Anchored

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K/S Fanfiction
Title: Anchored
Author(s): Kathy Stanis
Date(s): 1993
Length:
Genre: slash
Fandom: Star Trek: The Original Series
External Links:

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Anchored is a Kirk/Spock story by Kathy Stanis.

It was published in the print zine Against All Odds.

Summary

"On their way back from shoreleave, Kirk and Spock make an emergency landing on an unknown planet to wait it out until the Enterprise can make their postponed rendezvous."

Excerpt

"He wondered how much more there was to Spock's comforting than simply the intent to support. Had Spock merely been studying up on human psychology in order to make himself a better first officer, or did that holding fulfill some need in him also? These years together, Kirk had had many glimpses through the façade; he knew the Vulcan was inventing a unique self as he went along and knew his own influence had not been minimal."

Reactions and Reviews

There was a great deal to like in this 21 page story. The language used is lyrical, poetic, full of marvelous word pictures, such as "The kiss poured fluid warmth into his muscles." and "a big, wide, wild, white, screaming orgasm."

I especially like the opening section as Kirk describes his yearning for a place of mental rest as lowering an anchor into unfathomable depths without ever reaching a safe bottom, This was perfectly done.

I'm not sure Spock would use the word "fuck" so readily. Would he really describe joining with his captain using that term? Though the scene itself on the beach was beautifully drawn, that broke the mood slightly for me. Not the word itself, just that Spock would use it( would bring it up when Kirk hadn't referred to their joining like that.

Absolutely perfect their feelings about the miniature world they have discovered and how loathe they are to disturb it. Beautiful reverence for life shown here.

Interesting new aliens and a wonderful scene as Spock is taken under the water's surface to communicate with them. Sometimes the sentences were a bit too long, and I had to reread parts so as not to lose the thread of the story, but worth every bit of effort.

This author always manages a slant on the K/S relationship, and I enjoy reading her work.[1]
Kirk feels the weight of command as he and Spock are in the Galilao, after shore leave on a pleasure planet. Bound for return to the Enterprise, they are forced to land on a planet until they can be rescued. When exploring a beach, they discover a tiny world at their feet, during this togetherness, they think of wanting to be with the other, how they are falling in love and what it means. When Kirk prepares their meal, from all the other - worldly delicacies it's delightful' Especially "nectar - pods from the black orchid on Ardana", it is so inventive. Kirk's eventually breaking loose emotionally and running from the shuttle was, in itself, very well done and quite interesting - especially how he defined and saw himself. But it was rather abrupt, almost jarring because there wasn't enough build up. The language is very complex for most of the entire story. It is beautiful to read and it is intellectually stimulating as it is literary. But it sacrifices emotion impact I found myself getting caught up in exciting images and words, but I almost couldn't feel Kirk or Spock there. I had a hard time hearing them talk or seeing their actions. But there's absolutely no denying this author's ability with language. It just needs to be made more solidly the characters. I think I heard the writer instead of Kirk or Spock. But then, in one of the best scenes, Kirk and Spock emerge from oceans waters after encountering newly discovered life forms, to fuck on the beach. This scene has a wonderful immediacy about it and it is absolutely perfect that they do this after coming right out the water. Beautifully done with some great dialogue. This is what I came to space for, Kirk whispered. To ... fuck with me on the beach?" "Spock was glad Kirk could not see his face clearly. His boldness embarrassed him." The strongest part was the Kirk and Spock connection and the learning of each other, so the subplots of water beings and the probe was slightly confusing. I loved the references throughout the story to the title: "Anchored". This tied the whole story together and was a wonderful image as Kirk and Spock are "anchored to a particular star". Altogether, another excellent story from a truly accomplished author.[2]
I love the title to this story, as it is a perfect description of the emotional "feel' of this tale from beginning to end. Nothing is rushed, there is no real crisis to face, there is only Kirk and Spock on an emotional and physical discovery of themselves and each other.

This story begins immediately following the events of "Naked Time". Kirk is emotionally drained from the ordeal and Spock is aching to help, but doesn't know how. New orders sending them on a diplomatic mission at first seem the last thing either of them needs, but it turns out not to be the case. Going on tours and attending concerts only serve to bring them closer together and both find themselves completely at peace with themselves and each other as they board their shuttle to return to the Enterprise. While on their way, they receive a message from Scott saying that there is trouble with both the ship and the planet it is currently orbiting. While the situation is not serious, the Enterprise won't be able to make the scheduled rendezvous for several days. With only a limited amount of fuel, Kirk and Spock face a potentially disastrous situation, but luckily Spock finds a class M planet nearby. For once there is no crash landing or injuries to worry about, only a soft landing on an uninhabited planet which Spock soon discovers, as in the tale "Gulliver's Travels," is a true Lilliput, the two of them giants surrounded by trees, birds, and everything else the size of insects. Their initial excitement soon turns to disheartenment as they realize with every step they take, they are destroying hundreds, perhaps thousands of life forms. They beat a hasty retreat to the shuttle and enjoy a sumptuous dinner prepared by Kirk, followed by dessert that includes each other. The following morning, instead of waking next to Kirk, Spock finds himself under the sea, in telepathic communication with a race that is as intelligent and peaceful as he. A rendezvous with Kirk in the same ocean allows the captain to greet the ocean-goers and after, elated by the experience, Kirk and Spock to come together in both body and mind. They soon find themselves on a Vulcan ship on the way back to the Enterprise, where even Spock realizes everyone on board probably knows he and Kirk are lovers, but finds he really doesn't care. As for Kirk, once back aboard his ship, he feels reborn once again and eagerly looks forward to the future "anchored to a bright particular star."

One of this author's best.[3]

References

  1. ^ from Come Together #5
  2. ^ from Come Together #1
  3. ^ from The K/S Press #87