shown up in any of MZB's books; and the fact is, conditions for a large-scale woman's movement don't exist on Darkover -- though they might after the Terrans have been around a while longer. In other words, I don't think the Amazons ever had the "ideals" that West (and plenty of others) attribute to them. Seen as crusaders for women's rights, they would be judged a failure, and not even a particularly noble one. Seen as one interesting feature of an admittedly patriarchal society, they're undoubtedly a success. [12]

I think William West has the wrong slant on the Free Amazons. First, he's judging them by 20th century USA standards which they don't fit into. For the most part in the here and now Free Amazons with their Oath and all would be superfluous. By today's USA standards they are unfeeling, copying all the worst faults of male macho and not showing any tenderness as if they wanted to erase all femininity, or what people consider femininity, from their lives. After all, if women give you the same flack as men, who needs it?

I first got a different slant on the Amazons after reading letters from some of my relatives in Lebanon. Now anyone who knows anything about Arab society knows that women are NOT considered equal to men. Women are supposed to have babies and serve men, period. However, there has been a lot of fighting in Lebanon. There are almost as many factions as people. In short, people, even women, have to be able to protect them selves because there isn't anyone else to do it. Children are lucky to be protected. I'm not saying this is an ideal situation, but it's probably similar to the situation during the Ages of Chaos on Darkover. Everyone who was old enough to fight had to do so or was a burden on the rest. in children this could be excused. In others... Obviously these attitudes have carried over into the modern Amazons even though they are not needed as much. In a society close to survival level, people have to be hard, children even have to prove their survivability before they are accepted. In short Darkover is not a rich society like the present day USA so the people react differently.

Regarding Eileen Berkun's story: I thought that the Free Amazons understood that rape sometimes happened to women who were fighters and were prepared to defend themselves. Castration was the punishment for rape of an Amazon which means it did happen. Certainly Larin acquitted herself there. The real problem would be if she found herself pregnant as a result of the encounter. I seem to remember that one of the Amazons suggested that Rohana kill the infant Valentine to atone for his father's (Jalak's) crimes. Much as I dislike to admit it, this too fits in with Lebanese thinking: after all a child can grow up into a deadly enemy.

On the other hand, Dry-towners seem like much too obvious foils for Free Amazons and Domains people in general. Whatever else they would be, dumb isn't one of them and they'd know enough to know a woman or a child can kill you. I keep wondering just where the Amazons and Domainers get their desert savvy... especially if unclaimed women are chained or sold to brothels.[13]

ne of those people who were never greatly turned on by the concept of the Amazons or the Comhi Letzli. Why? Certainly I sympathize with the ideals and many of the practices of such an order. Maybe if I had read SHATTERED CHAIN first in terms of Darkover novels, instead of SWORD of aldones and WORLD WRECKERS, I might have put the Renunciates at the top of my list of enthusiasms. So much depends upon which road any given reader takes to Cottman IV. ((I read STAR OF DANGER, PLANET SAVERS, THE BLOODY SUN and SWORD OF ALDONES all at about the same time and the other novels as they were published.)) As it was, I became more interested in the plight of the chieri, and the complex problems between Comyn and Terranan, between Comyn and Comyn, and, for that matter, the conflicts within the protagonists themselves. With one or two exceptions, my favorite protagonists were male; perhaps, this is a great failing in me. ((If so, it's a failing I share since most of favorite protagonists are male and I'm more concerned with cultural and personal psychological conflict than the Amazons as well.)) On a more personal level, I doubt I could make it as a Free Amazon. I am a loner, unlikely to join even the most constructive and idealistic of social and political groups. I have ideals and contribute to what I feel are worthy causes, including the Women's Movement, but am not an activist. It is for this reason that I probably don't deserve the title of "feminist". I could not participate in a women's commune, even for my own protection and murturing. I can rail just as bitterly as anyone else against our discriminatory and patriarchal society as the cause of all my griefs, but in my deepest heart I feel that I am responsible for my own mistakes. Perhaps this is a fault from my childhood teachings; women of a younger generation seem to see the problem much more clearly than I. But then again, true feminists around my age seem to have cast off the chains of their own social indoctrination.

In "It's Not Men; It's the System We Hate", Mary Frey succeeded almost in making the Order of Renunciates attractive to me. If I were a Darkovan woman, with any opportunity whatsoever to contact the Free Amazons, there's no doubt in mind which choice I'd make versus the traditional female role. Certainly Mary puts her case well. I can see the article being reprinted and circulated among female Terranan civil service workers who might be contemplating a choice like Magdelen Lome's; an excellent recruiting tool, if the Renunciates wish more Terranan adherents or supporters.

I am totally lost in admiration concerning the efforts of John Robinson and John Shimwell, especially the latter. I wish Shimwell would turn his marvelous talents into the service of creating his own universe and society. No pleasurable and/or personally constructive activity is ever a waste of time for anyone; but working on the Darkovan language may not get John where he wants to go, at least at this point in time when it seems we're all wondering if there is any future in remaining writers within the endangered field of Darkover fandom. Obviously John could give so much to the general SF audience, working as an original creator.

I don't think Bill West needs to fear criticism concerning his article "The Free Amazons — Another Viewpoint". I have heard the point made before that the Order of Renunciates falls short of being a truly revolutionary group; that it exists to covertly serve the status quo and that the vast majority of Darkovan women will con tinue to be oppressed (and learn to tolerate, if not love, their chains) while a priviledged free lucky enough to find a Free Amazon Guildhouse enjoy what freedoms and opportunities "allowed" them by their Charter. The point is valid even if I'd hate to see Darkover without some haven offered for the exceptional or thinking woman, I would like to see such as Kindra hang on to their "bitterness", their sense of superiority, if that's the proper term, in regards to "mainstream" Darkover. That atti tude breeds true rebels.

As usual, Patrick Duncan does such a thorough job on his character sketches, he leaves very little else to say. I also enjoyed the fiction, especially Eileen Berkun's "Oath-Breaker"; though it seems to me that Larin's sisters in the Guildhouse would be apt to be understand why she didn't die resisting rape; after all, many of them unfortunately have probably been in a similar position.[14]

ly I'm getting around to commenting on the Free Amazons' issue of JUMEAUX. As usual, the articles are more interesting than the fiction. It seems strange that Mary Frey's "It's Not Men..." should be necessary after all this time, but I guess in view of William West's "The Free Amazons -- Another Viewpoint", Frey's article is not as out of place as I thought at first. What she has to say is so damned obvious to anyone with half a brain -- or is it? Sigh, Maybe someday we can get past the elementary level, but by that time feminist-oriented articles won't be necessary anyway, because the readers will have absorbed the way of thinking and will be able to spend time and energy on other topics (just as it's no longer necessary to keep repeating that slavery is wrong and why it's wrong.) Thanks, Mary, for not giving up on trying to make the basics clear to those who still refuse to see.

As for the West article, it seems to me that he hasn't really thought out the implications of what he's saying. He gives a few examples to show how the characters fail to put the idealism of their organization into action, then undermines his whole thesis with his second to last paragraph. The Amazons, he says, have been carefully restricted in their recruiting; their reputation is generally very low within the society at large, with the approval if not actual connivance of the ruling Comyn; the "trouble makers" are together where the men can keep an eye on them, and are marked publicly as troublemakers. Of course a lot of the Amazons take a very negative, cynical atti tude toward '"legitimate" Darkovan society! What does he expect? That they should meekly be nice little ladies with complete tolerance and understanding of the women who don't join them out of fear and socialization? Those who "betray the ideals' as he thinks they do, are simply reacting in a very normal human way to their status. The Amazons who hold women who "endure their captivity" in low esteem just as a lot of (justifiably) bitter feminists look down on traditional women who cling to their subordinate status out of fear of the unknown, fear of change, lack of confidence due to a lifetime of socialization in that subordination. It may not be right, but it's psychologically understandable. The majority who re main subordinate are making it that much easier for men to justify their sexism, with so many examples to point at -- look, they're happy the way they are; what's the matter with you malcontents? Ideals are wonderful, and necessary for civili zation. But they're very difficult to achieve, even for those who profess them very strongly. Very few people are saints, after all. It's very unrealistic of Mr. West to expect that people who've made a very difficult choice, who've stood up for themselves and thereby made themselves targets for the perpetrators of in justice, will always be superhumanly strong in maintaining the ideals they pro fess. In the face of unending, very deliberate hostility and constant reminders that they, the idealists, could be wiped out if the majority decides to eliminate the nuisance, it's only natural thatjnany of them would be cynical. As for con tempt for the women who choose to remain behind -- the Amazons made a very hard choice, to be independent -- but they made the choice. And if other women in the same circumstances the Amazons used to be in don't have the courage to take the same path, of course the Amazons tend to look down on them. It's very human to consider someone who stays subordinate, as a coward. Bradley's characterizations may not meet acceptable standards for a tract, but they are psychologically accurate.[15]

Definitive Issue 8 (August 1985)

Yes, there appear to be two Definitive Issue #8's. Their contents have nothing to do with each other.

back cover of Definitive Issue #8 (August 1985 edition), Chris Soto
front cover of Definitive Issue #8 (August 1985 edition), Chris Soto

Jumeaux 8 was published in August 1985 and 57 pages. It is subtitled The Shattered Chain.

The front and back covers are by Chris Soto.

It is neither from the original run, nor from the original definitive issue run, and is dated much later than either, making this some sort of "Definitive Definitive Issue."

The editorial:

Although I had already done one issue of JUMEAUX
 on the institution of the Free Amazons, I had
 never done one on SHATTERED CHAIN. Upon
 considering the matter, this seemed to be a mistake, but one that could easily remedied. 
After all, SHATTERED CHAIN deals with other matters besides Free Amazons, interesting
 as they may be. This issue of JUMEAUX picks
 up on these without neglecting the Free
 Amazons.

Patricia Mathews Shaw and J. A. C. van Rhyn both look into the origins of the Amazons, albeit in slightly different places. This is J.A.C.'s first appearance in a fanzine (he did write a letter to MOON PHASES) and I had to twist his arm to get it. He is mainly a fan of the "hard" SF of Heinlein, Asimov and Clarke. Then I "corrupted" him with a copy of HERITAGE OF HASTUR. Heh, heh.

Nina Boal then looks at the Aillard Domain, a conspicuous exception to the patriarchal rule of the other Domains. Nina explores possible reasons for this divergence. Linda Frankel returns with another article in her series SEXISM ON DARKOVER. Linda Stone, an ex nun, looks at the Amazons from a slightly different angle.

Then there are the short stories. "Bride Price" by MZB originally appeared in the Programme Book of the Darkover Grand Council Meeting. I thought that more people deserved a wider circulation. After all, not everyone can get to Delaware for the con. And there are a number of people have discovered Darkover since then.

Laura Thompson's story deals with the Amazons as no issue of JUMEAUX on SHATTERED CHAIN would be complete without at least one Amazon story. Phyllis Fishbein has contributed a truly funny story. Humor is the hardest thing to do well and almost everything I have read by Phyllis has humor in it. I'm sure you will be seeing more of her work. It deserves it.

Laura Thompson's story deals with the Amazons as no issue of JUMEAUX on SHATTERED CHAIN would be complete without at least one Amazon story. Phyllis Fishbein has contributed a truly funny story. Humor is the hardest thing to do well and almost everything I have read by Phyllis has humor in it. I'm sure you will be seeing more of her work. It deserves it.

There are no new artists in this issue of JUMEAUX. But Chris Soto has improved so much that she seems to be a new artist. Melody Rondeau's style fits Phyllis Fishbein's story perfectly. And Hannah Shapero needs no introduction.

I hope you like this issue and do not feel that an issue on SHATTERED CHAIN is superfluous after the Free Amazon issue. Hopefully the next issue of JUMEAUX will be out next year and be on HAWKMISTRESS.

I would like feedback. Do write and tell me what you think of this issue of JUMEAUX.
  • editorial by Lynne Holdom (3)
  • The Free Amazon Oath, calligraphy by Jude Jackson (4)
  • How Do You Get from Here to There, (An Inquiry into the Origins of the Comhi' Letziis) by Patricia Mathews Shaw (5)
  • Sisters and Priestesses by J.A.C. van Rhyn (8)
  • Along the Valeron by Nina Boal (8)
  • Personal Freedom: Fiction and Reality by Linda Stone (22)
  • Sexism on Darkover part VI (was supposed to appear in an earlier issue) by Linda Frankel (25)
  • Bride Price by Marion Zimmer Bradley, illustrated by Hannah Shapero (From the editorial: ""Bride Price" by MZB originally appeared in the Programme Book of the Darkover Grand Council Meeting." Note: One of the illos for this story by Hannah Shapero also appeared in Contes di Cottman IV #7 in January 1985 for another story by MZB that was also in the program book for Darkover Grand Council Meeting. That story's title is "Ten Minutes or So." They are, however, different stories. The illos for both stories did not appear in the program book.) (35)
  • Changes by Laura Thompson, illustrated by Chris Soto (42)
  • Business as Usual by Phyllis Fishbein, illustrated by Melody Rondeau (53)
  • Three Amazons from Ardcarrran by Perennelle Doublehanded (57)

Definitive Issue 9 (August 1983)

back cover of Definitive Issue #9, Jane Fancher
front cover of Definitive Issue #9, Melody Rondeau

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 9 was published in August 1983. . It features "Stormqueen." Art is by Jane Fancher, Shona Jackson, Helen Steere, and Sara Stoel. The editor says the next issue will be out early next year "depending on how well this one does."

From the editorial:

With this issue we finally delve back into the Ages of Chaos as we look at the issues brought up upon reading STORMQUEEN. Aside from HERITAGE OF HASTUR, STORMQUEEN is my favorite Darkover novel and I'm glad to finally got to it.

On the other hand, there are many questions raised by the novels. What happens to a society when children are bred like race horses? When children who don't exhibit the right laran are cast aside as culls. This is the plight of the emmasaa examined by Patrick Duncan.

Dorilys's problem is just the opposite. She is the focus of far too many expectations, forced into a role and mold not entirely suitable for her, the best solution to her problem, barred by her father who cannot bear to have a daughter without laran. Why then she'd be no better than one of the culls cast aside by the Breeding Program. William West examines the pursuit of power and what that meant to the people of Darkover in the time of STORMQUEEN.

On the other hand, Darkover's gods are more inrically involved in Darkover's history and may represent the coming of laran to Darkover and the struggles between gods could represent the struggles to master matrix technology Dennis Jarog looks at this question, among others.

Finally there are two short stories. One "Friend to No Man" shows the first generation of Ridenows at Serrais. The other is "The Drylands' Gift" by the ed itor which won a prize in the 2nd Darkover story contest and became available to JUMEAUX upon the demise of STARSTONE. "Friend to No Man" is new and was never sent to STARSTONE as far as I know.

The cover is by Jane Fancher who works as an assistant at Elfquest comics. She did quite a number of the interior illos as well. Shona Jackson has been seen in these pages before. Sara Stoel is new. My printer gave me her name and mentioned she did the sort of art that appeared in my zine. Unfortunately Sara had never read a Darkover novel. Now she's read four of them and will soon be reading more and even plans to attend the Darkovercon this fall. Another person corrupted.

I hope to see many of you at Constellation which I will be attending about a week after this zine is published. I'll be staying in the Hyatt. Hopefully the next issue of JUMEAUX will be out early next year depending upon how well this one does.

Now enjoy!
  • Editorial (3)
  • Sam and the Stormqueen, article by Rick Brooks (5)
  • Power, article by William West (6)
  • Dorilys: A Doomed Princess, article by Patricia Shaw (11)
  • Darkovan Myth and Religious Belief, article by Dennis Jarog (12)
  • The Emmasca, article by Patricia Duncan (17)
  • Sexism on Darkover, Part VII, article by Linda Frankel (21)
  • The Drylands' Gift, fiction by Lynne Holdom (29) (reprinted from Starstone)
  • Friend to No Man, fiction by Kathleen Woodbury (42)
  • Letters (47)

Definitive Issue 10 (June 1985)

cover of Definitive Issue #10, Hannah Shapero
back cover of Definitive Issue #10, Melody Rondeau
original art: "Marion Zimmer Bradley's "Darkover" was a violent place, full of vengeance, vendetta, battles, stabbing, dueling, intrigue, and swordplay. Fans loved it this way, although "Two to Conquer" was more violent than usual. It had a complicated plot about an Earthman visiting on Darkover and the endless battles to rule the "Hundred Kingdoms." The main character was a brutal warrior type, depicted here in faux-Celtic armor and weaponry. I did this elaborate portrait for the cover of "Jumeaux," a fan magazine that flourished in the mid-1980s. Original drawing is ink on illustration board, 8 1/2" x 10 1/2", mid-1980s." - pyracanthasketch

Jumeaux Definitive Issue 10 was published in June 1985 and contains 55 pages. It is subtitled, "Two to Conquer."

The art is by Hannah Shapero, Melody Rondeau, Shona Jackson, and Chris Soto.

The editorial:

One problem with doing an issue on TWO TO CONQUER is that it's hardly anyone's favorite novel due to the unpopularity and general dislikability [sic] of the protagonist and main character. Yet Bard di Asturien is not all that different from Dyan Ardais in the methods he uses to obtain sexual satisfaction. The difference between them lies in the gender upon which they prey. So why is Dyan so popular and Bard so unpopular?

Also do men and women see Bard differently? I did not know. Therefore I asked both a male and a female fan to write views of Bard. I, especially, was interested in the male viewpoint as I am female and therefore "locked into" the female view. I don't particularly like Bard though I could feel sympathy for him since he is in many ways a "victim of the system" as the current popular phrase goes.

When Linda Frankel moved to San Francisco, she seemed to have left her fannish interests behind in New York. At least she did not seem interested in contributing to JUMEAUX. Therefore I asked Nina Boal, another feminist, to take over the Sexism on Darkover series. Linda Frankel may return next issue, however since she has since shown an interest in returning to Darkover fandom. I hope she does as I always find her views interesting even when I don't agree with her. By the way, Nina Boal will have a story in the forthcoming Free Amazon anthology from DAW.

Another new contributor is Michelle Hallett of New South Wales, Australia. I am always happy to gain new contributors and new ways of looking at Darkover. Jean Lamb has appeared in CONTES DI COTTMAN IV although this is her first appearance in JUMEAUX. Karlene Price is new to both zines. All the others have been seen in these pages before, though Jeff Kasten is making a reappearance after a long absense [sic].

The other underlying theme in TWO TO CONQUER is that of the Compact and the personality of Varzil the Good. Varzil has always fascinated me so I had hoped he would have a more major role in the novel. Still, Patrick Duncan has examinated [sic] some of the implications of his reforms in view of what went before and what came after. The Towers were to remain much as he left them until the time of Cleindon, another reformer who met a much less happy fate.

I have spent a good deal of my time avoiding dragons. I am not a McCaffrey fan despite having been born in the Year of the Dragon. I have eaten dragon soup which

is the proper place for a dragon in my opinion. Still , I found William West s story very amusing. When I first saw the title I thought "Dragons on Darkover - Arrrgghhh!" I hope you enjoy it too.
  • Editorial by Lynne Holdom (3)
  • Two To Conquer-- A Male View by Jeffrey Kasten (5)
  • He's Really Not So Bad, Once You Get to Know Him, Or, Bard Di Asturien Finds the Other Side of Midnight by Mary Frey (8)
  • Chains by William West (12)
  • Matrix Technology and Cherillys' Law by Michelle Hallett (14)
  • The Towers and Domain Politics by Patrick W. Duncan (17)
  • Sexism on Darkover, part eight by Nina Boal (25)
  • The Power of Love by Karlene Price (24)
  • The Last Dragon by William West (37)
  • To Stop a Maddened Beast by Kathleen Woodbury (43)
  • Two Parables by Jean Lamb (53)
  • The Marching Song of Bard di Asturien's Army, filk by Roberta Rogow (55)
From the article about "Two to Conquer""

[much snipped]

'What a miserable excuse for a man you really are. . . and he knew it to be true." (p. 273)

This scene in the book truly shook me; I had nightmares for two nights after I read it. Even now, the memory of the overall story is strong enough that I was able to do a ten page paper on it in college without even having access to the book. I think what MZB has done, probably without fully intending it, is to force male readers (of whom most feminist writers could seemingly care less — but then whoever said MZB was 1ike most writers?) to examine their attitudes toward women. Not just their superficial attitudes, such as who's going to cook dinner and change the diapers, but their deep-down, gut feelings toward women. And to put it very simply, I found that mine were horribly superficial and centered on sex.

I think MZB has made several breakthroughs, and one important miss, in her examination of rape through this book. Obviously, for me at least, she has touched on some deeply hidden inner feelings and brought them to the surface. The truth is, I was cheering Bard on through much of the book. I was enjoying his "giving those bitches what they deserved". I was also disliking myself for it, true enough. But in most novels, the attitudes of the male readers reading about rape never get completely dealt with. Take an imaginary mainstream novel of a rapist who escapes prison, has various adventures, and finally gets what he deserves in the end. Justice is done, right? Not entirely. Even if the protagonist gets killed, a male reader can still say "Well, he had a good time while it lasted", or something to that effect. Any feelings he may have had enjoying rape scenes (and I imagine almost all men would have them to some degree) are never fully stamped out.

This is where the science-fictional elements of TWO TO CONQUER come into play. In our world, it is impossible for men to experience heterosexual rape from the woman's point of view except vicariously. But through l a r a n , Bard does just that. I don't have to tell anybody who's read the book what his reaction was, I'm sure. The reason this scene succeeds as well as it does is a tribute to MZB's careful writing of what led up to it. If Bard had been a pure villain, oblivious to every thing around him, his conversion to the "good side" under any circumstances, even these,would have been a lot to accept. In fact,Paul Harrell changes to a good guy at about the same time without benefit of matrix and that I do_ find hard to accept. But I consider Harrell somewhat more peripheral to the story than MZB probably intended.

[much snipped]

The problem is that MZB still has not tackled the problem of differing sex drives As far as I can tell, men on the average, are far more interested in sex than women are. TWO TO CONQUER certainly has little real enjoyment of sex by anybody, male or female, so it's not very fair to even bring this up. But this small criticism aside, the story presents us with an extremely memorable protagonist, fascinating supporting characters, and even a period on Darkover we haven't seen in any other stories. I'm glad MZB finished it, since I don't think any male who reads the book can think exactly the same way toward "women enjoying rape" as he did when he started it. I know I can't.

References

  1. Lynne probably wouldn't want to be swamped by orders, so we're trying to negotiate to reprint the Darkover items in STARSTONE." -- Darkover Newsletter #8 (November 1977)
  2. A comment by Ted Bryan in Darkover Newsletter #11, one that still expresses the "hope to reprint some of them in STARSTONE some day."
  3. Jumeaux, Archived version
  4. by the editor of Darkover Newsletter #8 (November 1977)
  5. LoC from "Definitive Issue 4" (yes, printed non-chronologically, see top of this article)
  6. from a letter in Definitive Issue 8 (August 1982)
  7. from an LOC in "Definitive Issue 2"
  8. from an LOC in "Definitive Issue 2"
  9. a letter by Rayna Daughtry in Original Issue 4 (May 1981)
  10. from Universal Translator #23
  11. from a fan's LOC in Definitive Issue 9
  12. from a fan's LOC in Definitive Issue 9
  13. from a fan's LOC in Definitive Issue 9
  14. from a fan's LOC in Definitive Issue 9
  15. from a fan's LOC in Definitive Issue 9