The Lone Gunmen (series)

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Name: The Lone Gunmen
Abbreviation(s): LGM, TLG
Creator: Chris Carter, Vince Gilligan, Frank Spotnitz, John Shiban
Date(s): 2001
Medium: television, comic
Country of Origin: USA
External Links: wikipedia
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The Lone Gunmen was a short lived spin-off series of The X-Files centered around the X-Files characters Melvin Frohike, John Fitzgerald Byers and Richard Langly, who ran a conspiracy nut paper. The series had a much lighter tone than the X-Files. It's considered a part of the Carterverse since it set in the same universe as 'The X-Files.

Originally created by writers Glen Morgan & James Wong, the three men known as "Lone Gunmen" were inspired by a group of people one of the authors noticed at a geeky convention.

The trio quickly became fan favourites, since many viewers identified with the technology adept, nit picky geeks.

FOX cancelled the show after 13 episodes. They got a final send off in the X-Files season 9 episode aptly called Jump the Shark. Langly actor Dean Haglund created an comic titled "The real reason why the Lone Gunmen where cancelled". The Gunmen also made appearances in various X-Files comics.

The three actors also attended a handful of conventions.

The First Episode

The first episode aired on March 4, 2001. Synopsis: "While the Lone Gunmen are thwarted in their attempt to steal a computer chip by Yves Adele Harlow, Byers receives news of his father's death, and the trio soon find themselves unraveling a government conspiracy concerning an attempt to fly a commercial aircraft into the World Trade Center, with increased arms sales for the United States as an intended result." [1]

After the 9/11 attacks in the United States six months later, conspiracy theorists cite this episode as "proof" that it was an "inside job."

A fan in 2002 wrote:

Now, I’ll ask a question I wanted to ask all of you, but couldn’t do until enough time had passed since that horrible day (September 11). But I think enough time has passed for sensibilities not to be hurt, to be politically correct, be tasteful, etc. The question is: Do you think the first episode of “The Lone Gunmen” (an X-Files spin-off. I don’t like the X-Files that much, but this series was hilarious and entertaining) will ever air again?

Here’s why I ask this (for all those of you who haven’t seen the episode): The Lone Gunmen (The bald old man, Frohike, the skinny blond hacker and the CIA agent) stumble upon a terrorist simulation plan of the government while investigating the death of the CIA guy’s father. He later is revealed to be alive and well, and tells them that the plan will be carried out that same night by certain parties in the government. The plan?: A passenger jet is guided electronically to impact on the World Trade Center, staged to seem like a terrorist act. This being a TV show, they barely manage to avert the catastrophe. End of the episode.

Now, bear in mind I watched this episode about 4-3 weeks before the events of September 11. Right now some of you must be thinking: “That’s it! The terrorists got the idea from there! We gotta sue Fox and the X-Files guy for giving them the idea!” (a friend of mine said something like that. Really).

But as I wrote in an earlier issue of this column, it happens that sometimes, you think you have a totally original idea, and then someone else showcases it (Damn you, Joss Whedon! I haven’t forgot about that one!). I doubt “The Lone Gunmen” was a part of the nightly line-up of the Middle-East TV stations.

This surely brings a little concern to writers of every kind: “Should I write totally original, magalomaniacal plans in my stories like that one? What if someone decides to use them for evil purposes? “. Well, that’s totally ridiculous. There’s no such thing as a totally original idea. Something you may think is perfectly reasonable might seem as idiotic or unthinkable for another person, and viceversa. Not because you think of the perfect way to hijack a nuclear weapon and ask for a ransom (“Of one million dollars!”) it means some terrorist will do it. In fact, I think terrorist are more busy mixing dangerous chemicals for their bombs, than reading books, watching TV series and movies to find a megalomaniacal plan to put in motion.

The point is: just because of one big coincidence, you shouldn’t stop being creative. So, go ahead and make your evil overlords, treacherous wizards and greedy companies take over the world in grand fashion. And don’t worry of being an unwilling accomplice in some terrorist scheme (unless, someday, someone offers you a ton of cash to go work on a movie along with other famous artists, composers and writers. Then we’re screwed. If you don’t get this reference, read “Watchmen” by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons). [2]

Pairings

The show's main ship pairings are Jimmy/Yves (Jimmy Bond & Yves Adele Harlow) and Byers/Suzanne.

Fanfiction Archives

Notable Fanfiction

Links

References

  1. Wikipedia
  2. Beyond the Emerald Dawn by Kal (May 3, 2002)