NESFA Hymnal

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Filk Songbook
Title: NESFA Hymnal
Publisher: New England Science Fiction Association
Editor(s):
Date(s): 1976, 1987
Medium: print
Language: English
External Links:

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NESFA Hymnal is a filk songbook.

Issue 1

Cover by Frank Sobolewski

NESFA Hymnal 1 was published in 1976 (reprinted in 1979?).

The NESFA (New England Science Fiction Association) Hymnal, first published in 1976, has over 150 songs about various aspects of fandom, including 17 songs about Tolkien's works and seven about Star Trek.

Origins: Microfilk is a collection of over 550 filksongs, printed on legal-sized paper in small text, and distributed with a magnifying glass. It was assembled by Erwin "Filthy Pierre" Strauss, and was very popular as the "everything filk" collection in some fannish communities. (Not that anyone thought it was literally everything, but it was the "here, you need this; there's enough to get you started and keep you going for a good long time" intro-to-filk thing. Many/most were folded into the later NESFA Hymnal.

Issue 2

NESFA Hymnal 2 was published in 1979 and contains 217 pages.

  • Chairman & Editor: Joe Ross
  • Editorial Assistance: Lisa Raskind
  • Programming: Don Eastlake & Dick Curtis
  • Data Entry: Jill Eastlake (with help from) Leslie Turek, Don Eastlake, Suford, Tony Lewis, Wendell Ing, Dick Curtis, Jeff del Papa, Peter Nielson, and Paula Evans
  • Proofreading : George Flynn, Dick Curtis, & Joe Ross
  • Guitar Chords: Joe Ross, Chip Hitchcock, Selina Lovett, Krissy
  • Songbook Cover: Frank Sobolewski
  • Paste-up & Layout: Jill Eastlake, Don Eastlake, Joe Ross, Leslie Turek, Wendell Ing, and Dave Anderson
[The introduction]: It was at the NESFA meeting of 10 December 1972 that Richard Harter first proposed that NESFA produce the "ultimate" filksong book. According to the minutes, Jim Saklad suggested the title The NESFA Hymnal, and Tony Lewis "groaned that he was afraid it really would be called that."

It remains to be seen whether anyone can ever produce the "ultimate" filksong book, but from that brief exchange the word "hymnal" has entered the fannish vocabulary. NESFA has since published a preliminary mimeographed collection under the title The NESFA Hymnal for the Boskone 11 filksing in 1974 and The NESFA Hymnal, Vol. 1 at Boskone 13 in 1976. Later that same year the undersigned was foolish enough to volunteer to take charge of the project.

In this edition we have assembled a much larger collection and have tried truly to publish a "hymnal": a book of songs meant primarily to be sung. While including full music for all songs would greatly increase the size and cost of the book and run us into copyright problems, we have included music for a few songs written to original tunes and have otherwise indicated the tunes to which songs are to be sung. We have deliberately excluded a number of songs for which we could not provide this information. We have provided guitar chords for most songs, and where we could not, we have provided space for you to add your own. (Our chords are not necessarily the most traditional set of chords for a given tune, nor are they the only chords possible, but they will work and are fairly easy to play.) Songs which run more than one page are, wherever possible, begun on the left-hand page in order to minimize the need to turn pages during a song, and we have chosen a binding that will lie open flat.

Of the many editorial decisions that had to be made, one of the most perplexing was how to deal with songs which have many verses contributed by divers hands. On the one hand, we could be completists and include every known verse; on the other, we could be selective and exclude verses which fail to scan, are repetitive, or are just plain bad. In the case of "Young Man Mulligan/The Great Fantastical Bum" we included all verses known to us, as well as the key from Amra which explains most of the references in the original verses (Perhaps the editors of some future edition will be able to expand the key to cover later verses, a project we would have liked to tackle but could not.). On the other hand, in the case of "Rum, by Gum," we were selective and tried to arrange the verses in an order that gave the song some continuity.

"The Orcs' Marching Song" presented a particularly hard choice. George Heap's original verses, along with a few early additions by others, had made the rounds of filksong collections for many years and had become well known. In recent years, however, a much longer version with many new verses has appeared. Unlike "Mulligan," where all new verses have been added at the end, preserving the original sequence of the older verses, the expanded version of "Ores" has I separated and scattered the older verses throughout the larger song to follow the storyline. It reminded us of certain buildings in Boston where the simple beauty of an original colonial structure has been submerged in Victorian additions, also beautiful, but in a different way. We finally decided to publish the short and long versions separately so that each can be enjoyed on its own terms.

While many mourn the passing of much of the old informality of fandom, we feel that the custom of copying filksongs without consulting their originators is no longer a viable practise, if ever it was. We have sought permission to use all songs of known authorship whose authors were still living, regardless of whether the songs were legally covered by copyright. While most writers we contacted replied promptly with their permission, a few never responded, some responded in the negative, and some could not be found. Accordingly, a number of songs which belong in this volume are not here, and we regret their absence. We have been very careful to reach every non-anonymous song writer, but we apologize if we inadvertently missed anyone whose songs appear here.

Our policy has has one beneficial side-effect: Many writers have had the opportunity to correct errors that have crept into their songs over the years, with the result that we have here more authentic versions. While we respect the filk process, we have seen for ourselves how the typos of past NESFA collections have been copied faithfully by others. We have generally followed authors' corrections and, we believe, have thereby enhanced many of the songs in this collection.

Although many songs appear with copyright notices at the end, in accordance with authors' requests, the copyright notice for the Hymnal itself provides copyright protection to everything in this book which is not already in the public domain. Anyone using the Hymnal as a source for other compilations may assume nothing from the absence of a copyright notice on any individual song.

Everything has been proofread carefully and repeatedly, but errors of various sorts have no doubt made their way into the final product despite our best efforts. All corrections, suggestions, complaints, new songs, guitar chords, whereabouts of lost songwriters, postcard bombs, marshmallows, or whatever will be received and passed on to whoever is foolish enough to volunteer to do the next edition.

I wish to extend personal thanks to all the writers who have allowed us to use their songs, to all who have provided addresses of writers, to Erwin S. "Filthy Pierre" Strauss for his extensive corrections to the first edition, to Lisa Raskind for help in compiling and editing songs, to Jill Eastlake for her computer work, to George Flynn for thorough and repeated proofreading, and to all the others who have helped to produce this edition. Without them the excellence we have sought to achieve for this book would have been impossible.

Table of Contents for the Second Volume

FICTION : Young Man Mulligan and The Great Fantastical Bum Karen Anderson (lyricist) Dee Beetem (lyricist) John Boardman (lyricist) Lin Carter (lyricist) Jim Cawthorn (lyricist) Sherna Comerford (lyricist) Ron Ellik (lyricist) James Gordon Dana (lyricist) Dick Eney (lyricist) Marc S. Glasser (lyricist) George Heap (lyricist) Bettina Helms (lyricist) Ted Johnstone (lyricist) Jordin Kare (lyricist) Bob "Ozzie" Osband (lyricist) Bruce Pelz (lyricist) Dian Pelz (lyricist) Joe Ross (lyricist) George Scithers (lyricist) Based on: "I Was Born About Ten Thousand Years Ago" (Tune suggested or parodied) Based on: "Biggest Thing Man Has Ever Done" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Key to Mulligan Note: Detailed annotations for "Young Man Mulligan and The Great Fantastical Bum" The Future History Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "MacNamara's Band" (Tune suggested or parodied) If It Tastes Like Cardboard, It's Sci-Fi! (Skiffy) Murray Porath (lyricist) Based on: "Shine On, Shine On, Harvest Moon" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Dying Robot Based on: "Red River Valley" (Tune suggested or parodied) Riverworld Bettina Helms (lyricist) Based on: "Oh, Shenandoah" (Tune suggested or parodied) Joshua Son of None Bettina Helms (lyricist) Based on: "Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Martian Hydro-Engineering Corps James A. Landau (lyricist) Based on: "Click Go the Shears, Boys" (Tune suggested or parodied) Stranger in a Strange Land Based on: "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Boskone Filksong Seminar, 1973 Conan and Sonya Were Lovers... John L. Leland (lyricist) Based on: "Frankie and Johnny" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Twelve Days of Nismov Will Maynard (lyricist) Based on: "The Twelve Days of Christmas" (Tune suggested or parodied) Gordy's Dorsai Sharon Ferraro (lyricist) Based on: "The "Armour Hot Dog" Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) Jacques Chrétien Gordon Dickson (lyricist, composer) Soldier, Ask Not Gordon Dickson (lyricist) The Ballad of John W. Campbell Joe Ross (lyricist, composer) Kinnison's Band Poul Anderson (lyricist) Based on: "MacNamara's Band" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Longest Song Ever Written Bill Higgins (lyricist) Barry Gehm (lyricist) Based on: "Ninety-nine Bottles" (Tune suggested or parodied) I Don't Understand the Arisians Bruce Pelz (lyricist) Based on: "I Don't Understand the Parisians" (Tune suggested or parodied) War of the Worlds Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "Good Morning, Little Yellow Bird" (Tune suggested or parodied) Our Space Opera Goes Rolling Along Jeff Duntemann (lyricist) Based on: "Caisson Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Outer Space Marines Jeff Duntemann (lyricist) Based on: "The Marines' Hymn" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Man Who Never Returned Based on: "Charlie on the MTA" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Credited to "Minneapolis Faandom" The Zine Called Analog Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "The Wabash Cannonball" (Tune suggested or parodied) Oh, That Lost Sense of Wonder Isaac Asimov (lyricist) Based on: "When Britian Really Ruled the Waves" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) Uncle Owen Had a Farm Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" (Tune suggested or parodied) Way Fall Away Pat Kelly (lyricist) Based on: "Haul Away Joe" (Tune suggested or parodied) I Know an Old Spacer Richard S. Holmes (lyricist) Based on: "I Know an Old lady" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Asteroid Light John Boardman (lyricist) Based on: "The Eddystone Light" (Tune suggested or parodied) The First Time Patrick Kelly (lyricist) Based on: "The First Time Ever I Touched Your Face" (Tune suggested or parodied) This Planet's My Land Dave Carldon (lyricist) Based on: "This Land Is Your Land" by Woody Guthrie (Tune suggested or parodied) Two Hundred Million Million Miles Thomas G. Digby (lyricist, composer) Music notation included A Quarter Million Sunsets Worth of Lonely Thomas G. Digby (lyricist, composer) The Sands of Arrakis Doris Beetem (lyricist) Dee Beetem (lyricist) Rose Beetem (lyricist) Bonnie Beetem (lyricist) Based on: "The Streets of Laredo" (Tune suggested or parodied) Ensign Flandry Murphy (lyricist) Based on: "Dominique" (Tune suggested or parodied) Radiation Blues Theodore R. Cogswell (lyricist) Based on: "Frankie and Johnny" (Tune suggested or parodied) Haec Insula Terra Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "Gaudeamus Igitur" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Bradbury Hate Song Ray Beam (lyricist) Jerry Hunter (lyricist) Based on: "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" (Tune suggested or parodied) Where Can the Matter Be? Don Simpson (lyricist) Don Cochran (lyricist) John A. Carroll (lyricist) Based on: "Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?" (Tune suggested or parodied)

SCIENCE: Home on Lagrange: The L5 Song Bill Higgins (lyricist) Barry Gehm (lyricist) Based on: "Home on the Range" (Tune suggested or parodied) Home on Lagrange: The L5 Song Bill Higgins (lyricist) Barry Gehm (lyricist) Based on: "Home on the Range" (Tune suggested or parodied) Pop! Goes an Eardrum Paula Smith (lyricist) Based on: "Pop Goes the Weasel" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Sounds of Science Based on: "The Sounds of Silence" by Paul Simon (Tune suggested or parodied) Batteries Jordin Kare (lyricist) Based on: "Yesterday" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Perverted Digital Processor Song Jordin Kare (lyricist) Based on: "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" (Tune suggested or parodied) A Programming Carol Dick Curtis (lyricist) Based on: "The Wassail Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) When Harlie Played One Robert Osband (lyricist) Based on: "This Old Man" (Tune suggested or parodied) The New Science Anthony R. Lewis (lyricist) Sandy Lensch (lyricist) Based on: "The Marines' Hymn" (Tune suggested or parodied) It's a Long Way from Amphioxus Based on: "It's a Long Way to Tipperary" (Tune suggested or parodied)

FANDOM: Fan Party Song Laurie D. Mann (lyricist) Based on: "The Ants' Marching Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Worldcon Lullaby Robert Osband (lyricist) Based on: "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (Tune suggested or parodied) Weirdo Sci-Fi Freaks Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "Gypsies, Tramps, and Thieves" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Saga of Lime Jello Fandom Barney Neufeld (lyricist) Based on: "Pop Goes the Weasel" (Tune suggested or parodied) Where's Boskone? Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Based on: "Oh, Susanna" by Stephen Foster (Tune suggested or parodied) The Chairman of the Next Boskone Richard S. Holmes (lyricist) Based on: "When I Was a Lad" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) I Want a Beer Based on: "I Want a Girl" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Elevator Song Bill Mallardi (lyricist) Suzanne Tompkins (lyricist) Jerry Kaufman (lyricist) Linda Bushyager (lyricist) Based on: "Yesterday" by John Lennon and Paul McCartney (Tune suggested or parodied) Slow Elevators Sherna Comerford (lyricist) Based on: "Waltzing Matilda" (Tune suggested or parodied) Bouncing Potatoes Poul Anderson (lyricist) Based on: "Waltzing Matilda" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Veteran Fan Jim Landau (lyricist) Based on: "Both Sides Now" (Tune suggested or parodied) To John Boardman in Brooklyn Fred Lerner (lyricist) Brian Burley (lyricist) Sherna Comerford (lyricist) Based on: "To Anacreon in Heaven" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Wrecking of John Boardman Sherna Comerford (lyricist) Based on: "The Sloop John B." (Tune suggested or parodied) Fandomly Street Charlie Hamilton (lyricist) Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Based on: "Sesame Street" (Tune suggested or parodied) What Song Is This? Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Based on: "Theme from "Exodus"" (Tune suggested or parodied) Oh, Beautiful Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Based on: "America the Beautiful" (Tune suggested or parodied) Mongol's Marching Song Murphy (lyricist) Based on: "Marching to Pretoria" (Tune suggested or parodied) We Are the Other Club Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "He Is an Englishman" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) Onward Goes the Other Club Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "Onward, Christian Soldiers" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) Marching Song of Foofoo Based on: "Onward, Christian Soldiers" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) A Religious Song Based on: "John Brown's Body" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Boskone 8 Blues Ken Johnson (lyricist) I Could Have Filked All Night Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Based on: "I Could Have Danced All Night" by Frederick Loewe (Tune suggested or parodied) We're Getting Screwed Up by This Hymnal Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Charlie Hamilton (lyricist) Based on: "Get Me to the Church on Time" by Frederick Loewe (Tune suggested or parodied) The Ballad of Gordy Dickson Ben Bova (lyricist) Based on: "Clementine" (Tune suggested or parodied) Fanswerwacky George Flynn (lyricist) Based on: "Greensleeves" (Tune suggested or parodied) Marsupial Fandom and Monotreme Fandom Denny Lien (lyricist) Al Kuhfeld (lyricist) Erwin Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "Rum, by Gum" (Tune suggested or parodied) Trufan's Marching Song Ron Ellik (lyricist) Ted Johnstone (lyricist) Bruce Pelz (lyricist) Based on: "This Old Man" (Tune suggested or parodied) Everyone Says FIAWOL Marc S. Glasser (lyricist) A. Magician (lyricist) Based on: "Everyone Says I Love You" (Tune suggested or parodied) Thank Ghu I'm a Fannish Boy Marc S. Glasser (lyricist) Based on: "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" (Tune suggested or parodied) Look What They've Done to My Song Charlie Hamilton (lyricist) Based on: "Look What They've Done to My Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) Tell Me Why This Deep Young Fan Donald Franson (lyricist) Based on: "Am I Alone and Unobserved?" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) Paving the Road to Hell Bruce Pelz (lyricist) Based on: "When I Went to the Bar as a Very Young Man" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) Mention My Name in Minneapolis Based on: "Mention My Name in Sheboygan" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Minneapolis Fandom's anthem Minnesota Fen: or How to Lose Fens and Alienate People Paula Smith (lyricist) Based on: "California Girls" (Tune suggested or parodied) King of the Zines Based on: "King Herod's Song" by Andrew Lloyd Webber (Tune suggested or parodied) The Twelve Days of Solstice Based on: "Twelve Days of Christmas" (Tune suggested or parodied) My Ghod's Better Than Your Ghod Based on: "Ken-L Ration Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Credited to "Minneapolis Fandom" The Vacuum Pump Based on: "Listen to the Mockingbird" (Tune suggested or parodied) Westercon 23: or The Con Co-Ordinator's Lament Doris Beetem (lyricist) Based on: "Battle Hymn of the Republic" (Tune suggested or parodied) Another Weekend, Another Con Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "Another Opening, Another Show" by Cole Porter (Tune suggested or parodied) Great Spider Bless Fanzines Renee Valois (lyricist) Based on: "God Bless America" (Tune suggested or parodied) I've Been Working on the Fanzine Jim Landau (lyricist) Based on: "I've Been Working on the Railroad" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Ballad of Andy Young Ron Ellik (lyricist) Based on: "Rodger Young" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Teenfan Tyranny Marching Song Nate Bucklin (lyricist) Based on: "Battle Hymn of the Republic" (Tune suggested or parodied) Ballad of Egor Clif Flynt (lyricist) Based on: "Rambling Wreck from Georgia Tech" (Tune suggested or parodied) A. R. L. Jeff Speiser (lyricist) Based on: "Clementine" (Tune suggested or parodied) The U. S. Mail Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "Charlie on the MTA" (Tune suggested or parodied) One Fanzine Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "Chad Gaya" (Tune suggested or parodied) George M. Trufan Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Based on: "Give My Regards to Broadway" by George M. Cohan (Tune suggested or parodied) Based on: "You're a Grand Old Flag" by George M. Cohan (Tune suggested or parodied) Based on: "Yankee Doodle Dandy" by George M. Cohan (Tune suggested or parodied) How the Fanzines Come In Don Cochran (lyricist) Based on: "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean" (Tune suggested or parodied) Corduroy Trousers Ted Johnstone (lyricist) Based on: "Black Denim Trousers" (Tune suggested or parodied) He's Got a Whole Lot of Crud in His Zine Blue Petal (lyricist) Based on: "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Credited to "Blue Petal and subsequent filksingers" And This Is One of Them Based on: "Theme from Exodus" (Tune suggested or parodied)

STAR TREK : A Slanderous Song Devra Langsam (lyricist) Based on: "The Sloop John B" (Tune suggested or parodied) Kirk Went A-Courtin' The Troubador's Sometime Cat (lyricist) Based on: "Frog Went A-Courting" (Tune suggested or parodied) The First Days of Our Mission Based on: "Twelve Days of Christmas" (Tune suggested or parodied) Trekkies Sarah Elizabeth Miller (lyricist) Based on: "People" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Klingon Diplomatic Corps Marching Song: or, Imperialism for Fun and Profit Paula Smith (lyricist) Based on: "Battle Hymn of the Republic" (Tune suggested or parodied) We've Got Warships Sharon Ferraro (lyricist) Based on: "I've Got Sixpence" (Tune suggested or parodied) Take Me Home, Starry Roads Jan Snyder (lyricist) Based on: "Country Roads" (Tune suggested or parodied)

TOLKEIN : The Epical History of the War of the Rings: or The Orcs' Marching Song George Heap (lyricist) Ted Johnstone (lyricist) Karen Anderson (lyricist) Dick Eney (lyricist) Fred Lerner (lyricist) Adrienne Fein (lyricist) Dean Dickensheat (lyricist) Dave Carldon (lyricist) Sherna Comerford (lyricist) Fred Phillips (lyricist) Erwin S. Strauss (lyricist) Tamar Lindsay (lyricist) Jim Dana (lyricist) Charlie Hamilton (lyricist) Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "The Ballad of Jesse James" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Long version The Epical History of the War of the Rings: or The Orcs' Marching Song Based on: "The Ballad of Jesse James" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Short Version High Fly the Nazgûl Ted Johnstone (lyricist) Based on: "Green Grow the Rushes, Oh" (Tune suggested or parodied) Onward, Sauron's Soldiers Dick Tatge (lyricist) Al Kuhfeld (lyricist) Ken Fletcher (lyricist) Based on: "Onward Christian Soldiers" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) All You Need Is Orcs Based on: "All You Need Is Love" (Tune suggested or parodied) Smaug the Magic Dragon Based on: "Puff the Magic Dragon" by Peter Yarrow (Tune suggested or parodied) What Shall We Do With a Drunken Hobbit? Based on: "What Shall We Do With the Drunken Sailor?" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Credited to "Divers hands at Mythcon IV, 1973" The Childish Edda Poul Anderson (lyricist) Ron Ellik (lyricist) Based on: "The Ballad of Jesse James" (Tune suggested or parodied) Hooray for Frodo Baggins Marc S. Glasser (lyricist) Donna Camp (lyricist) Based on: "Hooray for Captain Spaulding" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Orcs' Drinking Song Dick Eney (lyricist) Based on: "Mademoiselle from Armentières" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Nazgûl King of Angmar John Boardman (lyricist)

POTPOURRI : Based on: "The Bastard King of England" (Tune suggested or parodied) S-A-U-R-O-N! John Boardman (lyricist) Based on: "M-O-T-H-E-R" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Ents' Marching Song Jim Landau (lyricist) Sherna Comerford (lyricist) Based on: "The Ants' Marching Song" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Bonnie Black Flag Pat Kelly (lyricist) Based on: "The Bonnie Blue Flag" (Tune suggested or parodied) Middle-Earth Based on: "Penny Lane" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Bastard King of England Joe Ross (arranger) Raskind (arranger) Note: Attributed to Rudyard Kipling To Anacreon in Heaven Ralph Tomlinson (lyricist) John Stafford Smith (composer) Note: As sung at the Crown Anchor Tavern in the Strand, circa 1780 Rum, By Gum: The Temperance Union Song Dick Eney (lyricist) Paula Smith (lyricist) Jim Landau (lyricist) Note: Credited to listed authors "and unknown others." Originally an English Song satirizing the "South Asian Army." In America the focus changed to the Salvation Army or the Temperance Union. Hark! The Heralds Loudly Cry Steven MacEanruig (lyricist) Based on: "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing" (Tune suggested or parodied) Drunken Spaceman Based on: "What Shall We Do With the Drunken Sailor?" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Freshmen at Yale Based on: "I Was Born About Ten Thousand Years Ago" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Government Is Watching Joe Ross (lyricist) Based on: "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" (Tune suggested or parodied) Men of Harlech In Welsh God Bless Free Enterprise Based on: "God Bless America" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: Credited to Burton House (M.I.T.) Marcus Aurelius Society The Alcoholics' Anthem Based on: "Men of Harlech" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: From the Christchurch, New Zealand, University Revue Uncle Joe and Aunty Mabel Based on: "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing" (Tune suggested or parodied) Note: From the Christchurch, New Zealand, University Revue Woad Based on: "Men of Harlech" (Tune suggested or parodied) God Save the Queen Based on: "Corey, Henry" (Tune suggested or parodied) Lady Godiva: The Engineers' Song Based on: "Rambling Wreck from Georgia Tech" (Tune suggested or parodied) God Save King Pendragon Based on: "God Save the Queen" (Tune suggested or parodied) Whatever Became of Tom Lehrer? Robert Osband (lyricist) Based on: "Whatever Became of Hubert?" by Tom Lehrer (Tune suggested or parodied) Fuzzy David Stever (lyricist) Based on: "Cloudy" by Paul Simon (Tune suggested or parodied) My God, How the Money Rolls In Based on: "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean" (Tune suggested or parodied) The Twelve Days of Marxmas Based on: "Twelve Days of Christmas" (Tune suggested or parodied) Imperium Compound Based on: "Lilly the Pink" (Tune suggested or parodied) Joy to the World Steven MacEanruig (lyricist) Sir William the Lucky (lyricist) Based on: "Joy to the World" by Georg Frideric Handel (Tune suggested or parodied) Seven Old Ladies Based on: "Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?" (Tune suggested or parodied) National Embalming School Based on: "O Tannenbaum" (Tune suggested or parodied) Based on: "A-Hunting We Will Go" (Tune suggested or parodied) In the Corps The Spanish Inquisition Anthony R. Lewis (lyricist) Based on: "MacNamara's Band" (Tune suggested or parodied) When I Was a Lad Based on: "When I Was a Lad" by Arthur Sullivan (Tune suggested or parodied) Gaudeamus Igitur In Latin Captain Future Meets Gilbert and Sullivan: or, Alas, Who Loves a Spaceman? Stephen Schultheis (lyricist, author) Virginia Schultheis (lyricist, author) Based on: "H. M. S. Pinafore" by William Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan (Operetta parodied) Note: An operetta first performed at Westercon XX in 1967 The End Khasham (lyricist, author) Based on: "Auld Lang Syne" (Tune suggested or parodied)