Chi-sen-yai

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Zine
Title: Chi-sen-yai
Publisher: J.K.S. Enterprises
Editor:
Author(s): Sue Chamberlain
Cover Artist(s): Joan Griffiths
Illustrator(s):
Date(s): 1986
Medium: print
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: Star Trek: TOS
Language: English
External Links:
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Chi-sen-yai is a slash Star Trek: TOS 76-page novel by Sue Chamberlain.

front cover
inside page

This novel may have been part of a series; a fan in a 1994 issue of Star Trek Action Group runs an ad that said she wanted "any zines in the Chi Sen Yai series, especially Rah Sen Yai."

Reactions and Reviews

It must be said that I haven't read very many zines, probably about twenty in total, but of those, 'Chi-Sen-Yai' is my favourite. It is a Classic story zine that does not stick to the accepted ST guidelines or known background to the characters but, if you can accept this, then it makes for a good read (I've read it twice now). The story revolves around a young Kirk and his first meeting with Spock, and concentrates on their growing friendship and respect for each other despite a somewhat violent beginning. The setting is Vulcan, and there are a couple of interesting Vulcan characters around the edge of the story. Interwoven with the main theme is another story centering around Sarek and Spock, and a case for revenge. The story provides humour, action, hurt, friendship and mystery all in one go and I, for one, liked this. [1]
CHI-SEN-YAI issued by J.K.S. Enterprises is, so the advert tells me, one of three segments and RAH-SEN-YAI, a sequel zine, is planned to follow. However, the story does stand quite well on its own two feet and is an A/U story depicting the K/S relationship from the first meeting. The plot opens with Kirk's death. Before 'Death-plot Haters' panic, it is not James T. but his father who is killed and his death made to look like suicide. However, Kirk has left a tape, unbeknown to the possessor, with his son, James Kirk, explaining his involvement in a drug ring and one which could be used as evidence against the criminals. Therefore, the gang is somewhat determined to kill Kirk and destroy the tape. If this were not enough, Kirk's shuttle crashes, he is raped by a Vulcan in pon farr [no queries as to which Vulcan I am referring], promptly loses his memory, regains it and is sheltered by Spock's family when further attempts are made on his life. When Jim finally hears the tape, he is determined to clear his father's name and find his brother, Sam, who is involved with the drugs. Needless to say, this is finally achieved after much intricate dealing and many complicated manoeuvres, which involve the kidnap, firstly of Sarek, and then of Spock. Despite a poor beginning and initial reluctance, Spock and Kirk grow close. The zine ends with the two promising each other friendship and acceptance. For a K/S publication, this first story has no explicit sexual scenes whatsoever and concentrates heavily on action and characterization. I found the plot a little difficult to follow at times as the narrative flung back and forth between different scenes, in different places and occasionally felt the need for a less chaotic pace. Although I did not dislike CHI-SEN-YAI, neither can I decide whether I liked it. Subsequent readings are obviously called for. [2]
This is an alternative-universe K/S story. It starts with Captain Spock attempting to rape Ensign Kirk due to an early pon farr. Hardly the best start to a relationship. Kirk is rescued and is taken to Vulcan, to recover. The rest of the story concerns a series of kidnappings on Vulcan and attempts on the lives of Spock's family. The representation of Vulcan society is interesting and is probably the best part of the story. The zine is meant to be the first of a series and there is a sub-plot about the murder of Kirk's father which is unresolved at the end. The Kirk/Spock relationship does not develop very much during the story and I'm not sure if the alternative-universe aspect of the story does not take too many liberties with the characters. I would have to read the next story to deliver a final verdict. All in all I would say it is an interesting story which has potential for development. [3]

References

  1. from Star Trek Action Group #116
  2. from Not Tonight, Spock! #15
  3. a review by Gary in The Unique Touch #2