Noir (anime)

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This article is about the anime fandom. See Noir for other uses of this term.

Fandom
Name: Noir (ノワール)
Abbreviation(s):
Creator: Koichi Mashimo (director), Ryoe Tsukimura (writer)
Date(s): April 6, 2001 – September 27, 2001
Medium: anime
Country of Origin: Japan
External Links: ADV's Noir site, JVC's Noir site/JP
Noir.png
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Assassin Mireille Bouquet is invited to take “a pilgrimage to the past” with Kirika Yumura, an amnesiac teenage girl with incredible and deadly talents. Together, they take the name “Noir” and act as killers for hire while at the same time, trying to piece together the fragments of their linked past.

They are at turns helped and opposed by the mysterious Altena, her young charge Chloe, and the organization of which they are a part, the Soldats.

The Fandom

The fandom is dominated by femslash stories--primarily Mireille/Kirika, with a good showing of Kirika/Chloe. Because of the strong bonds between these women, even the gen fic can be pretty intense--it can be difficult to differentiate a subtle slash story for one intended as pure gen.

The Mireille/Kirika Ship Manifesto puts Noir into historical context within the yuri fandom:

Noir's fandom is small, but is it one of the most yuri-friendly ones. Noir was first broadcasted in 2001, several years after Sailor Moon and Revolutionary Girl Utena, two other yuri-friendly animes. The yuri in Noir is not explicitly canon (although there is plenty of subtext, and for a while that was all yuri fans had to go on), but because of that subtext, it was a godsend to yuri fans at the time. Then came Maria-sama ga Miteru (2004, although the novels have been running since 1998) and Yami to Boushi to Hon no Tabibito (2003) for the overly obvious subtext-that-might-as-well-be-canon and the blatant yuri with a sad ending, respectively, and then Kannazuki no Miko (2004), Kashimashi (2006), Strawberry Panic (2006), and Simoun (2006) for canon yuri animes with actual happy endings.[1]

Resources

Notes

  1. Maidens With Black Hands, by Star of Heaven. (Accessed April 19, 2009).