Brothers 'n Blues

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Zine
Title: Brothers 'n Blues
Publisher: Carol Hillman out of England
Editor(s):
Date(s): 1980s
Series?:
Medium: print
Size:
Genre: gen
Fandom: Simon and Simon & Hill Street Blues
Language: English
External Links:
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Brothers 'n Blues is a gen Simon and Simon and Hill Street Blues anthology with at least three issues. It contains fiction, poetry, articles, LoCs, actor credits, puzzles, and more.

Issue 1

Brothers 'n Blues 1 was published in 1984 and is 33 pages long.

  • List of Credits for Jameson Parker (1 page)
  • Biography—Jameson Parker (1 page)
  • Better Late Than Never by Carol Hillman (2 pages)
  • List of Credits for Gerald McRaney (1 page)
  • Runaway Home (Christine Jeffords) (12 pages) (reprinted in The Brothers File, 13-year old A.J. is desperately lonely after Rick's departure to Mexico, and he attempts to join him there.)
  • List of Credits for Daniel J. Travanti (Hill Street Blues) (1 page)
  • Blues Guys (1 page)
  • List of Credits for Veronica Hamel (1 page)
  • Crossword Puzzle and Answers (2 pages)

Issue 2

Brothers 'n Blues 2

Issue 3

Brothers 'n Blues 3

  • Into the Darkness by Laura Enright
  • Two in the Bush by Enna
  • Fatal Decision by Carol Hillman and Reginia Marracino
  • In Spirit by Carol Hillman
  • Tardis on the Hill by Sue Ann Sarick (a Doctor Who/Hill Street Blues)
  • Hill Street Blues Episode Guide
  • 2604, poem by Teresa Sarick
  • Trip Wire, poem by Teresa Sarick
  • a scale drawing/layout of A.J.'s house
  • art by Ruth Kurz, Alan and Julie Hancock
"This a British publication that is edited by Carol Hillman who is a avid "Simon & Simon" fan. This zine first started out looking like a very modest homemade affair and in just two issues grew in leaps and bounds with the third issue looking quite impressive and professional...'Into The Darkness' by Laura Enright. Finally here we have a strong-willed A.J. who even though his is temporarily blinded insists on trying to take care of himself. Though I found the end to be kind of unbelievable as a newly-blinded A.J. must tackle and shoot a sighted man in self-defense still it was a very well-written piece. I was ever so glad to see the strong side of A.J.'s character coming out instead of the usual weak and suffering A.J. that I have seen too often in fan fiction. 'Two In The Bush' by Enna. Here A.J. gets a bullet to the head and tries to kill himself when panic and depression sets in over his injury. Rick must talk him out of it while trying to hide his own anxiety at witnessing his own brother attempting suicide. Even though this story has a tone of sadness to it it is very well done. 'Fatal Decision' written by Carol Hillman and Regina Marracino. This a a very well paced action story. Two mysterious FBI agents want only A.J. to help them on a case they are on. This leaves Rick feeling rejected and left out as the two brothers always work together. A.J. realizes the agents are phonies only when its too late and takes a bullet for his mistake. A.J. is found mission when his car is found parked outside of a seedy hotel at the scene of a double murder and its Downtown Brown and Rick to the rescue! 'In Spirit' by Carol Hillman. This one amplifies better than the television series has ever done the closeness of the Simon brother's relationship. Years later after his war days in Vietnam, Rick wakes after a nightmare and reveals to A.J. an odd experience he had back in the jungles of ' Nam. Obviously afraid someone would think he was crazy, he hadn't told a soul about his vision' of talking to A.J. while on night patrol in Vietnam. Afterwards A.J. has a shocking truth to tell Rick as well! 'Tardis on The Hill' was written by yours truly. The story combines the universe of "Hill Street Blues" meeting with Doctor Who's fourth regeneration. The hill is in trouble as a young boy is found dead of a new drug that the coroner cannot identify. The story works in the Movellans from the world of "Doctor Who" what are able to conveniently disguise themselves as modern-day Rastafarians. Though I wrote this awhile back, and despite some rough spots in it, I had fun rereading this story when I received my contributor's copy. Also included in this issue is a complete "Hill Street Blues" episode guide covering titles and air dates from the 1985-86 season. Also poetry includes "2604" written by Teresa Sarick which is a clever file poem after Robert Frost's 'Stopping By A Woods ... ' and 'Trip Wire' which explains Rick's edginess and his necessity for having his gun at his side ever since coming back from 'Nam. There's a complete scale drawing of A.J.'s house and a floor plan including the furniture lay out. There's some nice artwork here and cleverly placed photos where artwork was not available. There's a fine portrait of Capt. Furrilo on pg. 100 by Ruth Kutz. Same goes for her "Simon & Simon" illo on pg. 101 of the two Simon brothers sitting on the pier. A touching picture that shows the brotherly love that is shared between Rick and A.J. on pg. 63 by Ruth. A squad car in action, (p g. 81) no doubt racing the scene of a crime from the Hill Street station by artist Alan. A a nice simple sketch of A.J. by Julie Hancock on page 62. When this zine first started out it was meant to only concentrate on material from "Hill Street Blues" and "Simon & Simon". But recently in order to gather more material for the publication the editor has decided to open up the zine to all cop, detective, spy and adventure series." [1]

References

  1. from Datazine #49
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