Crack

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Trope · Genre
Synonyms: crack! (as in crack!fic, crack!vid)
Related: Crossover, Alternate Universe, badfic
See Also: Humor
Tropes · Slash Tropes · Tropes by Fandom
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Contents

Examples Wanted: Editors are encouraged to add more examples or a wider variety of examples.

"Crack" has two main meanings in a fandom context, both playing off the slang for crack cocaine:

One, [1], that a fanwork is highly addictive. The rec community Crack Van plays with this definition. "Crack" was a common slogan in older anime fandom and emblazoned on t-shirts and bumper stickers. [2]. One example was "Anime: Crack is Cheaper," referring to both the addictiveness of anime, and the expense of obtaining it on VHS.[3]

Two, crack can describe fanworks with a fundamentally ludicrous premise, or otherwise including a plethora of unbelievable, incredible, or just plain silly elements - that is, implying the author/artist must have been on drugs to produce something so insane. It may be used in a compound noun ("crackfic"), or as an adjective ("crack pairing").

These two meanings may be meant simultaneously, e.g. "DC Comics is delicious crack."

Crackfic

"Crackfic" is a term for a story which takes a ridiculous premise as its starting point, such as casting all the canon characters as My Little Ponies. It may or may not deal with this premise in a serious way.

Negative or Neutral Term?

Discussion has arisen within fandom about whether the label "crackfic" can be pejorative. Some claim that initially it was always meant derogatory: "Initally, Crack!fic was short for "oh, god. That's aweful. the writer must be on crack to have beagles be in their story or have blair shot/stabbed/raped/require a liver transplant/etc or think that wings were a good idea." It was derogatory, and there was nothing positive in it. The story was self-indugent codswollop, with no basis in reality or canon, and there was do doubt about that." [4]

Some argue that such a label gives the writer permission to take the topic and/or writing less seriously, thus producing substandard fiction: "The downside is it's also an excuse to be lazy in the name of fun. So I think crackfic in the hands of careless or inexperienced writer could be a painful, ugly thing." [5]

Others believe that crack simply refers to the inherent silliness of the topic, and those who write crack can do so with just as much skill as any "serious" writer: "Crackfic is, IMO, a matter of premise. Crackfic implies an initial premise that is implausible, if not impossible, a premise that's surrealist, even absurdist. Someone turns into a girl. Or a badger. Or a penguin. Or they sprout wings. Or lay eggs. Or get pregnant, despite being a man. They get set down in a historical context outside the limits of accepted behavior, without being called on it - a man is "cast" as a schoolmarm, complete with skirts and petticoats." [6]

Other fans dislike the term as it pre-labels a fic for them: "... that's why it bothers me, sometimes, when an author labels a story crackfic--she's doing the thinking for me, telling me how to judge the story, where to rank it. But I want to do that, myself. And it is, I'm sure, about the writer's feelings about her story and her own process while writing it, but it still bugs me some to be told that I shouldn't be taking this story seriously. What if I do? Does that mean my judgement is off?" [7]

For a very early 2006 discussion of crackfic, see What is this human thing called crackfic?.

Defining It

Depending on the fandom, certain tropes or plot twists may or may not be considered "crack." A fandom like DC Comics - which features clones, shapeshifters, angels, mermaids, space aliens and an island of magical lesbian separatists all happily coexisting in one canon - has a higher standard for crack than a fandom like Due South. In turn, Due South's quirky, offbeat tone and occasional moments of magical realism lends itself better to stories with fanciful premises than a source with an emphasis on strict realism, like Law & Order or The Wire. Several DC Comics fans made this point by taking the wtf_27 challenge, and finding examples for every "crackfic" prompt (such as bodyswap or wingfic) in mainstream canon.[8]

Some fandoms are known for crack above and beyond that in canon; e.g. Stargate: Atlantis has a reputation for producing crackfic.

Crackvids

[what defines one, is the label used in vidding?]

Examples of Crack in Fanworks

(need more!)

Crackfic Tropes

These tropes may be considered crack, depending on the canon and the fan:

Fanfic

Fanvids

Fanart

livejournal communities

Further Reading/Meta

External Links

References

  1. possibly the original use?
  2. Such goods are not sold so much anymore, but see this wallet (accessed 2/12/2009)
  3. TV Tropes: Crack is Cheaper (accessed 2/12/2009)
  4. wickedwords. Comment on Cereta's post Crackfic. What is that, exactly? Posted 5 October 2005. (accessed 12 February 2009)
  5. snoopygirl at What is this human thing called crackfic?, 2006
  6. marythefan at What is this human thing called crackfic?, 2006
  7. Carolyn Claire at [[What is this human thing called crackfic?
  8. Chevauchee, Untitled Livejournal Entry, 08 May, 2006, (Accessed 18 October, 2008)
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