Bones' Vision

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Star Trek Fanfiction
Title: Bones' Vision
Author(s): Eileen Roy
Date(s): 1975
Length:
Genre: gen
Fandom: Star Trek: The Original Series
External Links:
art from Kathi Maynard, for "Bones' Vision"

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Bones' Vision is a Star Trek: TOS Kraith story by Eileen Roy.

It was published in the print zine Interphase #1.

Summary

"A story in the Kraith Series. The influence of a black star is having dangerous ESP effects on the entire crew. Influenced is McCoy and with him) Kirk, Spock and Tanya, Spock's wife." [1]

From the Editor of Interphase

EDITOR'S NOTE: If you aren't familiar with the Kraith Series (available from Carol Lynn [address redacted] send an SASE for information), some of this story's references will be a mystery. As briefly as possible, SPOCK is now married to LT. TANYA MINOS — also called T'ANIYEH — a human telepath raised on Vulcan in the Vulcan cultural tradition, Tsaichrani. Spock's previous wife, T'RRVEL, a full Vulcan, died during a vital Vulcan rite, the Affirmation of the Continuity. Spock, a Kaytaytikh, one of the specially gifted Vulcans who can conduct that rite, has adopted CAPTAIN KIRK as his brother and established a Ward- Lieger pact (with Spock as Liege) with him because Kirk is a reflexively-barriered telepath, whose repeated mindmelds with Spock have weakened his natural barriers. Prefacing this story, the ENTERPRISE is investigating a black star, which is having dangerous ESP effects on the entire crew. Spock's own scientific curiosity and lack of foresight have left the ship unable to use Warp drive to escape the star's effects, and he and SCOTTY battle time to devise and install various protective mechanisms with which to dive through the star's corona — the only escape route. Unfortunately, the star's influence obliterates Kirk's already weakened mental barriers and he goes into esper shock (spontaneous, uncontrollable mindmelding), inadvertently dragging Tanya into a mindmeld with him which she cannot escape. Their minds, and their lives, are irretrievably linked. As this story opens, the dark star's influence is destroying a number of barriers, some of them not strictly telepathic. Suited up in pressure gear to counter act the corona's intense heat. Bones McCoy is one of the victims. . . .

Reactions and Reviews

The first story, 'Bone's Vision,' is set in the Kraith universe and tells an alternate story to the situation in Kraith #5; 'Spock's Decision,' McCoy, under the influence of the black star, develops precognition and sees many possible futures. In one of them Tanya bears a daughter, an appealing tot who makes me wish that this future had prevailed and not the one Kraith projects. It's a complex and provocative story, and I enjoyed it very much. But I don't know how much sense it would make to someone who wasn't familiar with the Kraith series. [2]
Also, in the ish is a Kraith story, 'Bone's Vision.' It is eminently readable, more particularly for a Kraith story. [3]
Enterprise is investigating a dark star which is having devastating esper effects on the crew. Kirk is in esper shock, uncontrollably mindmelding, and dragging Spock's second wife T'Aniyeh into a dangerous meld. McCoy, normally psi-null, develops a prescience and views a variety of futures, each of them with nasty consequences for those he loves because of decisions he will make. I found the framing story and its resolution by memory-erasure worked by Spock hard to follow, and the Spock-McCoy relationship is more truly adversarial than we usually see. However, the internal story of McCoy's relationship to Spock and T'Aniyeh's child -- whom he calls "Kitten" and who must not be allowed to exist -- is very fine. This story also postulates a second daughter for McCoy, a child who died as a toddler in a preventable accident which was the catalyst that sent him to Starfleet. [4]

References

  1. from The McCoy List
  2. from The Halkan Council #10 (September 1975)
  3. from The Halkan Council #10 (September 1975)
  4. from Karen Halliday's Zinedex