Sol III (Star Trek: TOS zine)

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Zine
Title: Sol III
Publisher:
Editor(s): Rebecca Baggett, Pam Baggett & Jacqueline Bielowicz
Date(s): 1974
Series?:
Medium: print zine
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: Star Trek: TOS
Language: English
External Links:
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Sol III is a gen Star Trek: TOS anthology.

The title is from the quote on title page of issue #1: "Sol III? It's a nice little place, but there's no sign of intelligent life." —- A Martian Tourist

Both issues were originally sold for $1.00 USD.[1]

General Fan Comments

Ms. Baggett has a good eye for layout and fairly high standards for the fiction she edits. Recommended. [2]

Sister Zines

Issue 1

front cover of issue #1, Signe Landon
back cover of issue #1, Signe Landon

Sol III 1 was published in April 1974 and contains 86 pages. Covers: Signe Landon. Art & illustrations: Signe Landon, Cara Sherman. It was printed by the "Garner High School Graphics Dept."

This issue contains a letter sent to Jacqueline Lichtenberg from the National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution in response to the museum's plan to collect "representative Star Trek material" from fans.

letter
  • You are Receiving this Zine Because
  • Enterprise Involuntary (Being an Exercise in Wishful Thinking) by G.M. Carr, p. 2
  • Uhura by Liza Gregory, p. 43 (first published in Isotape #5, January 1974)
  • Trelane and Red Hour by Rebecca Baggett, p. 44
  • Hair of the Dog by Jacqueline Lichtenberg, p. 45 (book reviews)
  • I, Asimov by Becky Baggett, p. 48
  • Scotty's Lament and A Glimpse of Illusion by Liza Gregory, p. 50 (the latter was previously printed in a zine called "The Gilded Cage" #3)
  • Spaceman, Stranded by G.M. Carr, p. 51
  • Who's that Sleeping in the Captain's Bed? by Becky Baggett, p. 52
  • Letter form the Smithsonian Institution, p. 67
  • Talon: Min the Pram-Trained by Cara Sherman, p. 68
  • The Last Word, p. 82
  • Ads, p. 85

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 1

This ish contains three longish stories. In the first one, 'Enterprise Involuntary,' the authoress finds herself on the Enterprise. (Sound familiar?) It's interesting, but a bit lengthy, and this is only the first part. 'Who's Sleeping in the Captain's Bed' suffers because Karina, the main character, is another half-breed, and Spock's cousin to boot (T'Boot?). I found 'Talon' to be the most interesting story of the three, though, again, Talon is a Romulan raised by humans. (Why do we always have half-breeds and the like?) This is also to be continued. In addition to these, Jacqueline Lichtenberg has a book review section focussing this time on the works of Sylvia Louise Engdahl and Marion Zimmer Bradley. Some poetry and short works, nominal but nice artwork by Signe Landon. The overall appearance of 'Sol III' is nice, neat, and a bit formal. [3]

This is one of a batch of excellent new 'zines that have been coming out in the past year or so. Some people have just 'got it', and Becky is one. She's only 17 (or maybe 18 by now) but she writes better than most people twice her age, and she and her high school graphics department print a fine 'zine.

The first story in issue one is a "to-be-continued" story called "Enterprise Involuntary", by G.M. Carr. It's very unusual, in that it deals with the seldom seen lower echelons of a starship crew, namely, the laundry crewmen — one laundry crewwoman in particular, a little old lady refugee from the 20th century named 'Patches'. (I'll let you read why yourself.) It's very amusing and well written, and the conclusion in #2 offers some excellent plot twists.

There's an article by Jacqueline Lichtenberg (Kraith) called "Hair of the Dog", which reviews the books of Marion Zimmer Bradley and Sylvia Louise Engdahl. Next is a short, very funny vignette by Becky, titled "I, Asimov". There are several poems, ranging from fair to excellent.

Then there's a short story by Becky about her Vulcan/human half breed character, Karina Damos, who acts quite human. It's a comedy, though in the next ish she writes a very serious one. This one is titled "Who's That Sleeping in the Captain's Bed?", and you'll be very surprised to find out who (or what) is sleeping there!

Lastly we get another unfinished story, by Cara Sherman, "Talon and Min-the-Pram-Trained". It's about a pair of Romulans who don't quite fit in, for different reasons, and is done seriously, unlike Cara's infamous Peter Sunn series. Cara illustrates her own story and the rest of the illoes (brag) in this issue are done by me. [4]

Issue 2

front cover of issue #2, Signe Landon
back cover of issue #2, Signe Landon, a rare mer-corn

Sol III 2 was published in October 1974 and contains 105 pages. Covers: Signe Landon. Art & illustrations: Susan Armstrong, Amy Falkowitz, Doug Herring, Signe Landon, Elizabeth Schnoor, Cara Sherman, David Winfrey.

  • Enterprise Involuntary by G.M.Carr, p. 2
  • Earthling by Vicki Kirlin, p. 39
  • Sorry I Asked That by Claire Gabriel, p. 40
  • Talon: Whatever Happened to Botany Bay? by Cara Sherman, p. 44
  • Eowyn the Brave by Amy Falkowitz, p. 62
  • The Charge of the Rohirrim by Amy Falkowitz, p. 63
  • Strange New Worlds by Susan Armstrong, p. 65
  • Lest You Forget by Rebecca Baggett, p. 66
  • A Black Hole Ain't Black by David Windfrey, p. 78
  • Lenore: Soliloquy by Rebecca Baggett, p. 83
  • Leonard Nimoy: ISTC '74, p. 84
  • Chekov: On Russia by Liza Gregory, p. 90
  • Miri by Rebecca Baggett, p. 90
  • Nightingale Woman by Susan Armstrong, p. 91
  • Just in Passing by Rebecca Baggett, p. 95
  • The Homecoming by Amy Falkowitz, p. 97
  • The Last Word, p. 100
  • Ads, p. 103
  • Let Labels Lapse, p. 104
  • Hugo Winners, p. 105

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 2

Issue #2 starts out with the conclusion to "Enterprise Involuntary", then an answer to the question "Why Do We Watch ST?" by Claire Gabriel. Then we get an installment on "Talon and Min- the thing's still unfinished, but this one is titled "Whatever Happened to Botany Bay?" (Remember Khan [sic] Noonien Singh?)

Next are a couple of illustrated poems inspired by "Lord of the Rings", by a good friend of mine, Amy Falkowitz. She also has artwork elsewhere in the zine, and a lovely little story about a lost soul, "The Homecoming".

Becky's Karina story is "Lest You Forget", and explores some of the possibilities of a world inhabited solely by women. Becky has some definite, and valid, ideas on the subject.

"A Black Hole Ain't Black" is an odd general sf story by David Winfrey. (Would you believe it's green?)

There's a transcription of Leonard Nimoy's speech at the International Star Trek Convention '74, and then what I consider the highlight of the zine, a completion of "Nightengale Woman" by Susan Armstrong. It's by far the best completion I've read, and a magnificent poem by any standards. It's accompanied by an equally lovely illustration, also by Susan. I think the entire zine would be worth getting even if this was the only good thing in it! [5]

References

  1. Star Trek TOS Zinedex: Contents - S, accessed 15 October 2018.
  2. comments by Sharon Ferraro in Menagerie #9 (March 1975)
  3. from The Halkan Council #2
  4. by Signe Landon from The Clipper Trade Ship #6
  5. Signe Landon from The Clipper Trade Ship #6