Fusion

From Fanlore
Jump to: navigation, search
Trope · Genre
Synonyms: amalgam
Related: crossover, AU
See Also: multiverse
Tropes · Slash Tropes · Tropes by Fandom
Click here for related articles on Fanlore.

Contents

A fusion is a type of fanwork which merges two or more fandoms by incorporating characters from one fandom into the setting of another as if they had always been there.

The term was common in some media fandom communities to distinguish these AU crossovers since at least around the year 2000[1], and further popularized by Liviapenn in 2005, when she created the sga_fusion community[2] to support the Atlantis Amalgamated challenge. Since the challenge was centered in the Stargate Atlantis fandom, many of the stories identified as 'fusions' come from that fandom, though the earlier concept of 'Amalgam' stories came from comics:
It's a little easier to talk about this type of thing in comics fandom, where there's a clear-cut difference between a crossover and an amalgam-- every so often DC and Marvel will get together and do an "Amalgam" comic, where two universes are squished together resulting in something like Sparrow, who is a squished-together version of Robin and Jubilee.) Anyway, that's what these stories should be-- not crossovers where Angel or Jim Ellison or Horatio Hornblower or Remus and Sirius suddenly discover the existence of Atlantis, but one where they've been there this whole time, as Marines, or scientists, or Athosians, or whatever. Where they've become part of a team, just as they are in their original fandoms. [3]
Some fandoms are very often used for fusions and are defined more by their fusion potential than by fannish activity in-universe alone; His Dark Materials is a good example, with whole livejournal comms being devoted to the genre.

The idea of writing fusions, especially with popular movies, is attractive to quite a few fanwriters, though it is not always successfully implemented.[4]

Popular Fusion Types

Fusions often borrow a setting or an element of canon, and ignore everything else from these fandoms; canon knowledge (sometimes even on part of the writer) is rarely necessary.

Borrowed Settings

  • There are many stories in which characters are students at Hogwarts (often prompted by an idea about which House a particular character might attend.)
  • Jedi and Sith in the Star Wars universe
  • Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern universe

Borrowed Canon Elements

Same Actor Fusion

A Same Actor Fusion is like a Same Actor Crossover, but rather than having two characters in different canons who are played by the same actor meet, they are combined into one. These stories usually include a fusion of other canon elements such as setting as well as characters.

Footage of different characters played by the same actor is sometimes used in fanvids, gifs and other fanart to create the illusion of continuity between characters.

    • This fusion began being drawn and written when it was announced the Benedict Cumberbatch had been cast along side his Sherlock co-star Martin Freeman as the dragon Smaug in The Hobbit. The portmanteau names "Smauglock" and "Johnbo" refer to the Smaug/Sherlock fusion and John/Bilbo fusion characters respectively.
    • Rupert Graves characters Detective Inspector Lestrade and Paul Prentice have been fused by sadynax and others.[5] Paul Prentice is perhaps the inspiration for the Inspector's fanon leather jacket, motorcycle and appreciation for punk music.

Fusion Fanart

Examples

Same Actor Fusions:

Sometimes major characters in their original universe become minor characters in the new fused universe:

Fusions offer many possibilities for humor:

References

  1. RatCreature. How to construct Alternate Universes that work as fanfic. Originally posted to FCA-L on 28 January 2001. (accessed 6 November 2008)
  2. Atlantis Amalgamated: the fusion universe Accessed November 6, 2008
  3. NEW CHALLENGE: ATLANTIS AMALGAMATED" Accessed November 6, 2008
  4. "The thing is, AUs aren't copy/pastes of movie transcripts. Can an author lift dialogue? Sure. Lift scenes and circumstances? Absolutely. Does an author have to explain the characters and how they feel in that situation? Yes. [...] And that's the the thing about AUs: they're work. You have to know what you're saying about the characters and there has to be something deeper there. screamlet and leupagus and I have spent hours talking about it over the course of writing Legends and Spoctoria and even Dr. Princess -- these characters don’t exist in vacuums, and even when you put them in space operas, they're still them with defined character traits and baggage. You have to respect that and then tell the story from there. [...] An AU is not an excuse to write OOC. Otherwise you're just parroting back the film (and I can watch that)." from ON THE SUBJECT OF MOVIE AUs/FUSIONS (No, Really, Apparently This Needs To Be Said), essay by waldorph, 11 January 2011. (Accessed 11 April 2011)
  5. ääärrr by Sadynax
  6. Brighid. Night Watch. Posted 4 September 2000. (Accessed 7 November 2008)
  7. Dolimir. Scheduled for Termination. Posted 29 August 2007. (Accessed 7 November 2008)
  8. Inclination, by Jacquez. Posted 27 May 2001. (Accessed 7 November 2008)
  9. kellifer_fic. A Heartbeat At My Feet. Posted 22 January 2008, accessed 07 November 2008
  10. T'Mar. There Is No Gene. Posted 23 October 1998. (Accessed 7 November 2008)
  11. "X", posted 16 August 2006, accessed 06 November 2008
  12. inukagome15, The Lonely God, accessed 06 April 2014
  13. skoosiepants. Stay Left, posted 17 December 2006, accessed 06 November 2008
  14. Poptarts in Atlantis, accessed 06 November 2008
  15. Astolat. The Dark Side, posted 27 July 2006, accessed 06 November 2008
  16. Siriaeve. Truth, Justice, and Rodney McKay, posted 21 January 2007, accessed 06 November 2008
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Fanlore
Browse Categories
Help
Shortcuts for Editors
Toolbox