From a Certain Point of View

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Zine
Title: From a Certain Point of View
Publisher: Shoestring Press/Whine Press
Editor(s): Carolyn Cooper
Date(s): 1985-1994
Series?:
Medium: print
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: Star Wars
Language: English
External Links:
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Contents

From a Certain Point of View was a Star Wars zine, with an emphasis on Luke Skywalker stories. There were ten issues.

Issue 1

cover of issue #1, the Luke cover
cover of issue #1, the Han cover

From a Certain Point of View 1 (80 pages) It was published in 1985.

Fans could request either Luke or Han on the front cover; the one they didn't pick went on the back cover.

Stories:

  • Nothing Ever Happens (Running away from home solved six year old Luke Skywalker’s boredom—with a vengeance) (7 pages)
  • Cartoonist’s Gallery (6 pages)
  • Wedding Bells (Leia’s getting married—but to whom, or what?) (11 pages) by Susan Sizemore. (From a reviewer in Southern Enclave: "The main character has to be one of my favorite fan-created personalities-- Leia's Aunt Aliin, a terribly officious and wry woman who decides that Leia must get married to a rather cumbrous, unattractive prince from a race that refers to women as "things". Much to Leia's rage. Aunt Aliin decides this is the best way to save her rebel niece's life from the Emperor's clutches. Having absolutely no pretensions about itself, this story was thoroughly enjoyable for its freshness and sense of humor.")
  • Artist’s Gallery (9 pages) by Dani Lane
  • Echo (Somehow Leia always knew Luke was her brother, but how and what past shadows came forth that night) (3 pages)
  • Between A Father and A Son (What passes between a father and a son when one is found and lost again) (1 page)
  • One Small Thing (Han Solo was just minding his own business, enjoying some free time when a starving pickpocket made his day) (12 pages) by Carolyn Cooper.
  • Just A Little Something I Picked Up (Luke Skywalker gets a little surprise. What do you do with a Jedi’s daughter—especially when she prefers Han) (20 pages) by Carolyn Cooper.
  • Not Everyone (Does everyone have the Force? Han thinks not and with good reason) (2 pages) by Marcia Brin (Offers a great little argument between the Big Three about that nagging question, "Does everyone have the Force?" Han adamantly says no, but watch for that clever ending.)
  • Ben's Lament, a poem by Linda Vandriver, illustrated by Dani Lane (Ben regrets his failure with Anakin.)

Reactions and Reviews: Issue 1

Stressing the upbeat and humorous, FACPOV offers an easy evening of light reading and some rather striking interior colors and cover art. The best of the long fiction is Susan Sizemore's "Wedding Bell Blues" and Carolyn Cooper's two connecting pieces, "One Small Thing," and "Just a Little Something I Picked Up." Sizemore's story is told in a deliciously sardonic tone. The main character has to be one of my favorite fan-created personalities--Leia's Aunt Aliin, a terribly officious and wry woman who decides that Leia must get married to a rather cumbrous, unattractive prince from a race that refers to women as "things". Much to Leia's rage, Aunt Aiiin decides this is the best way to save her rebel niece's life from the Emperor's clutches. Having absolutely no pretensions about itself, this story was thoroughly enjoyable for its freshness and sense of humor.

Cooper's two pieces introduce us to a child character [whose special relevance to the Big Three I Shall not divulge). Cooper grabs you immediately with a strong introduction and a fine ability to establish a setting. The idea is certainly not original, being a highly overused source of cutesy fan fiction: a lost, starving waif whose special lineage is suddenly discovered and complicates the lives of our main characters. Nothing here surprises. Nevertheless, it is an engaging alternative. (Han fans take note: he is the most prominent.) A complaint, however: I would hope that at the very least fan fiction set after ROTJ would take into account that film's "humanizing" of Leia. Leia in Cooper's stories is utterly bereft of any warmth or humanity- only Han has that. The old one-dimensional cliche about a single minded devotion to a cause is piled on ad infinitum. Would the same young woman who sensitively befriended Wicket not show any compassion whatsoever at the sight of a ragged, starving, frightened orphan? (And why would Leia be upset at the idea of Han having been previously married?) My own personal prejudices are operating here, admittedly, but it seems to me that many fans make fantastic leaps in speculation about Leia that have no basis on screen. In the wake of ROTJ, especially, Cooper's characterization seems particularly primitive. Yet another Marcia Brin vignette appears here called "Not Everyone," which closes out the the zine; This one offers a great little argument between Big Three about that nagging question, "Does everyone have the Force?" Han adamantly says no watch for that clever ending.

Dani Lane's powerful spree of images which company Lynda Vandiver's evocative poem "Ben's Lament" (about his failure with Anakin) is probably the most striking in the zine. Lane's work seems at once complex yet simple. Lane's intro illo to "Wedding Bell Blues" is not only lovely in its detail and breadth, but also captures the story's wry humor. It is Lane's ability to capture the mood and feel of the works she illustrates that strikes me the most. Also remarkable in its scope and detail is her intro piece to the "Artist's Gallery" section -an impressive effort of portraits of all the major characters, and a few extras thrown in. The color covers of Han and Luke are a visual delight, although a bit stiff in their rendering Carolyn tells me that half the copies have Han on the front, while the other half have Luke. you specify which one you want--that is, if you care. There are a few problems--typos. too little space between text and between columns (I think it is better to have no line between columns; not every space should be filled) and a little faded repro. Borders are overly thick and the columns are much too wide. FACPOV's interior colors are certainly pretty, but they are also far too random. It gives the zine a "messier" look. But it may be a worthy experiment on Carolyn's part. I hope she uses it in a more structured way next time. I do have mixed feelings on the merit of interior colors. On the one hand. I do enjoy looking at them. They provide an added spice to the content. But on the other hand, they can be a distraction, and a bit glaring. First issues are usually hard to recommend, but I can't un-recommend this one either. Up to you. [1]

Issue 2

From a Certain Point of View 2 was published in 1986 and contains 187 pages.

front cover of issue #2
back cover of issue #2
some variation of the front cover? Title page?

From an ad in Southern Enclave: " How did Han lose his cookies? The real scoop behind the royal wedding? Is the honeymoon over? Will Beru make the worst dressed list?"

Issue 3

From a Certain Point of View 3 was published in 1987 and contains 146 pages (five stories).

front cover of issue #3
back cover of issue #3

From an ad in Southern Enclave: "What monumental battle are the Rebels losing the day after the Death Star? What's General Solo's son up to with a heavy blaster and a bottle of Upland Reserves? Han and Chewie with a steady, legal job? What Naughty Bits of trouble is Hanna Beru in now?"

Issue 4

cover of issue #4

From a Certain Point of View 4 was published in 1989 and has 138 pages. From an ad in Southern Enclave: "The secrets of the Rebel stars exposed! Will a certain former smuggler complete his mission or end up in the slammer? Was the Bespin incident really a happy ending? Were those Kessel runs as peaceful as Han remembers? Plus, the exciting 76-page conclusion to Hanna Beru on Ord Mantell."

  • Contact In Issquay (34 pages)
  • Always In Motion Is The Future (12 pages)
  • An Average Day On A Kessel Spice Run (12 pages)
  • A Fine Time Was Had By All (65 pages)


Issue 5

cover of issue #5 -- "A lot of folks take one look at the Johanna Lindsey spoof on the cover o f F ACPOV #5 and say they don't want an "adult" zine. I have to convince them it's a satire of the romance novel covers (for those reading who haven't seen it, Melea Fisher did a fabulous spoof of the romance cover that was banned from a number of groceries stores throughout the country. Naturally, this doubled sales. On FACPOV#5, you see a side shot of a naked Han crushing Leia, in a flowing, offthe shoulder ante-bellum style gown, against his chest. A strategically_placed bush covers a third of his tush. And Bespin floats in the background.) It was certainly an unexpected reaction. But I've had to make very clear that FACPOV is a PG-PGI3 zine in many areas." -- comments by the editor, Carolyn Cooper, in Southern Enclave #39

From a Certain Point of View 5 was published in 1990 and is 198 pages long. It is the "Romance Edition."

From an ad in Southern Enclave: "He drew women like a magnet and Hanna Beru could not resist him. What dark forces plotted against them? Can Leia survive the eesires of two men? What tragic secret is Han Solo hiding? Luke Skywalker must find the lost Jedi secrets, and his only link is a mysterious and desirable woman. It is the usual roundup of suspects, quality writing and fun!"

  • And They Call It Puppy Love (21 pages)
  • Empire and Foundation (5 pages)
  • And For The Republic (61 pages)
  • Past Shadows, Future Voices (108 pages)


Issue 6

From a Certain Point of View 6 was published in 1994. It is the "Family Values Issue." From an ad in Southern Enclave: "I'm looking for some good stories and art with our heroes and their childhoods, children, family relationships (maybe Han and Leia's wedding?), etc. As always, FACPOV prefers upbeat, positive pieces with our heroes as a prominent part, but I'll look at well-written dark drama."

References

  1. from Southern Enclave #11
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