Tomorrow Never Comes

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You may be looking for the Dark Shadows zine If Tomorrow Never Comes.

K/S Fanfiction
Title: Tomorrow Never Comes
Author(s): Rosemarie Heaton
Date(s): 1999
Length:
Genre: slash
Fandom: Star Trek: The Original Series
External Links:

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Tomorrow Never Comes is a Kirk/Spock story by Rosemarie Heaton.

It was published in the print zine First Time #50.

Summary

"After their run in with the giant “amoeba”, Kirk and Spock become lovers, though Spock is unable to give himself totally at this time."

Reactions and Reviews

A nicely introspective story told mostly in dialogue between Kirk and Spock. I like this technique of using very little narration and the author uses it well.

It begins right after the amoeba incident and Kirk asks Spock: “What was it like to feel the Intrepid die?” This question precipitates the release of hidden emotions in both of them—feelings about Vulcan bonding and their relationship. They have their first kiss and go to Spock’s quarters to make love. They are interrupted by McCoy in a very cute scene with Spock talking to him at the door while Kirk is hidden in the bedroom. I loved it when McCoy sees the pile of clothes on the floor and says: “If you’ve decided to take in laundry, you ought to be very careful not to mix the colours.” So funny! Later Spock reveals to Kirk that he’s not a virgin like Kirk had thought. A while later, Kirk questions Spock about the statement that he “could promise nothing beyond the end of this mission.” And: “Let us enjoy what we have.”

Even though this might seem bleak, I found it thought-provoking—what would their relationship be like? [1]
Tomorrow Never Comes is an intriguing story. It is lifted above the ordinary short, first time story by two elements: the undercurrent that infuses the relationship and the opening scene. The story starts with a conversation between Kirk and Spock immediately after the events of The Immunity Syndrome, during which Spock is almost killed by the giant amoeba while he’s in the shuttlecraft. Kirk asks Spock a series of probing questions, starting with “What was it like to feel the Intrepid die?” I want to know the answer to that one, too! I liked Spock’s reply concerned the Vulcans’ link to the ALL—“It is more a knowledge that we are one with the world around us.” If only humans felt that way, too, we might be more caring of our environment.

Then once the fellows get around to expressing desire for one another, they retire to Spock’s quarters where the predictable happens. But Spock tells Kirk even at their first kiss “I am unable to offer you anything beyond the duration of this mission.” Although he comes up with an explanation for that statement by the end of the story, it is an obvious circumlocution, and we never really find out what he means. But there is a hint of sadness, of inevitable pain that permeates the story, I think, that makes it something other than a predictable light-hearted sexual exercise.

I also note the author’s continuing distinctive characterizations. No soft and romantic Kirk and Spock here! It’s not really one I favor on a steady basis, but she writes them so well within that context, Rosemarie Heaton makes it work for me. [2]
This follow-up to one of my favorite episodes, “The Galileo 7”, explores some of what Kirk felt sending his friend into harm’s way. There is so much potential there, and this author has captured some of it in a different context.

Kirk has felt something, some kind of connection, while Spock was endangered, and their conversation probes what this may be. As they talk, it becomes clear that Kirk has learned something about himself and what he feels for Spock. There is more than self revelation, he also finds how a Vulcan mental link operates.

There is good exchange between them, and a First Time, of course, which Spock pretty much initiates. A nice glimpse is given into the beginning of their life together. [3]

References

  1. from The K/S Press #43
  2. from The K/S Press #44
  3. from The K/S Press #66