Archive

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If you are looking for the Star Trek: TOS fiction zine, see Archives or the zine called Star Trek Archives Coloring Book.

Synonyms:
See also: Zine, Archivist, Multifandom Archive
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Contents

An online collection of fanworks, usually fanfic, providing a centralized place for people to post and look for stories. The term generally means a multi-author collection, most likely open to anyone to submit stories, occasionally moderated for content or quality. Most fanfic archives focus on a specific fandom, or a genre or pairing within that fandom, although some are open to all fandoms, such as the Archive Of Our Own or animemusicvideos.org.

They are generally intended to be at least semi-permanent, and archives often change hands rather than shut down when the archivist retires.

The term can be used as a verb as well, to describe putting a story into an archive ("archive a story") as opposed to "posting a story" to a mailing list, LJ, message board or Usenet).

Early archiving

The earliest archives were created by hand, with an archivist who collected submissions via email and uploaded them herself, coding them into html and adding appropriate links to the archive's navigation pages.

Although this can be a time- and labor-intensive process, some archives continue to work on this model.

A list of active X-Files archives from 1995 can be seen here. Most were ftp sites with a few web enabled sites.[1] Gossamer, also X-Files started up in 1995. And by 1994, the newsgroups alt.startrek.creative and alt.startrek.creative.erotica began offering FTP archives (erotica offered slash). The Highlander mailing list HLFIC-L also had an FTP archive by 1996. Other mailing list archives in 1996: - jadfe Forever Knight slash, dsx (Due South slash), hlx (Highlander slash), dief (Due South)), and fkfic-l (Forever Knight). The Due South fanfic archive moved twice in 1996 from the University of Maryland to a server in Australia and then on to the Hexwood Due South archive.

Modern archiving

Modern archives are more likely to use some form of automated archiving software, allowing authors to upload their own stories. These archives often feature convenient functionality that hand-coded archives do not have. Some of the most common automated archive software packages are the Automated Archive and eFiction. On archives that use the Automated Archive software, a reader can input a search for very specific types of stories. On the Smallville Slash Archive, for instance, a fan might feel like reading an R-rated, angsty futurefic First Time for the Clark/Lex pairing, and easily be able to find every story in the archive that fits all those criteria. The eFiction software also lets readers filter stories through various criteria, and has many other appealing features, such as the ability to upload stories in chapters.

Archiving in 2009

Archive posting is very popular. The biggest archive, fanfiction.net, has over a million registered users. Some fandoms set up lots of efiction archives and hang out on the attached forums, and some forums set up multifandom archives to house the works of their members.

Amongst what is now LiveJournal-based fandom (including fans who have moved to LJ clones or forks such as InsaneJournal or Dreamwidth), archives have steadily declined in popularity since the late 90s. Some LJ-based fans maintain personal archives on their own webpages and post anouncements of their stories to LJ, mailing lists, and other fan networks. Others use LJ as their primary archiving site, hosting their fic as LJ entries (rather than hosting them on an archive).

Posting fic to LJ has disadvantages, principally that LJ is not automatically searchable so stories must be manually indexed using newsletters, themed masterlists, and noticeboards; also, many stories are too long for a single LJ post and must be posted in parts or chapters. But authors keep control of their stories, so they can be easily edited or deleted, presented in an individual style, or locked to select audiences. And, critically, LJ's comments system makes it simple for readers to leave feedback, and for authors and readers to interact socially.

This scattering of fanac across multiple archives, social media sites, and message boards can make it hard for readers and writers to find each other. It's resulted in a lot of fannish infrastructure devoted to collecting and archiving links to fanworks, rather than the fanworks themselves. On LJ and similar sites, there are numerous noticeboard and newsletter communities, and, especially in HP, reccers like Painless J, who compile themed lists of works. Social bookmarking sites like delicious, Gennio, and Stumbleupon are widely used to collect everything from personal recs, to all fanworks in a fandom/ship/kink/genre.

Archive Of Our Own

The Archive Of Our Own is a project of the Organization for Transformative Works (as is the Fanlore wiki). It is a pan-fandom, multilingual fanfic archive, which features an innovative tagging system, the ability to bookmark stories, and enables challenge moderators to host and collect challenge stories in special collections.

Brainstorming for the Archive Of Our Own began in May 2007, and coding began early in 2008. Although still technically in "open beta," by September 2010, the archive contained over 100,000 works in over five thousand fandoms.

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References

  1. WebCite for the X-Files 1995 archives].
  2. WebCite for Fan Fiction Archives.
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