Bernay's Cafe

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Zine
Title: Bernay's Cafe
Publisher:
Editor(s): Noel Silva (1986-1988), Susan Corbell (1987-1988), Mary Platt (1989-?)
Type: letterzine
Date(s): 1986-?
Frequency:
Medium: print
Size: digest-sized
Fandom: Miami Vice
External Links:
Click here for related articles on Fanlore.

Bernay's Cafe is a digest-sized letterzine.

It has at least thirteen issues. It was a member of the National Association of Fan Clubs.

This zine won two 1990 Fan Qs, one for best Miami Vice letterzine, and one for best Miami Vice editor.

"This letterzine will be a meeting place for those Miami Vice fans eager to carry on serious, intelligent, and friendly discussions pertaining to MV and its characters. Issues will contain forum questions regularly, news, episode and music guides, an ad section, art, a UK report, and whatever Ye Eds manage to scrounge up. The format will be attractive and professional-looking to reflect the stylized program that inspired it." [1]

Issue 1

Bernay's Cafe 1 was published in 1986.

Issue 2

Bernay's Cafe 2 was published in 1986.

Issue 3

Bernay's Cafe 3 was published in 1986.

Issue 4 (1986:May)

Issue no.4 cover
  • Editorial (1)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (1)

A fan writes:

"I do have some gripes about MV: Characters. There are seven of the most attractive, appealing and fascinating characters on television and after one and a half seasons, we know very little about any of them. How about a little interaction between them? Particularly between Sonny and Rico. They could be another Starsky and Hutch, but sometimes they act like they even they don't know enough about each other to become friends. They do their jobs and once in a while sort of hang out together, yet still they act like amiable strangers. What is Rico's background? His off-duty activities, where does he live? We know more about Zito and Switek than we do about him. I'm getting a little tired of tuning in and watching the Don Johnson Show. I realize the premise of the show is to feature Don and Phil (once in a while) and have all the others support them, but it would be nice if we saw all seven support each other -- if you know what I mean."
A fan writes:
"To address some of the questions in the editorial: I think Castillo's desk is so clean because that's the way he likes it - he is a very simple. stark, spare personality, and he also gets his work done, so there is not much to leave on his desk. Also, if he was the master DEA man we are led to believe, he's probably in the habit of not leaving much evidence around of his activities. I like it."
A fan writes:
"but I was very surprised to learn that DJ had such a large gay following at the start of his career (maybe he still does, for all I know) that he even posed for a LA gay magazine. It's refreshing to see a man so in tune with his sex appeal -- to BOTH sexes. I was also very impressed by what he had to say about love (this was from an interview he did sometime in the 70s): He was talking about straight and gay love, said it was all just love to him. And, while he prefers women, he also said that he believes that 'you can get just as good love from a guy as you cam from a woman.' What a nice, liberal, enlightened attitude -- especially with so many bigoted, homophobic idiots running around in the world!
A fan writes:
This is why Crockett is the real center of MV -- he's the Everyman, the doubter who wants to believe. He reflects the audience's doubts, fears and hopes; he's the human character. Tubbs, at this point, is too smooth, and we don't know enough about him (come on, writers -- we're still waiting!) to make him truly a central character. Crockett relies on his friendship with Tubbs because he can trust him, so Tubbs' function thus far has been to represent trust and loyalty."
  • Yesterday's gone, fiction by Ron Murillo. (34)

Issue 5 (1986:Jul)

Issue no.5 cover
  • Editorial (1)
"Hello. It's that time again for BERNAY"S CAFE. I'm happy to say that all of the sections we have come to love in Bernay's are back. Also many of you will be very happy to hear that you can now submit two full typed pages instead of one. Since I'm reducing all of the LOC's it takes up less space & will give you that extra page to write about what we love the most, VICE."

The type size for letters of comment was reduced and therefore the page count went down from 38 to 30 pages.

  • Ads (2)
  • Vice a toons. Reprints of strips from newspapers. (2)
  • Hammer's Jammers. List of music for some of the second season episodes. (4)
  • The Biscayne informant. Reprints of articles on Miami Vice and it's cast. (5)
  • Vicing out. Report on the 1986 MediaWest con with photos, see Con Report (8)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (10)
A fan writes:
"Out where the buses don't run was back in form. It was brilliant. Miami Vice at its best. Sony and Rico seemed so 'together'. It had an unexpected ending, one of their trademarks, and from the moment Sonny thought they were being watched, the whole episode had an eerie quality to it. Jan Hammer's music fitted every mood perfectly and the use of 'Brothers in Arms' by Dire Straits in the scene where Sonny and Rico go to confront Weldon was excellently done. Touching bit for me was when Weldon's ex-partner said to Sonny, 'He was my partner - you understand?' And Sonny said simply, 'Yes.' I think he did it perfectly. I feel, by the way, that Sonny and Rico's relationship HAS intensified - it's all subtle, but it's there for me."
A fan writes:
"At least MV managed to end the season on a better note than it started. But first, let me say that 'Trust Fund Pirates' was incredibly boring. For the first fifteen minutes I thought I had the wrong program on, that someone had very cruelly substituted an unsold pilot in MV's place. The pilot Hamilton?, seemed to think he was Han Solo out to convince Luke and Ben that the Falcon can fly at the point five past light speed. Speaking of pilots, the episode had spinoff written all over it, at least at first. By the time it was over, and I nearly turned it off before it was over(I kept hoping it would get better), the plot seemed a little scattered. Its only saving grace was the joking between Sonny and Rico and the look on Sonny's face when Rico told Fluffy to go ahead and shoot Crockett, followed by Rico's genuine - 'you're my best friend - I wouldn't do that to you' smile. Finally, I can believe they are friends. Their relationship has improved greatly over the last half of the season."
A fan writes:
"Well, what did everyone thing of 'Sons and lovers'? One of the best episodes all season, I thought, and they saved it for the very end! It was so nice to actually see PMT get a chance to act for a change, instead of just stand around and look ravishing (which he does, of course, better than anyone else). It was also great to see Sonny in the concerned, protective, supportive role, rather than the other way around -- they had some great exchanges between them in this one and a lot of little humorous, genuinely affectionate by-play . This is the sort of thing I like to see between TV 'partners' -- be they two men, two women, a man and a woman, etc. I STILL can't believe it all ended as it did though -- too unrelentingly sad and hopeless. IS it really over, though? I doubt it! That 'note' at the funeral let us know that much, at least. Maybe they'll take this up as a sort of 'continuation' for the season premiere? - what a premiere that would make! I may be foolish, but I have a feeling that 'Tubbs, Jr.' isn't really dead after all--he's with Calderone, and that's the next 'bomb' that he'll drop on Rico. Then again, maybe not--Rico would doubtless love to be a father and would probably make a good one, but I can't see how that would work out within the structure of the series, especially as the kid no longer has a mother. How would Rico manage him on his own with the kind of life he lives? (If I were writing this, I'd have Rico marry Trudy and then she would quit the force, unlikely as that seems--it would make for a lot of interesting conflicts,no?) But I guess that wouldn't work either -- I just read an item in TV Guide recently that mentioned that CASTILLO and Trudy may become an involved! Now, that's interesting! This would have have to be a fairly new development, since I don't recall seeing any kind of a 'spark' between them before. Unless I wasn't watching closely enough..."
A fan writes:
"Ah, not so with EVAN. This guy is INTERESTING. He has spunk! Spirit! The guy's got a story to tell and he tells it so well! Sure. he's a schnook. In fact, he's downright frightening as he takes a somewhat manic pleasure as he blasts apart a row of female mannequins during the show's beginning. By the half-hour station break, we see another side of Evan's nature as Crockett's relates to Tubbs Evan's background and the incident involving their one-time homosexual partner. Our loathing for Evan turns to pity/sympathy as he approaches Crockett and drunkenly pleads for forgiveness. By story's end, the situation has gone full circle as Evan sacrifices himself in order to save Crockett and Tubbs from a nasty weapons dealer. This is MIAMI VICE at its best. A compelling story, coupled with a great score by Jan Hammer and songs by Peter Gabriel adds up to a milestone episode from the first season."
  • Pulling the jacket. 1985-86 season episodes with synopses. (23)
  • Heated concrete, fiction by DJ Driscoll. (28)

Issue 6 (1986:Sep)

Issue no.6
  • Runnin' it down - guest editorial (1)
"I think the problem most people had with understanding DJ's contract dispute was that they didn't fully understand all that went on behind it. If, for, example, they'd read that TV GUIDE article a few weeks ago on stars' salaries they'd understand that what Don was asking for was NOT all that much, compared to such luminaries as Tom Selleck & Larry Hagman, or even to people like John Forsythe. Yes, to US $90,000 or $100,000 an episode, for 22 episodes a year sounds like a lot of money--but, like I've said before, in real-Hollywood terms it just ain't all that much. Look at the recent article in TV GUIDE about Suzanne Somers, who tried just about the same thing that Don did (but without his 'star power' to back her up) and lost out. These actors have NO JOB SECURITY their shows could be cancelled at any time and they'd be out of work. Granted Don Johnson would probably have little trouble rounding up more work at this point in time--and he's shrewd about building his career as he has been so far, he may not ever have any trouble finding work again. But who can say?"
  • Ads (3)
  • Pulling the jacket - Newspaper clippings. (3)
  • Vice a toons - reprints of newspaper cartoons. (5)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (6)
A fan writes:
"Firstly, The much heralded 'Tale of the goat': I loved the h/c scenes between Sonny and Rico, my favorite being the one in the hospital. Sonny held him so gently it was beautiful to see; also the scene where the helicopter was moving away from the disused swimming pool and Sonny gathered Rico up into his arms was gorgeous. The script was a bit 'iffy', though I feel upon reflection. Another bit I enjoyed was when Sonny said, Yes, sir, Captain Voodoo' to Castillo and he and Rico exited the office laughing."
A fan writes:
"I beg to differ with you editors: NO ONE in the entertainment industry is worth that kind of money! PMT wouldn't be worth it, either--nine years ago, neither was Paul Michael Glaser (no one could've been more besotted with him at the time than I was). DJ's recent behavior only shows the extreme disregard he has for not only the series and the people he works with, but also his fans. The fans, probably most of all. I'm just curious as to how those fans of his who come across like over-aged teeny-boppers whenever his name is so much as mentioned will react to these recent events. Either they will stay blindly loyal to a man who in no way deserves it, or a lot of pedestals erected in his name will topple. Luckily, I won't have that problem--he won't have far to fall. If you think I'm being harsh, well--I still love MV and I think it has a lot of potential for the coming season and I can't help but resent the fact that Mr. Star seems to be going out his way to hurt the show. How many of you can ever enjoy a show as much as you used to, once you find out that one of the stars really doesn't care for it anymore? I rest my case."
A fan writes:
"Another nice topic that came up was how MV used women (specially Gina and Trudy) in stereotypical men's roles. They mentioned the fact that you not only see them strutting their stuff on the sleazy streets, but you see them in fatigues and carrying rifles. It shows a good attitude towards them and their capabilities. Another thing that the show tries to show us, but I am not sure how effectively, is that only women who allow themselves to be used, will be used. Poor Sonny can't protect all of the poor babies can he ?"
A fan writes:
Now that I've seen all of the episodes this season, and the synopses in the back of the Cafe helped, I feel that like the second season is on the same level as the first. Some aspects I do find troublesome, Ricardo's mysterious home life, Sonny's at times irrational behavior mainly around women, the lack of developed background of the other players (but since we know so little about Ricardo why should the people billed below him be treated any differently?) and as mentioned before guest stars who fail to appeal emotionally to the audience. (Or should I say to me.) But every episode can't possibly inspire all viewers to excitement, everyone seems to have their own idea of the best & worst MV episodes. Different views and tastes in any fandom only serves to help that fandom. If everyone agreed with each other fan publications would be a total bore."
  • Control word, fiction by Sherry Magee. (16)
  • Hammer's Jammer, clippings on Don Johnson's album. (18)
  • The Biscayne informant, clippings on Miami Vice and it's cast. (20)

Issue 7 (1986:Nov)

Issue no.7
  • Runnin' in down - editorial. (1)
  • Major lust - ads. (2)
  • Hammer's jammers - list of music for 3rd season episodes. (3)
  • The Biscayne informant - newspaper clippings on Miami Vice and it's cast. (4)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (6)
A fan writes:
"As an episode,"When Irish eyes are crying' had a different theme; international hatred. VICE has posed the questions before about the line between undercover cop and quarry and the idea that the agent's personal identity becomes blurred with that of his cover until he may have trouble knowing who he is. This plot was more like a Sam Peckinpah film where the hunter, Cross, is really no different than the terrorist, Sean Carroon. Both will do anything to achieve their objective and you distinguish the good guys from the bad guys by who carry the badge. A complex subject terrorism."
A fan writes:
"Stone's war was another good episode. I like it when a character(s) come back for a return performance. During the gunfight at the end, I heard that Jackson Browne song that reminded me of MV even before this episode. That gunfight was spectacular. That may sound bloodthirsty, but I love to see that kind of sequence in slo-mo. Anyone remember 'The Long Riders'? That's the way to do it. And they did it again in the next episode, 'Killshot'. Little moments like that stick with you, like when Sonny and Rico are bursting into the Madam's place, Sonny is aiming his gun one way and behind him, Rico is aiming another. Then in slow-motion, they switch directions. The episode on the whole seemed to similar to so many others from last year, such as the ending, with the sound continuing on past the frozen shot of Sonny, who just ain't gonna make it in time. In the beginning, I that we were going to get to see Tubbs' place, since he asked Sonny if he wanted to crash at his place. And did anyone catch the arms on that chick in the black dress? I'm glad they didn't give her anything to say.'
A fan writes:
"I am very enthusiastic about the new season so far!. The look of Miami Vice is much more sophisticated now--darker colors and jewel tones lend it a more mysterious, less cotton-candy aura, while still getting across the tropical feel. Blues and greens are flattering to both Don and Philip. And the interiors are much more, well, designed--sets like the arms-dealer Kleiser's office and jai alai player Tico Arriola's apartment are restrained and elegant, unlike some sets last year where it looked like the Vice set designers went tackily mad. Was glad to see the interior of St. Vitus' dance in detail in 'Stone's war'-- they did a good job of showing a realistic Endeavor cabin (we owned an Endeavor 32 for a couple of years, Sonny's boat is a 42. There's not really as much room on the 42 as the camera would have you believe, but that's ok. Tremendously more room than there was on the 32.) Oh, and I was glad to see Elvis back again for a third year. After all the rumors this summer-- some say as crazy as the one that they were firing Jan Hammer--I was afraid Elvis might be a goner, too. He added a much-needed touch of eccentricity to Crockett's persona."
  • MV awards - apparently questionnaire was inserted in a previous issue on a variety of topics. There were Best episode (2nd season); Best episode (either season); Favorite celebrity guest star (2nd season); Favorite femme fatale (2nd season); Worst guest celebrity guest star (2nd season); best directed episode (2nd season); Best music-video sequence; All-time favorite music-video sequence; Worst episode (2nd season); Worst episode (either season); Favorite male guest character (2nd season); Favorite female guest character (2nd season); Favorite all-time male & female guest characters ; Most visually creative episode (2nd season); Most visually creative episode (either season); Favorite Zito hairstyle; Favorite Crockett outfit; Favorite Tubbs outfit; Favorite Castillo outfit; Best line (2nd season); Best line (either season); Funniest scene (either season); and most effective dramatic scene (2nd season). (16)
  • One piece of advice you would give Brandon Tartikoff, Michael Mann, Don Johnson, or Philip Michael Thomas. (20)
  • Not that this will make any difference, but should Trudy and Lt. Castillo have an affair? (21)
  • Your guess as to how Zito will be bumped off. (22)
  • Will you miss pastels? (22)

Issue 8 (1987:Jan or Feb)

Issue no.8
  • Runnin' in down - editorial. (1)
  • Major lust - ads. (2)
  • Vice-a-toons - reprints of newspaper cartoon strips featuring Miami Vice. (3)
  • Hammer's jammers - list of music from 3rd season episodes. (4)
  • The Biscayne informant- Newspaper clippings on Miami Vice and it's cast. (5)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. Letters. (6)
A fan writes:
"First thing I'd better do is wish all a belated Happy Christmas, because I'm too late for #7's deadline! Last time I wrote we were awaiting 'Yankee dollar' and much to our shock, that turned out to be our lot till next year! I enjoyed this episode, but was sorry to see another of Sonny's girls turn out to be not quite what he thought. Liked the song playing over the meeting at the airport scene and driving home, and didn't he look sweet with his little bunch of flowers at the airport? I do like Rico's little understanding nod, when Sonny loses his temper in frustration. It sort of says, 'Yes. O.K., you need this.' I'm looking forward to hearing all about the new season from you folks and as it's nearly the new year, we should be getting all the goodies from last season (yes, and the turkeys, too!) According to my spies, there's none this season yet! Mind You, I can usually find one saving grace, even in the duff ones."
A fan writes:
"I really enjoy the working relationship of all the characters. I have enjoyed this season's featuring of some of the 'lesser' vice squad people. But most of all, I enjoy Sonny. Now, there is a man after my own heart! This is a person I can identify with. I waited months for the episode 'Shadow in the dark.' At least, a real meaty role for Don that defined Sonny's character very well. Character traits only hinted at before came out. If Don Johnson doesn't get an Emmy nomination for this one, these people must be deaf, dumb, and blind! I was also amused by Rico's reaction to Sonny in this episode. Without much said at all, you could tell what he was thinking. I would dearly love to see their working and caring relationship further explored. There is a lot more that could be done in this area that the writers seem to be just skirting around. My favorite line so far this year: "you live with me, don't you?' That sure sent chills though me. I Think I would have nightmares, too, Sonny."
A fan writes:
"What surprised me about "El Viejo' was how much I liked this episode. Beyond the fun of watching Willie Nelson was the underlying theme of the plight of the elderly. Really liked where Swi and Zito find out he's been living on cat food. Any of you with aging parents have experienced the struggle to maintain your dignity as both physical health and economic base deteriorate. I found the aging ranger who pulls his skills and dignity together for one last gunfight to be a moving one. A friend pointed out that there was a certain irony in having the man who played Gregorio Cortez okay Crockett's attempt to rescue a Texas Ranger. (For those who never seen the film, The Texas Rangers used the pursuit of Gregorio Cortez to help prevent their agency from being disbanded.)"
A fan writes:
"As to this season, in my opinion every episode has been well-done with really fine scripts. Of course some stand above the rest. But, that is the same with a great restaurant. There are always those special dishes--but you can't have lobster stuffed with crab meat every time. We have had: Stone's war, A good collar, Shadows in the dark, Baby blues, Forgive us our debts, El Viejo, Walk alone. These episodes have been some of the best things I have seen on television. They all grasp at your feelings, and evoke strong emotional response. The other episodes were also well-done and miles above other shows on TV. I think VICE this season, has gone out of it's way to try different points of view, different areas of what the Vice division would deal with, and also in dealing with the emotional reactions of the officers in their experiences."
  • U.K. Connection - Transcript of Terry's Wogan's interview with Don Johnson, 11/5/86 on Wogan, BBC1. (19)
  • Vice'n out - reports on two parties held the first night of th new season of Miami Vice with photos. (21)
  • Vice'n off - reprints of two letters sent to Brandon Tartikoff. (25)

Issue 9 (1987:Feb or Mar)

Issue no.9
  • Runnin' it down - editorial. (1)
  • Major lust - ads. (2)
  • Hammer's jammers - list of songs from 3rd season episodes. (3)
  • Letters to the pink sheet - letters. (4)
A fan writes:
"I will never ever forget the final scene in Part 1 of 'Down for the count.' It was so damn moving! The music in particular lent a melancholy air to the scene and the words fit perfectly. (I am anxious to know the title and who sings it.) And Stan's taking Zito's body into his arms and the LOOK on his face, in his eyes--it all sent shivers up my spine. I have re-watched that scene over and over since it originally played and it still makes me cry. I was especially pleased to note two things here: Zito didn't go out with the usual MV blood and gore violence--in a way he died in a more dignified manner, if you can do that--and I liked the way they played it, where Stan didn't even check for pulse or heartbeat. He, and we, just KNEW that Zito was gone. WOW! Part 2 was sort of a let down for me--I kept waiting for Switek or Crockett to throw a really big fit, but it was all rather toned down--good, in a way, I guess. Particularly good scenes were the one between Switek and Castillo, where the Lieutenant is quietly trying to see how Stan's doing; the scene where Stan lashes out at Sonny and Sonny sits there receiving stares from his colleagues (sorta reminds of a similar scene in 'Nobody lives forever', hey?) and the scene between Gina and Trudy right after that. Little bits and pieces, but nothing to move as deeply as the aforementioned did."
A fan writes:
"Well, where do I begin? Okay...'Duty and honor'. It was great, extremely well-written with a great 'almost' plot twist with Trudy Finding out Trang wasn't really Trang. There, for a minute, I thought he was going to do Castillo in! Of Course, ANY airtime on Castillo would be absolutely great to me. But I must admit, I did like 'Bushido' better because it gave you more mystery about his past. However, the opening of 'Duty and honor' with no mustache and long-haired Castillo, was great! What a nice touch. At least now we know what he looked like then. I wonder how long it will take Eddie to grow that mustache back? He probably won't be in this week's episode now. Anyway, I loved the end. Left me with chills. To think these men were on opposite sides all along but fighting for the same purpose - peace, a better world. Absolutely some very fine writing!"
A fan writes:
"I thought 'Theresa' was a knockout of an episode, certainly a great DJ tour de force that allowed him to run the gamut from rapture to despair. It's nice to see the vulnerability through the cynicism in Crockett's character. Loved the scene where he showed Rico the ring he'd bought, the almost shy statement that, while the stone was small, the gem was almost flawless, and his confession that he hadn't been able to afford an engagement ring for Caroline. The scene where Theresa confessed her addiction and Sonny vowed to help her was incredible. Helen Bonham-Carter is a fine actress and it was a joy to see a woman who was more than just another pretty face, who was multi-faceted, a professional, as one of my friends said, 'at least she had a brain'. Sonny's luck with ladies doesn't seem to be getting any better, but at least the class of the lady has improved. This was a very touching way to not only give the audience a personal story about one of the characters, but to highlight a problem that isn't as heavily discussed in the media - the problem of people in the medical profession who are addicts. It's easier to think of drug use as confined to the poor in city ghettos. It also gave the romance between Sonny and Theresa a logical reason for not working out. No one was the villain; both, in fact, are victims of the addiction and pay the price for their involvement. And I hope no one will say that Rico wasn't supportive of his partner throughout this ordeal. He was right there all the way. This was an excellent, if depressing episode."
  • Titilating the taste buds - two subscribers visit the Vice set with photos. (19)
  • The Biscayne informant - reprints of newspaper clippings about Miami Vice and it's cast. (21)

Issue 10 (1987:May)

issue no.10
  • Runnin' it down - editorial (1)
  • Major lust - ads (2)
  • Hammer's jammers - list of songs from 3rd season episodes. (3)
  • The Biscayne informant - reprints of newspaper articles on Miami Vice and it's cast. (4)
  • Miami Vice : a look behind and beyond. (6)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (8)
A fan writes:
"You all know I enjoy Miami Vice, right? That I have watched it from its inception and stuck with it through good times and bad? Then maybe you won't shove me out of the MV Fan Corps for what I'm about to say--I hope that Noel will still print it in Bernay's. It is only my opinion, after all, what the l/z is for. No matter how it may differ from yours. People, Miami Vice is not perfect. That's the major theme of Roger Simon's recent article in TV Guide, and I cannot fault it, for it is true. This season, though better than last, still captures the true flavor shown in the first season only in one out of two or three episodes. Trudy and Gina have virtually disappeared, Castillo is more of a walk-on (save for a very few episodes) than a leading character and the partnership between Tubbs and Crockett has once again deteriorated into exchanges of lines in the conference rooms between chases. This show can be criticized on that level--let's be realistic here, okay? It deserves to be criticized as it does not provide us with nearly the entertainment value it is capable of. I'm not saying I agree with everything Mr. Simon said. I thought "Shadow in the dark was an excellent episode, movingly acted by all concerned and quite chilling. But he's right about the gloom--I miss the pastel colors --all the animation on the actors' parts seemed to go down a notch when they changed over. I also agree that the series has become a vehicle for Don Johnson to the exclusion of everyone else--I DO like Don Johnson, but I also like Edward James Olmos and the other cast members and it disappoints me to see them relegated to the background"
A fan writes:
"My absolute favorite has been 'By hooker by crook'. The pun in the title alone was enough to delight me! Of the two episodes Don has directed, I think this one was by far the stronger. It was a wonderful blend of comedy and drama. As A TREK fan I was delighted to see George Takei as the villain. What fun he must have had being such a 'smarmy' baddie! And I loved Angela Cartwright's cameo as the 'grieving princess'. (loved Sonny's line.) And I thought this was the best Izzy yet! He had such wonderful lines: 'Defecating the First Amendment', Immoralizing women', 'attitudinal composites', defoliating my freedom.' Izzy is Miami Vice's own Mrs. Malaprop, and Martin Ferrero is sensational! Hope you've all seen him in other roles where he speaks without an accent. But poor Sonny! His luck never changes. This year we have seen him search for stability in relationships with professional women: Theresa was a doctor, a lawyer is mentioned in 'The afternoon plane' and Christine appears to be a professional businesswomen. I felt so sorry for Sonny when he found out about her. Besides the pain, because he seemed to care about her, the embarrassment of having it known by all his colleagues must have been very hard to take. (Hope you all noticed that he assumed a man ran Caprice Escort Service.) And finally Castillo wonders out of his office with an announcement to arrest Christine and the circle of humiliation is complete. When Togaru exacted his 'price' from Christine, I loved the shot of Sonny as he turned his face into the shadows. The man has not had a great year, but DJ has and this episode was exciting, nicely paced, and directed with a lot of confidence."
A fan writes:
"If the third season failed anywhere for me, it was in the fact that they didn't really explore Sonny's relationships with the people around him, most notably his partner. That's alright, though, because they did some other terrific things."
  • Definitely Miami Viced - A report on a visit to Miami and the set of the show with photographs. (24)
  • Thanks to everyone who took part in the recent Bernay's/MV letter campaign to Roger Simon, TV Guide, and NBC, and the Vice producers. I think we really made an impression! TV Guide says the Simon article was one of their most controversial this year—it certainly spawned a lot of pro and con comments. (30)

Issue 11 (1987:Jul)

Issue no.11
  • Runnin' in down - editorial (1)
  • Major lust - ads (2)
  • The Biscayne informant - reprints of newspaper articles on Miami Vice and it's cast (3)
  • Viced at Media - Photographs of Vice fans at MediaWest '87. (6)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (8)
A fan writes:
"I wish all of you could have been at MediaWestCon. We had a great VICE party. Noel asked those of us who attended the con to comment on our favorite thing. Now that's a toughie, so I'm going to cheat and comment on several events. Think my absolute favorite was getting to meet and hang out with so many VICE fans. I had the chance to talk about the show, watch episodes, and a lot of Don Johnson. It was great to put faces with the names on those LOC's I've been reading. And I've found a Castillo fan or two, too. Now that was a real treat! Then there was the party with the inflatiable pink flamingos, Sonny and Rico Cabbage Patch dolls and a Castillo Bear, great cake, punch and MV on the Big Screen followed by the Heartbeat video. There lots of jokes, laughter,and healthy lust around the room.Wouldn't have missed for the world."
A fan writes:
"Everyone wants to be in Show Biz was an episode a lot of people might not have cared for, but it was another example of Vice's willingness to take a chance with a different perspective in revealing a little more of the inner lives of our principal characters. This episode stood out as being more 'wordy' than most Vice stories, but the dialogue, while often depressing, contained much passion and emotion. It also gave us proof that while our hero, Det. Crockett, is cynical and disillusioned, he still will go the extra step to try and save the person with potential and feels a keen loss when he feels them slip through his fingers. To me, this is one of Sonny's most endearing qualities--the fountainhead of hope and idealism that keeps springing up after so many disappointments. We were also shown that Sonny is definitely more cultured and erudite that he chooses to allow people to see. His recitation of Mikey's play in the park was quite moving, and served to show the spiritual link or empathy between the criminal and the detective, and why, I feel, Sonny believes that Mikey is worth trying to save."
A fan writes:
"Please let's have an episode featuring Trudy. I hardly ever see much of her and I think that is a waste. I would hate to see her leave the series in frustration. She is a classy lady and I think deserves the spotlight more. Also, I think the show could use more humor. There does not seem to be as much of this wonderful commodity as there has been in the previous seasons. The darkness of the lightening and the clothes and themes could be off-set with a little more humor. Thank God for Izzy. Don't get me wrong; I like the realism and I don't mind that the episodes don't end on an up note but I think more humor here and there would present a nice balance."
A fan writes:
"Well, what the heck. Third season was great,overall.I would have started with a flashy episode, but we viewers must judge what is actually given to us and not second-guess the Powers That Be. In a season that gave us episodes like Stone's War, Walk alone, Shadow in the dark, El Viejo, Down for the Count, Forgive us our debts, By hooker or crook and Viking bikers from hell how could any critics carp (are you listening, Roger Simon?). If there is art on television, and it always been my contention that there is, Miami Vice is the show which consistently brings it to us, week after week. When I can sit uncomplainingly in the summer and watch reruns of episodes I've seen before (and often more than once, because of the wonderful invention, the VCR), and see new things in story and in production things that delight and entertain, I know I'm watching a work of art. There were no klunker episodes this year--even the episodes which comparatively not as good (Killshot, Better living through chemistry) were pretty good, and certainly miles above the dreck offered us by 'pretty good' episodes on other action dramas."
  • Third season episode guide with music titles. (19)
  • The network - reprint of an interview with Brandon Tartikoff (24)

Issue 12 (1987:Sep)

Issue no.12 cover
  • Runnin' in down - editorial.(1)
  • Major lust - ads (2)
  • The Biscayne informant - reprints of newspaper articles on Miami Vice and it's cast (3)
  • MV awards - Best episode (3rd season); Best episode (Of all time); Favorite guest star (3rd season); best director (3rd season); Favorite music-video sequence; All-time favorite music-video sequence; Least favorite episode (3rd season); Most visually creative episode (3rd season); Favorite Crockett outfit; Favorite Tubbs outfit; Favorite Castillo outfit; Favorite Izzy outfit(3rd season); Favorite Trudy outfit (3rd season); Favorite Gina outfit (3rd season); Best line (3rd season); Funniest scene (3rd season); and Most effective dramatic scene (3rd season). One piece of advice you would give Brandon Tartikoff,Don Johnson, or Philip Michael Thomas. Do you miss pastels? What would you like Michael Mann to do to change or improve the show? (4)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (14)
A fan writes:
"The music, of course, is another plus for me. I really enjoyed the last scene of "By hooker or crook' with Sonny of his boat 'fishing' and Christine comes to say 'goodbye.' I just had to have 'Holding back the years' by Simply Red, IMMEDIATELY and have played it to death. 'By hooker' was also a true study of Sonny's vulnerability. Even though he is a cop, and a TOUGH one - he still has that element of trust - especially with his beautiful women! Speaking of beautiful women, I thought Melanie was very good - obviously at times, coached by Don. The interrogation scene where she gets up and walks over to the wall and speaks with her back to Sonny -- a delicate and effective 'Johnson' technique. She had that look in her eyes of really knowing Don - not necessarily Sonny - and the chemistry was excellent. The love scene .. what can I say.. a little choreographed but verrrry sexy!"
A fan writes:
"MV is looking REAL GOOD in the ratings this summer, which warms my heart, also, and Dallas is literally bottoming out! Of course, there is no publicity about the poor ratings Dallas is getting. I loved third season Miami Vice, and feel the only thing missing were more personal stories about the vice cops. Sonny had his share, which you won't find me complaining about because I could Never get enough of DJ even if he was in every scene of every show, but I do hope we get more insight into Castillo's life at the present time rather than anymore stories about his past. I loved Duty and Honor, but enough about his past. That goes for Rico, too. I am happy Switek is getting a bigger part on the show and hope Gina and Trudy are given more opportunity to show their potential. Saundra Santiago was excellent in Heroes of the Revolution, and hope she will be given more episodes to show her singing and acting talents."
A fan writes:
"Yes, I feel Sonny will cross the line in fourth season, it would make compelling watching and it could be done over several episodes. I don't think MV would make the mistake of waving a magic wand either and making all better in one episode. He's gone too far, there's got to be a huge crack now. Everyone could have a big part to play, too.Discussing the chances of him making it back and how they could help him. I love humor, too, but having Crockett all hunky dory fourth season, after all he suffered in third season seems weird to me - but knowing fans, they'll write the missing stories themselves!"
A fan writes:
"Since one letter CAN sometimes make a big difference we should be sure to state our approval of Miami Vice and point out those aspects we are most pleased with. Certainly, if you feel you would like to suggest some improvements, that is your right, but please make it constructive criticism couched in terms that are still complimentary to the show. To run it down will much more harm than good."
  • Vicing out in Miami - report on visit to Miami and the set of the show. (21)

Issue 13 (1987:Dec)

Issue no. 13 cover
  • Runnin' in down - editorial. (1)
  • Major lust - ads. (2)
  • Hammer's jammer - list of music for some 4th season episodes. (3)
  • The Biscayne informant - reprints of newspaper clippings of Miami Vice and it's cast. (4)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (8)
A fan writes:
"Now 'Death and the Lady' had a lot of things going for it: an interesting plot with lots of appropriate twists, a smashing performance by Paul Guilfoyle as the despicable Milton Ganz, even a good buddy scene between Rico and Sonny. There were a lot of important questions raised here about the nature of pornography, art and exploitation. There were shades of other episodes - 'Little Miss Dangerous' (Fiona burned small drawings; Ganz burned big ones. They looked like they'd been done by the same artist.) The music sometimes reminded me of "Shadow in the Dark'. And there were lovely little touches like Sonny and Rico giving Gina the kitten. Loved Castillo's reaction: 'What if THAT doing here?' (Can you say CAT, Martin? There. I Knew you could.) Noticed that he didn't react when Sonny picked it up off the floor of his office later. Guess the little thing hadn't jumped onto her desk to knock off a pencil. Though I'm glad we had a scene with Sonny and Rico, this one didn't work well for me. There wasn't the build-up the way there was in 'Evan.' Since Rico came by the boat and was obviously concerned for his friend, we can assume that there had been an earlier indication that his partner was brooding over something. Sonny does seem to be one for 'sins of omission', and I liked the story he told. I really didn't like the ending. Perhaps the writer felt that the audience would feel too frustrated in Ganz got off without any punishment, but I wish they'd thought of something else. If watching Sonny backhand this schmuck around, thereby jeopardizing his career, was supposed to make me, as audience, feel some sense of retribution, it didn't work. Even in 'Shadow in the Dark", where Sonny was as obsessed as we've ever seen him, he remembered he was a cop. His motivation didn't seem nearly as strong to me in this episode."
A fan writes:
"Did everyone get to see Don on the Johnny Carson show a few weeks ago? He was terrific, and a lot of fun. Carson asked him about some of the recent tabloid rumors, and he responded. My favorite was the ex-wife question--Don said no he wasn't going to remarry his ex-wife, he was going to marry Carson's ex-wife. Carson cried out 'Bless you!' and threw his arms around a surprised but good-natured Don."
A fan writes:
"Contempt of Court--our first episode provided us with the proof that yes--brightness was back and every frame of film was beautiful. I feel this episode was a showcase for the guest stars more so than the regular cast. It tantalized the loyal viewers, with the apparent changes, but said...'Wait--there's more to come.' Everybody looked different--and that's good because 'different' is evolving. The cast must have went to 'Beautiful' class this summer because each and everyone of them looked spectacular. The star of the first episode was the suspense-- we sat there waiting for the knife to fall--the bomb to drop, because, from the beginning, the episode had the aura of a disillusioned, disgusted, and ravaged Justice. I put my snack aside in repulsion at the nauseating tactics of the Mafiosa Boss and his sidekick lawyer, Mr. Sleezeball. What a revolting pair! Meg Foster, always good, provided a woman role-model who was strong, no-nonsense counterpoint to the 'Sleazoid Brothers.' Our heroes continued their efforts to uphold the law while battling the evil that same law sometimes protects. Crockett was helpless in his cell and Tubbs was helpless in the knowledge all the right forms and the race against time isn't always enough. The ending has a theme VICE has used before, as real life often does. We, the viewers, had again just witnessed another battle of good vs. evil. Stepping back, at the last moment from the abyss of righteous revenge, Michael Mann's name is superimposed over the character's frozen despair; we sense that once again, MIAMI VICE has upheld the honor and integrity of the individual, while leaving the criminal to be ground, at some future time, under the slowly turning, but ever vigilant wheels of fate"
A fan writes:
"Child's Play is certainly one of the top MV shows of all time, and one of the best dramas I've ever seen on television! The story blended together perfectly! It may be my favorite of the year, time will tell, even though upcoming storylines sound very interesting! When I watch this episode, I think of all the letters we have written to Brandon Tartikoff, Don Johnson, and everyone else connected to the show, and how we wanted more stories about the relationships of the characters on the show. After Child's Play, I have no doubts about that anymore. Also, more of Castillo please, -- we certainly got that in this episode. Sonny and Rico are real soul brothers. And what about Sonny's relationships with Caroline and Billy? Sonny matured about 10 years in this episode. The good news about going through a crisis such as the one he faced, is that it made him look at the relationship he had with his son, where before he had not been able to accept responsibility for being a divorced father. If the boy Sonny shot somehow managed to live through the ordeal, Sonny's relationship with him must have changed his life, as none before cared anything about him."
A fan writes:
"The last con I went to was Pretty Good Convention. held Labor Day Weekend at the Lansing Sheraton. Mary Platt and I shared a room with several other fans who were into Vice by the end of the Con, even if they weren't when it started! It was a new Con, with a membership of only about 200, so things were very mellow and everyone seemed to know everyone else. Mary brought her pictures from Florida, and the guys were duly admired many times. The first night started out strangely (what else is new?) The Den of Vice was room 402 - we decided it was stuffy and needed some air. Mary slid the window open, not noticing the Sheraton doesn't supply screens -- and watched one of her pictures of Sonny and Rico fell two floors down onto the entrance-way roof. Needless to say, the hotel maintenance man was not pleased to have to retrieve a Vice picture from the roof! On Sunday we got a impromptu Vice panel going in a blank programming slot, and had quite a good turn-out -- we pushed for writing the network in support of Vice, also got the word out for MV, BC, and Sanity Maintenance. Sunday night we manged to get a Vice block in the video room; 4 hours of Vice, and Don. Overall, the response we got was great -- there was enough interest in Heartbeat to hold a second showing the next day for those who missed the first one -- and there seemed to be a lot of 'closet Vice fans', so to speak, who got involved when we got things going."
  • Walking on water with Edward James Olmos - report on the Mill Valley Film Festival where this film made its debut. This film was later released as Stand and Deliver. (29)
  • a trip to remember for a life time - another report on the Mill Valley Film Festival. (35)

Issue 14 (1988:Feb)

Cover of issue no.14
  • Runnin' in down - editorial. (1)
  • Pulling the jacket - essay reflecting on the first four seasons of Miami Vice. (2)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (4)
A fan writes:
"God's Work touched upon the controversial subject of AIDS and it was interesting to note that although Jorge Cruz (Esai Morales) and his friend Francesco are revealed as homosexuals, neither that word nor any other associated with that community is ever used in the show. I thought Esai Morales portrayal was very fine and sensitive, a far cry from the Macho tormented Bob Valenzuela in La Bamba. Really like his confession to Martin. And I was impressed with the stand the episode took on the need for compassion and understanding towards AIDS victims. I loved the fact that Castillo was willing to blackmail the church to keep the hospice open. My kind of guy!"
A fan writes:
"This Friday is a new Vice, and the beginning of the end for Mrs. Crockett. Didn't resent Sheena as much as I thought I would. 'Like a Hurricane' was too good an episode--they handled the quick wedding well, and even managed to cover all the angles. Didn't forget to mention Caroline, got approval from Billy, shock and a little anger from Gina (the fire never died completely, just left smouldering) and the expected concern from friends over the speed of which things happened. Not that I doubt Sonny loves Caitlin (or thinks he does) but I feel it was a definite reaction to Caroline getting married again; he'd always keep hoping , somehow, they would get back together . As long as she remained single, the hope was there, and, then she remarried, and it was 'fine, you can do it, so can i.' Damn, Johnson's good, how about that speech about where his 'wealth' comes from--he really set her straight. And the proposal scene was well played. Poor Sonny --terror-stricken but determined. I guess the marriage is going to fall apart, though part of me wishes she would have departure of a permanent kind--wouldn't you just love to see Crockett on the vengeance trail! Sonny as bait in an escort service, checking out a murderer with a method too gruesome even for Vice--a definite nightmare for any wife!"
A fan writes:
"Love at first Sight was an episode that I really was looking forward to as Don was directing it. I can always expect some interesting camera work and some controversial scenes. Since I don't always pay attention to the credits on first viewing, I didn't remember who was directing it until the inter-cutting began and then i thought--oh, yeah, Don is doing this one! He certainly has a flair with the camera. I particularly liked the camera acting as the eyes of the murderer. My favorite was in the teaser when Sonny was handing in his tape at the desk and we see through the eyes of the killer who must have been walking by at that moment. The camera begins down the hall, spots Sonny, spins around quickly just like that meant. The episode was very suspenseful, from the aspect of the way the camera was used. It gave an added evil anticipation for the unveiling of the the murderer, even though revealing of who it was finally, was not as suspenseful as the anticipation. I enjoyed this episode very much, in fact I loved it, but I thought for a few reasons it felt a little short of being in the same league as 'Shadow in the Dark' and 'Forgive us our Debts. The predictability of the final outcome ruined it's chances as being in the fine tradition of those two formerly mentioned episodes. I'm not going to say I am brilliant enough to come up with what else they could have done, but if the writer had been a little less obvious, or had had much more unexpected outcome then the fine quality of the rest of the episode would have made it superb'"
  • Major lust - ads. (16)
  • Hammer's jammer -list of music for some 4th season episodes. (17)

Issue 15 (1988:Apr)

Cover of Issue no.15
  • Runnin' in down - editorial. (1)
  • Major lust - ads. (2)
  • Hammer's jammer - list for music for some 4th season episodes. (3)
  • The Biscayne informant - reprints of some newspaper clippings about Miami Vice and it's cast. (5)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (6)
A fan writes:
"Missing hours was hysterical (my friend Adriana can still break me up into launching into 'I feel good'.) Personally I think it was all a dream maybe Trudy ate too much peanut butter. (Though I still wonder about Rico scooping her up--think perhaps she has a bit unconscious yen for him? Sure she told him he had his chance, but...) Speaking of dreams, you all may have been over this a hundred times, but what's the consensus on 'Shadow in the Dark'? All dream? Part? How much was based on truth? The opinion around here is that it was all a dream, but one based on actual events. Rico and Castillo just seemed entirely too unsympathetic to Sonny's turmoil--which makes sense if Sonny was dreaming, still feeling very frightened of what had happened to him; his negative perceptions would tend to color the dream."
A fan writes:
"The Cows of October - slice of Vice absurdity! This one got mixed reviews from my friends, but thought it was hilarious. I'm an old western fan and half the fun was picking out the various famous themes. Izzy doing a Clint Eastwood imitation was a riot. Thought I's die laughing when he stood on the Albondigas (which means meatballs, by the way) bridge doing hand signals. Poor Izzy really is everyone's victim. He's trying to survive in a country where he's wanted by our police, the INS, his native Cuba for a variety of crimes. He is truly a stranger in a strange land. Thought they used him well in this one. And I got a real kick out of con man, Calvin, who took everyone for a ride. The show was silly and definitely outrageous, but I had a good time."
A fan writes:
"Hell hath no fury. I really found this to be an interesting story. And what s strong episode for Trudy. After a disappointing Missing Hours, I felt she really deserved this. It was easy to understand and sympathize with her desire to protect the rape victim, who was being used at every turn. Was she right to violate orders? It's a good question, and one that will probably be debated. But this show had a Vice first. For the first time since he took over the squad, all of Martin's people conspired to keep information from him. No wonder he was son angry at the end!"
  • Vice fans go to Miami and discover the real Miami Vice. (12)

Issue 16 (1988:Jul)

Cover of issue no.16
inside page from no.16
  • Runnin' it down - editorial (1)

"Also you will notice that Hammer's jammer isn't in this issue. Since I get this information from USA TODAY, they felt that the section which had that info be dropped."

  • Letters to the pink sheet. (2)
A fan writes:
"MIRROR IMAGE, which I wish they would have left as ALTER EGO, was really exciting. Boy -- That Burnett is one guy you don't want to meet in a dark alley -- literally. Burnett looked like the 'Terminator' coming out of that fog! It was an unusual treat to see Burnett without a memory, scruples, or a sense of humor. He really did a great job of covering his fears. The episode really did a top rate job of making us watch with our mouths hanging open in awe of this killing machine we knew as 'our Sonny'. I suppose this is why law enforcement is so wary of their people turning bad. Here is a guy who was the best, but who also knows the ins and outs of the criminal way, and when he turns (or so they think), boy -- have you got a problem. Even though we know Burnett is tortured inside, he plays it so cold and deadly -- this is probably from his police training. I loved it when Burnett killed the guy at the drug meet, made the other two get into the trunk, and when was asked about the dead body he says 'Who cares!' Vintage stuff! I suppose the only stupid line was Rico calling Castillo and saying, 'Lieutenant, I think there's something wrong with Sonny' -- no kidding!! Anyway, as we see our hero driving away and Rico screaming on the dock in his wake, MIAMI VICE once again did what only they can do -- and they left us to hang in anticipation for next season. I just love Burnett and hope they don't resolve the problem too quickly."
A fan writes:
" Deliver us from evil: Thank you for finally tying up a loose end -- how many of you would have been just as happy to see Crockett pull out his gun at the end of FORGIVE US OUR DEBTS? Of course, it would have been murder, Crockett would have gone to prison and Rico would have had a new partner. No one plays guilt and angst better than Johnson as Crockett, and the scenes after Caitlin's death were magnificent in their restraint of emotion you know is there. In just a look or gesture of Sonny's he tells us that he has not truly acknowledges her death, and their child's -- he won't let himself grieve, perhaps because he is afraid he will lose it completely, and perhaps because the pain he feels repressing it is just punishment for doing nothing to save her (not that he could have.) I wished for more emotion, more expressions of concern and caring from the others, but I believe that Crockett rejected all he got -- they hurt too much, and maybe he feels he doesn't deserve them. Someday, though, Sonny, it's gonna come out -- and it better or it will eat you away from the inside. I think Sonny's making everyone very uncomfortable, they don't know what to say (who does in that kind of situation?), and anything they try is rejected. Imagine how shocked they must have felt when Sonny showed up clean, well-dressed and shaved for work? He seemed to handle himself well enough, but it was just a cover, because he was definitely on the revenge trail. Oh, if he couldn't gotten Hackman by the book he would've, but no matter what it took he was going down -- no neat escapes this time. It was not a plant by Crockett (he just turns and walks away no time to stop and plant a gun in Hackman's hand) -- because it didn't matter -- he was going to kill him armed or not."
A fan writes:
"When Crockett confronts Hackman, Hackman still has a chance to live -- had he submitted and allowed himself to be arrested. Crockett probably would have spared his life. His 'duty' as a policeman would have forced him to. But Hackman, smirking right up to the end, taunted Crockett -- and Crockett has had enough of this kind of taunt from gloating criminals who flaunt the loopholes in the 'system'. Calderone taunted, and Mosca taunted, and the filmmaker Glanz taunted, and so have countless others .. and Hackman was simply the last straw. Hackman is also the one who has taken the most away from Crockett. In the minds of the audience, and in the mind of Crockett, Hackman has to die to pay for his sins. He is no longer even human -- he is one of the 'monsters' Crockett spoke of at the end of 'Viking Bikers from Hell' (which, despite its title, was a fairly serious exploration of the difference between humans and 'monsters.) Even up to the end, however, you can clearly see the struggle going on in Crockett's mind and heart, the deadly fight between duty and honor. Duty demands that Hackman live, but honor demands he die. And, in the end, honor wins."

Issue 17 (1988:Nov)

Issue no. 17 cover
  • Runnin' it down - editorial. (1)
  • MV awards - Best episode; Favorite guest star; Best director; Favorite music video sequence; All-time favorite music video sequence; Least favorite episode; Most visually creative episode; Favorite Crockett outfit; Favorite Tubbs outfit; Favorite Castillo outfit; Best line; Funniest scene; Most effective dramatic scene; Which look of Sonny's do you like best; Does Rico look better with or without his beard; One piece of advice you'd give either Brandon Tartikoff, Don Johnson, Philip Michael Thomas, or Edward James Olmos; If you could give Michael Mann your idead for Sonny Crockett getting back from over the edge, what would you tell him? (2)
  • Letters to the pink sheet. (10)
A fan writes:
"Several people brought up research (or lack thereof). If fans care enough to do research for fanfic, why can't the real writers? Is Vice turning into 'just another cop show?' Sonny went flat-line and the doctor zapped him with the defibrilator. Wrong! The defibrilator is used when the heart is goes into fibrilation, which means it's quivering like a bowl of jello. It hasn't stopped, it's out of rhythm and not pumping properly. The proper procedure course of action would have been to get Sonny's heart to do something. A shot of adrenaline or other stimulant could have thrown it into fibrilation, and then the paddles would have been of some use. as it was, the zap would have done zip. Unfortunately, this scenario has been used incorrectly in so many t.v. shows it's considered standard procedure. Too bad it doesn't work."
A fan writes:
"As ever, the sight of B.C. was most welcome on my doormat. Had much enjoyment, reading about the first few episodes in fourth season, and, of course, am delighted there's going to be a fifth season. We had cause to celebrate the 4th of July here too, as the BBC at long last bought VICE back for us. The episodes have been in no particular order, but what we've seen have been good ones. Up to now, we've had "Baby Blues'; 'Forgive us our Debts'; 'Killshot'; and 'The Good Collar'. Next Monday's episode is the wonderful 'Shadow in the Dark', which we wondered if we'd see, as we know they've banned some, but have no way of knowing which which, with them being out of order, except 'When Irish Eyes', of course. I was lucky enough to have clones of some of these, but had never seen 'Killshot' and really enjoyed it. I love the character names Vice comes up with and Tico Ariola is one of my favorites!. Pity poor Sonny was faced with his usual rotten choices at the end though, and he showed his usual loyalty and naivety about his friend Frank, I feel Castillo suspected all along. Did anyone else notice Trudy's jealousy of Mrs. Baptista's eyeing up and down of Castillo - not that he noticed, of course! Liked the way Sonny looked Castillo straight in the eye after Frank stormed out and said 'He should have been told.' That wasn't cheeky in my book, just mutual respect between the two. Sonny knows Castillo respects his opinion, even though he doesn't always agree with it."
  • Off to the offshore races - a report on Don Johnson's participation in the Bay City Offshore Boat Races in Michigan. (13)

1989 (Win/Spr)

Cover of 1989 winter issue
  • Jump city - editorial. (2)

"Welcome the first issue of the new Bernay's Cafe: a special welcome to all of our new members who have joined in response to the recent national publicity about Vice Viewers International in USA Today and other newspapers."

  • Dealers (classified ads). (5)
  • Dead Bang - excerpts from reviews. (6)
  • Runnin' it down - VVI news. (8)

"We experienced a slight delay in getting this issue out to you -- and you may notice a few changes! first of all, the readership of Bernay's Cafe has joined with the membership of Vice Viewers International, to form the largest group of Miami Vice fans yet organized! Former Bernay's Cafe's editor Noel Silva is working with me to get it all together. Noel will continue to publish the Miami Vice fiction compendium, Sanity Maintenance, and is continuing active participation in Vice fandom."

  • The VVI insider - news of Miami Vice and it's cast. (13)
  • We go to Miami Vice's 100th episode party by Mary Platt. (18)
  • A person of integrity: what Martin Castillo has meant to Miami Vice; an analysis by Sherry Magee. (27)
  • At the Sweethearts Dance premiere by Bonnie Skaggs. (31)
  • The Star Trek/Miami Vice connection or: Why are there so many Star Trek fans in Miami Vice fandom by Elaine Batterby. (34)
  • Viewer viewpoints - letters (38)
A fan writes:
"I was upset about Michael Mann's announcement that this is Vice's final season, so have been writing letters to him. I told him he didn't know how many millions of fans Vice has, that it is the best show on TV, was so true to life and had more thrills and excitement than any other TV program, was the kind of show you couldn't wait from week to week to see, how great the cast, crew and producers are, and that if he ends the show it will be like losing a whole family. It will be a big blow to TV, since there wouldn't be anything worth watching any more. I received a card from him--it said thank you for your letter and keep watching. We had all better get busy and flood him with letters."
A fan writes:
"The great news is, we're getting a new series of Miami Vice in March! We couldn't believe it! We've never had it that early since first season! I rang and left a message for Jonathan Powell, the BBC-1 coordinator, who does seem to take on board what we fans say--which makes for a lovely change."
A fan writes:
"The though of Vice and no Castillo doesn't work for me. He is strong but caring, the way I feel a cop should be. His beliefs are very strong--he is not a weak man. You certainly could not have an inexperienced actor in the character of Castillo. Mr. Olmos has added a certain depth to the show that was needed. I for one have taped every episode and DO plan on viewing them again. I think the new season has been great so far. No particular favorites yet. It really makes me mad about the ratings. My whole family has rearranged our Friday nights around Vice--we make sure we're home. I have written to Mr. Mann so many times I'm sure that he dreads seeing my name! I won't give up this show without a fight! Basically I think every Vice episode leave the viewer thinking, and you can put whatever you want into them. The episodes are surely NOT glorifying drugs or that way of life. The characters all get to show the pain they feel for what is going on out there. "
A fan writes:
"This fifth season is in keeping with the high standards of production we have come to expect from Miami Vice. Don Johnson, Philip Michael Thomas, and the rest of the cast are the best on television, and will have to be remembered at Emmy time this year.I cannot believe that the Academy would overlook Don Johnson's performance in the season premiere. That he can create these separate personalities in one episode is amazing!"
A fan writes:
"I hope the calls and letters will help, but I'm feeling that NBC is just writing the show off. I didn't indicate this in my letters, but I'm also disappointed with some of the writing this year. It seems somehow lacking in the intensity that was so gripping last season and at the beginning of this season. I did like 'Fruit of the Poison Tree', 'To Have and to Hold', and 'Miami Squeeze', but 'Jack of All Trades' left something to be desired. I still love Don's scenes, and his persona this season that I can only describe as a world-weariness, , but I'm getting so tired of his taking care of every waif that comes along (cousin or not)! I feel like they're doing the same story lines over and over, and leaving undone some scenes I'm really waiting for--i.e. more close relationships for Sonny and the other characters, too; and for Sonny to work through his loss of Caitlin and the baby, and the continuation of his therapy. I don't know--maybe I'm overreacting--but something seems to be missing and I think it's in the writing. It's like they've either run out of ideas, or perhaps out of enthusiasm or energy, or themes don't seem fully developed. They START to touch on an important issue, but then they don't carry it though, and I'm getting really nervous that the end of the series is coming. And I'm not ready to face the loss yet."
A fan writes:
"What the heck is going on with Tartikoff now? Why has he put Vice back in the 9PM slot? Is the show still good for the rest of the season? All of these conflicting reports on its future are getting confusing. I keep writing letters to the NBC head honchos, though, no matter what. Wouldn't it be nice if they sent us a memo telling us what they're up to? I though that maybe if UNSUB catches on they'd use it as a lead-in for VICE, but it worries me when they keep moving VICE like that. I hope they aren't thinking of dumping it. Wouldn't it be riskier starting with a whole new lineup Fridays than keeping the one solid show they have and keep working with it? Or is it too much to hope that NBC execs are capable of making sane logical decisions?"
A fan writes:
"Just watched 'Redemption in Blood'. Was it good! At the end of 'Hostile Takeover', when Tubbs and Burnett met up, I thought it was indeed curtains for Tubbs. I was sure glad that Burnett missed Tubbs intentionally. That whole episode had me glued to the TV--so much suspense! I liked it when Burnett wandered back into OCB like he was in a trance. When he finally got to the squad room, everybody drew their guns on him--that was eerie. Switek should have had thinner clothes on. He looked like a tent while he was taking Crockett to the elevator. It was clever of Crockett to escape from poor Switek (he still gets a rotten deal!). It'll be interesting to see, in the episodes to come, if Crockett gets cleared of Yagovich's death. My wife and I were very happy with the first two episodes. I'm going to get a letter off to NBC and call them in New York in the morning."
  • Close encounters of the mall kind - a fan relates of a chance meeting with Don Johnson and Melanie Griffith. (62)

1989 (Sum/Aut)

Cover of 1989 Summer issue
  • "Welcome back to another issue of Bernay's. Hope the little wait was worth it.Because of the large number of feature articles in this issue, and the threat of it becoming another monster 70 or 80 pager, we may notice we don't have quite as many reader's letters in this one. Fear not--we're saving a bunch for next issue, so if you don't see yours in here, it's a pretty safe bet it'll show up next time." (3)
  • Runnin' it down - news of Don Johnson and his activities. (4)
  • Good reads - Centrifuge by J.C. Pollock; The guide to high performance powerboating by Joanne Fishman. (8)
  • Special preview - Don Johnson' new album, Let it roll, by Mary Platt. (9)
  • Let it roll - our fan panel reviews Don Johnson's new album. (14)
  • Hot Spot. Don's new movie begins filming in Texas. (22)
  • Capitalizing on quaintness - reprint of news article on Taylor, Texas where Don Johnson's movie was being filmed. (24)
  • On the hot seat - Taylor transforms under the spotlight of film crew. Reprint of news article on filming of Don Johnson's latest movie. (26)
  • The last hurrah - a farewell to 'Vice' as we visit the set for the final two episodes by Mary Platt. With photographs. (28)
  • Bye, Pal! - reprint of articles by critics on the series finale of Miami Vice. (46)
  • VVI goes to the Make-a-Wish Foundation celebrity tournament by Andrea Soper. Don Johnson gave out awards to the golfers. (51)
  • Letters. (54)
A fan writes:
"Had a letter from the BBC yesterday thanking me for my praise of Miami Vice and, all being well, there'll be more in the autumn! That's good to know, as we usually have to wait till next year -- so I'm wondering if they're giving us the back end of fourth season (they left us at 'Indian Wars' this past time), then next year, giving us the beginning of fifth? Whatever, they'll be more than welcome."
A fan writes:
"One of the truest statements ever made on VICE was what General Borbon's daughter told Sonny in 'Freefall.' She said to Sonny that his problem was that he felt too much. And she was right. It was because of Sonny's caring that he had no choice but to quit the force; it was destroying him. 'Freefall' was a bittersweet show. Throughout it I felt like the characters,, and actors,, were saying goodbye. Rico asked Sonny, 'Do you want to live forever?' This same question could be asked of the actors, about whether they wanted or hoped VICE could continue. All things must come to an end."
A fan writes:
"I watched the finale with great enjoyment, and sadness, as I said goodbye to the most interesting and historically important television show in recent years. I was not disappointed--the two hour special was filled with excitement, suspense, interesting characters, humor, and emotion. As always, the acting was superb, as was the writing and the fine direction of Russ Mayberry. It was wonderful that they were accorded the special Sunday night slot; it was only fitting that they end the way they began. I shall miss them. Television is the lesser for their leaving.""
A fan writes:
"The one comment I expected to see in BC and didn't was about the difference in music when Jan Hammer was in charge and when Tim Truman took over this past year. I didn't think the music had the same intensity this year. Granted, there were some wonderful selections, but over all I felt the music suffered from the departure of Hammer. Is it just me? What are others' feelings about this aspect of the show?"
A fan writes:
"To read about the heartwarming response from Don Johnson and the rest of the cast members to their fans was especially a treat. So often you hear negative about stars, and to hear that Don is so warm to them, even when he's surrounded by media, etc., shows and proves that he's a wonderful man. I'm pleased as punch to hear about another movie in the future. Like most, I'm anxiously awaiting the ALBUM. The recent Cosmopolitan article on Don was another prime example of his true warm personality."
A fan writes:
"Hoo, boy, am I glad nobody bit the big one in the finale! The ending montage was a great pop quiz (name that epi!), though in truth I though two hours had been quite heavily padded with shootouts. While the closure of the series with the ending quote being the same as that from the pilot was artistically nice, I would rather have had a sloppier scene--like what actually happened at the airport? Come on, five years and all we get is a handshake? Am I alone, or did anyone else feel cheated? A raw prawn award to the writers for spending so much time on the boring exposition and none at all on the personal repercussions to the guys. Maybe it's unrealistic of me, but I had really expected a bit more emotionalism to be packed into this episode designed as the Great Farewell Story."

1990 (Spr)

1990 Issue


References

  1. from an ad in Pop Stand Express #4