Osomatsu-kun

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Name: Osomatsu-kun
おそ松くん
Abbreviation(s): Osokun
Creator: Fujio Akatsuka
Date(s): April 15, 1962 – present
Medium: manga, anime
Country of Origin: Japan
External Links: Osomatsu-kun at Wikipedia
Osomatsu-kun on Osomatsu-kun Wiki
Osomatsu-kun on Fujio Akatsuka Wiki
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Osomatsu-kun is a Showa-era children’s comedy manga created by Fujio Akatsuka. It has received two anime adaptations, one in 1966 and another in 1988, a movie, and a reboot in 2015 in celebration of the mangaka’s posthumous 80th anniversary, Osomatsu-san, which is notably adult content-wise.

Canon Overview

The trouble-making sextuplets of the series, they are 10 years old and in the 5th grade, and were born on May 24. The six of them get along well, particularly Osomatsu and Choromatsu, but there are many occasions where Osomatsu and Choromatsu (or just Osomatsu) will get in a fight with the rest. In the 1988 anime and halfway through the original manga, their spotlight is stolen by Iyami and Chibita due to the latter two becoming more popular characters among fans of the series, leaving the sextuplets to be demoted to supporting characters.

Characters

  • Osomatsu Matsuno, the first sextuplet, the best fighter of all of his brothers, and is partners with Choromatsu
  • Karamatsu Matsuno, a crybaby and is partners with Todomatsu
  • Choromatsu Matsuno, a smart yet selfish kid and Osomatsu's partner-in-crime
  • Ichimatsu Matsuno, the second-best fighter of the sextuplets and is partners with Jyushimatsu
  • Jyushimatsu Matsuno, a shy kid, is partners with Ichimatsu
  • Todomatsu Matsuno, the youngest sextuplet and is partners with Karamatsu
  • Matsuyo, the sextuplets' mother
  • Matsuzou, the sextuplets' father
  • Totoko Yowai, the sextuplets' love interest
  • Chibita, the sextuplets' rival
  • Iyami, the local conman and victim of the sextuplets' hijinks
  • Hatabou, a child with a Japanese flag on his head
  • Dekapan, the local scientist/doctor
  • Dayon, a large-mouthed man
  • Tougou from "The Terrifying Lodger"

Fandom

Osomatsu-kun’s fandom was mainly Japanese and small until the airing of Osomatsu-san, leading to a bump in notoriety in the manga and anime, along with other works by Fujio Akatsuka.

Tropes in Fanon

  • Angst and Darkfic involving various chapters of the manga or episodes in the two anime, such as Osomatsu being traumatized by Tougou (a one-shot character), or Choromatsu going mad from missing Osomatsu.
  • The ten-year-old sextuplets meeting their adult counterparts in Osomatsu-san, who (except Osomatsu) are radically different from the identical children in dress, personalities, and mannerisms.

Japanese Fandom

The Japanese fandom had a small but dedicated following to Osomatsu-kun since the first run of the manga. Osomatsu-san had gave the older anime and manga some notoriety, which led to a bump in popularity for the Japanese fandom.

Chibita's and Iyami's popularity in the 1960s and 1970s resulted in them getting more focus in the 1988 anime.

Western Fandom

There was no fandom for Osomatsu-kun in the West due to the manga and anime not being exported (or at least localized) to Western countries at the time. Spain did get a localized Castilian-Spanish dub of the 1988 anime, which did garner a small fandom in the Spanish-speaking world. The publicity from the reboot Osomatsu-san made references to Osomatsu-kun, which led to wider Western interest in the older media and created a fandom for not only Osomatsu-kun, but also other works by Fujio Akatsuka in general, though they did not garner as much attention as Osomatsu-san.

Shipping

Fanworks

Examples Wanted: Editors are encouraged to add more examples or a wider variety of examples.

Fanworks consist of primarily fanart and fanfiction, though there is some cosplay, manips, and vidding involved in smaller amounts as well. There are frequent crossovers and parodies with Osomatsu-san, other works by the same mangaka, and others.

Resources & Communities

References