Sex Pistols

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Not to be confused with the manga published in English as Love Pistols.

Fandom
Name(s): The Sex Pistols
Abbreviation(s):
Scope/Focus: Music
Date(s): 1976-
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History

The Sex Pistols were (1976-1978) a British punk rock band put together by impresario Malcolm McLaren, who ran a bondage shop called Sex. John Lydon showed up one day with green hair, bad teeth and wearing a Pink Floyd T-shirt that he had modified with the words "I HATE".[1] Lydon's bad teeth led to McLaren naming him "Johnny Rotten."[2] The original lineup was Rotten on vocals, Steve Jones on guitar, Glen Matlock on bass and Paul Cook on drums. Matlock was fired for allegedly liking The Beatles and being too good a musician for what McLaren wanted to accomplish. He was replaced by Sid Vicious, who had all of the attitude and none of the talent. Their first single, "Anarchy in the U.K.," was banned by The BBC. The same thing happened to their second single, "God Save The Queen," which included the lines, "God Save The Queen/She ain't no human being!" and proclaimed that England had "no future." They broke up after a disastrous American tour. Rotten would end the Sex Pistols' final concert, at the Winterland in San Francisco, CA, by asking the crowd, "Ever get the feeling you've been cheated? Good night," dropping the mic and walking off stage.

Canon

They only released one proper album, 1977's Never Mind The Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols.

Fandom

Fan Works

Fan Art

Pairings

The top ship on AO3 is Johnny Rotten and Sid Vicious, who were friends before Sid joined the band.


Other Links

Sex Pistols Official.com
Sex-Pistols.net

References

  1. David Gilmour had no problem with Lydon's actions, saying that Pink Floyd were "a target of substance" and that Lydon could never have gotten as much mileage out of an "I Hate Yes" shirt. (Schaffner, Nicholas. A Saucerful Of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey, Delta Trade Paperbacks, 1991, p. 210.)
  2. "The 100 Best Albums of the Last 20 Years." Rolling Stone, August 20, 1987.