Alex Day

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Name: Alex Day
Also Known As: nerimon
Occupation: YouTube personality, musician, writer
Medium: YouTube
Works: Chameleon Circuit (band)
Official Website(s): YouTube
Fan Website(s):
On Fanlore: Related pages

Alex Day (also known as nerimon) is an internet vlogger, musician and writer, made famous on Youtube. He's also known for his work as part of the band Chameleon Circuit.

Fannish Activities

In 2008, Day began writing songs about Doctor Who, dubbing the genre "Time Lord Rock" or "Trock". The genre was heavily influenced by the then-popular genre of Wizard Rock, and soon found a fan in vlogger Charlie McDonnell, who produced an acoustic performance of the song "Blink" on Youtube. Day and McDonnell joined forces with Liam Dryden and Chris Beattie to form the band Chameleon Circuit, releasing two albums with the band. Following Day's personal troubles in 2014, the band announced a hiatus later that year.

Other Music Projects

In 2010, Day, along with McDonnell, Blann, and Tom Milsom, created Sons of Admirals. Sons of Admirals was less of a "band" and more of a collaborative singer-songwriter project crafted to get songs in the charts and advance the members' individual solo careers. In 2011, they disbanded after this "core goal [...] proved to run against too many of our beliefs and approaches to music and promotion".[1]

Relationship with Slash Fandom

Alex Day was notable for interacting with the YouTube slash fandom on numerous occasions, sometimes affably, and sometimes... less so. He was friendly with a few of the moderators of the YouTube slash lj comm, partially because they were YouTube Slash BNFs. But he also infiltrated their (private) comm on multiple occasions, posing as a user named "Kyle Salmon" and writing (purposefully badly written) fanfiction. He even made a video about this, linking to his "Kyle Salmon" work.[2][3] This gave rise to the fandom retaliation/in-joke ship Alex Day/Kyle Salmon.[4]

Some members of the comm thought it was all in good fun, as he was friends with some of the mods. But others felt he was purposefully mocking and condescending to them, as well as sending his fans after and bullying the comm members who were, at large, writing fic in a locked comm and not breaking the fourth wall.

The contentious relationship between the Youtube Slash comm and Day became known to members of the comm as ceilingalex.

Sexual Abuse Allegations

In 2014, allegations came about that Alex Day had emotionally manipulated and coerced both fans and other artists into having sex with him, a number of whom were under 18.[5]. One of the people who came forward about his abuse was glitter_hippie, a former Youtube Slash (comm) moderator, who had become friendly with Day, and eventually met him IRL, leading to events they chronicled here. Although initially denying the accusations, Day later admitted that his previous relationships were problematic:

[Alex Day]

The model of consent that I followed, not that I specifically thought about it at the time - was that only, 'no' meant, 'no'. That is not what consent is. [6]

Several months later, Alex Day published a video stating that all claims against him were false.[7] It also came out around the same time that Alex Day had been in contact with producer and presenter Johnathan King, a convicted pedophile.[8]

References

  1. "Sons of Admirals website". Archived from the original on 2011-07-16. 
  2. "the now deleted video". Archived from the original on 2014-10-10. 
  3. ""Kyle Salmon's" tumblr". Archived from the original on 2015-05-03. 
  4. "a surviving example of Alex Day/Kyle Salmon". Archived from the original on 2019-02-18. 
  5. alexday-shitstorm, a tumblr collating the Alex Day tumblr storm, page 1, Archived version , page 2, Archived version , and page 3, Archived version , archived 16th March 2019
  6. Vlogger admits 'manipulative relationships with women' by Amelia Butterly, published 20th March 2014, accessed 21st February 2019
  7. Alex Day. "Alex Day - The Past". 
  8. untitled by toast-gh0st, published 2014