The Doctor and the Enterprise

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Zine
Title: The Doctor and the Enterprise
Publisher: Jean Airey and Pyrodonian Renegades (1st edition)
Pioneer Books (2nd edition)
Editor:
Author(s): Jean Airey
Cover Artist(s): Gail Bennett (1st edition)
Illustrator(s):
Date(s): 1981 (R&R XIII)
1982 (1st edition)
1989 (2nd edition, unauthorized)
1991 (online version of 1st edition)
Medium: print zine, fanfic
Size:
Genre: crossover
Fandom: Star Trek: TOS/Doctor Who
Language: English
External Links: The Doctor and the Enterprise (original 1982 version)
Click here for related articles on Fanlore.

Contents

The Doctor and the Enterprise is a gen Dr Who and Star Trek: TOS crossover 64-page novel by Jean Airey. The cover is by Gail Bennet.

From an ad in Universal Translator #24: "What happens at the end of Kirk's first command of the Enterprise? Why did Spock retreat, McCoy become a hermit and Kirk take a desk job (and change his hair)? Why is Spock worrying about bus drivers, and what will the mysterious stranger do when he finds out that Kirk has lost his yo-yo? This original novella was a 1983 Fan Q winner."

Its Publication History

It is possibly the most reprinted (sometimes without permission, and often quite altered) fan fic. The story was originally printed in the 1981 ST zine "R&R XIII." It was then published as a stand-alone zine by Jean Airey with a cover by Gail Bennett in 1982.[1]

In April 1984, the first part of the story was printed in Enterprise #1.

cover by Gail Bennet (1982)
another version of the cover, the Zeta Minor edition

A second edition was then released in 1989 by the American publisher Pioneer Books (which specialized in unofficial reference books based upon various franchises including Doctor Who and Star Trek) as a trade paperback edition.[1] It was illustrated by Tom Holtkamp and Mahlon Fawcett and it was edited to remove all references to copyrighted characters and races. Captain Kirk became simply "The Captain", while Spock became "The Scientist". The editing was not perfect and in some cases the characters names can still be found in the second edition.[1] Some fans claim that Paramount threatened to sue the fanzine at which point it was the editor, Jean Airey, who released the second version with "all proper names from the story" removed.

The author sets the record straight:
"Prologue: In 1979 I started writing a *fanzine* story in which the Doctor (from the "Doctor Who" universe) met up with the crew of the "original" "Star Trek" series. It was the first thing I'd written since graduating from college fifteen years before, and, with the assistance of an excellent author and very good friend, Jacqueline Lichtenberg, was able to finish it. The result turned out to be an enjoyable reading experience to a number of people. The story was not intended to be a satire, it was intended to be an honest representation of what might happen if these two particular universes met. It was intended as a fanzine in the most classic tradition of that particular genre. Unfortunately that popularity resulted in the ultimate "ripping off" of the story without my permission into a highly priced "book" format (in one version) and to a complete travesty of the original in yet another."[2]
To counteract these unauthorized versions the author released the zine in online format in 1991.[2]The author also wrote a sequel to the novella "The Lieutenant and the Doctor" which was published in the adult zine The Blue Guardian #13 (1982). For a review of the story see On “The Lieutenant and the Doctor” by Allyn Gibson (31 January 2006).

Serialized in "Enterprise"

ENTERPRISE #1 (April 1984) 2nd edition contains 52 pages. Part one of a serialization of THE DOCTOR AND THE ENTERPRISE by Jean Airey (illustrations by Tom Holtkamp). "Star Trek In Comics" featuring interview with Len Wein, Marv Wolfman, Martin Paskow and Mike Barr. Star Fleet Assembly Manual (building a miniature of the Avenger class starship). See Enterprise for more.

the zine Enterprise


2nd Edition

alternate cover issue #1
cover of second edition, Tom Holtkamp (1989)
"... there are two covers in particular that make me wince when I see them. First, back to Hal Schuster, and a rare work of fiction from one of his companies. To avoid being sued, he made a lot of changes to the story (which did not please the author) and added "funny" art to make it look like a parody, which is protected speech, though it was never meant as a parody by the author. But the caricature of Tom Baker, looking suspiciously like a camel, misses funny and enters some world of evil." [3]

The cover of this second edition is by Tom Holtkamp and it was published by Movie Publisher Services. The second edition contains 129 pages. It is the only edition that contains Wizard of Oz references which were not part of the original story.

Second Edition Blurb:
Three universes in imaginative collision – with delightfully funny results. An underground classic, this tongue-in-cheek parody is an affectionate tribute by a fan of both Star Trek and Doctor Who who is also a professional writer. This cult favorite has already won thousands of fans in small editions. It is newly illustrated for the current edition. Take a Moebius trip into adventure as The Doctor and the crew of the Enterprise encounter the Wicked Witches and the Tin Woodmen in search of the Ruby Slippers with which to power their starship. Chuckle as the Doctor and the Wizard of Oz join minds with those unforgettable words, "Hello, anybody home...."[4]

Gallery

In September 2010, Jim Van Hise sold on ebay the thirteen original art pieces done in 1989 by Mahlon Fawcett. He described them as "... based on the fan fiction novel THE DOCTOR AND THE ENTERPRISE. Artwork is 8 1/2" x 11... [These were] done for a new printing of this Doctor Who meets Star Trek novel published by Pioneer Books." Samples of this art are in the gallery below.

Zine Review

Review from one collector of the zine:
"I don't know when I first heard of Jean Airey's tale. It may have been an issue of Starlog, sometime in the mid-80s. I knew about it, but it wasn't until the mid-90s that, thanks to the Internet, I was able to read it.
In a way, I wished I hadn't.
I'd imagined for a long time how the meeting between the two universes would have gone, how Kirk would react to the Doctor and vice versa. "Having is not so great a thing as wanting," is how the saying goes, I think.
The Doctor and the Enterprise isn't a great story. It's just a collection of random events that happen to the Enterprise crew, and the Doctor happens to be along for the ride. Sontaran fleet? Visit to Lightunder? Daleks? It's all vaguely pointless. The characters don't feel quite right.
(Oh, and Lightunder. I always "heard" it as "Lie-tun-dur," while I recently discovered that the planet's name was meant as a Darkover homage. My misreading led me to not realize that for a decade.)
Through eBay I acquired two fanzine copies of the story a few years ago. One was, it turned out, the original Zeta Minor publication. Another was done by NBM Books, a collection of the serialization from Enterprise Incidents. This may be one of the most republished fanfic stories ever, and as often as not without the author's permission.
I've heard that Airey wrote a sequel, "The Lieutenant and the Doctor." I imagine it's about how Dorcy Stephens, the alien anthropology specialist aboard the Enterprise, stows away on the TARDIS and becomes the Doctor's new companion, probably in the gap between "The Deadly Assassin" and "The Face of Evil" (which is where I place The Doctor and the Enterprise). Not having read the story, I have no idea, though.[5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Doctor Who Wiki. The Doctor and the Enterprise (Accessed 20 June 2011).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Stories by Jean Airey, (Accessed 20 June 2011)
  3. [http://web.archive.org/web/20100806014502/http://starfleetlibrary.blogspot.com/2005/05/judging-books-by-their-covers.html Starfleet Library
  4. memory-alpha.org. Fan publications#The Secret Logs of Mistress Janeway, content no longer available at the Memory Alpha wiki. (Accessed 20 June 2011)
  5. Comment by Ally Gibson, see comments: Judging books by their covers..., 06 May 2005. (Accessed 20 June 2011)
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