Eric Kripke

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Name: Eric Kripke
Also Known As:
Occupation: writer/producer/director
Medium: television
Works: Tarzan, Boogeyman, Supernatural, Revolution
Official Website(s): On IMDb.com
Fan Website(s):
On Fanlore: Related pages

Eric Kripke is known mainly for creating Supernatural series which garnered him a lot of attention and fan appreciation. After he left the show, he created Revolution. More recently he developed The Boys for TV.

He is referred to as Lord Kripke by some in the fandom of Supernatural. Fans also use the motto "In Kripke We Trust" to show their support and faith in his decisions. The term Kripked refers to the experience of having your fanon validated by canon. It derives from an earlier term, Jossed, which referred to the opposite experience.

Opinions on Fanfiction

Eric Kripke is very aware of fanfiction. He was the Supernatural showrunner at the time the episode Monster at the End of this Book aired. This meta-episode highlighted fan activities, including slash fanfiction, as the characters discovered their lives were the subject of a fictional book series and fans were writing slash about them. Kripke has always maintained that this was a playful acknowledgement of fans and has always been positive in his comments about fanfiction.

I’m aware of fanfiction, and slash fiction between the boys (referring to Wincest). I think people read into the fact that there are two good looking guys on the road, and you can’t avoid going there. I take it as a compliment as far as the fanfiction between the characters, because what we set out in the beginning to obtain is a really self contained universe in which fans can come and go, and the rules and progressions are consistent. So just as in all other good universes, you can find new ways to expand and explore other corners of that universe is a good sign, and the fact that the fans are actually doing that is a good sign. I love it and I welcome it. I wanted to create a universe where we welcome others to come and play, and it means we’re developing a fresh universe successfully.[1]

References

  1. Eric Kripke, interview in Fandom at the Crossroads: Celebration, Shame and Fan/Producer Relationships, by Lynn Zubernis and Katherine Larsen, p. 214. (via kansaskissedlips)