Casa Cabrillo

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Zine
Title: Casa Cabrillo
Publisher:
Editor(s): Theresa Wright
Date(s): 1980
Series?:
Medium: print
Size:
Genre:
Fandom: Starsky and Hutch
Language: English
External Links:
cover by an unknown artist; this cover won an Encore Award
"In the beginning..."
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Contents

Casa Cabrillo is a gen Starsky and Hutch 247-page anthology.

It has art by Nan Lewis, Beth Browne, Connie Faddis, Paulie Gilmore, David Hosky, Signe Landon, Jan Lindner, Tim Richardson, Julian B. Thompson, Linda Walter, Liz Wright, Dale Wright.

From the Editorial

As for the possibility of 'Casa Cabrillo II' -- I cringe at the thought. Zine publishing is, without a doubt, one of the most frustrating, painful, exasperating things I've ever done (and that was just THIS WEEK!!) It is also one of the most rewarding. Even so, I have no plans to do another S&H zine in the near future. If, and when, I recover from CASA I, I may decide to trek down the masochistic route again, but that's quite a ways off in the future, so please hold the SASE's.

Contents

Gallery

Reactions and Reviews

While two writer’ and one artist’s work do offer exceptional inside and a touch of class… the other entries range between unremarkable and frankly poor. Less ballyhoo, and vastly less pretentious packaging, should been in order. Problem areas first: The editor’s own ‘A Time to Grow’ takes as its theme the initiation of Kiko Ramos into responsible manhood… We are never told why a youth of Kiko’s background would wan to join a clearly criminal gang, still less how he could be brought to betray a friend in the process This particular lack is at least partly a function of the author’s obvious unfamiliarly with Chicano socialization patterns – she is, alas, equally innocent of Spanish grammar – but the preoccupation with causing S&H the maximum amount of payne and aguuny contributes, too. If Starsky’s original injury is gratuitous, his relapse and return to surgery for unspecified complications is flatly inexcusable. Add to this a stereotypical coward-bully villain, an uncontrolled tendency toward overwriting, and a much-too-easy emotional resolution and you have (A) a tale that requires a stylite’s patience and flair for self-mortification of its readers and (B) an extremely cogent argument in support of the wisdom of writing what you know. A pity, this. Properly handled, the idea could have yielded a first-rate story. Much the same judgment must ultimately apply to ‘Broken Faith.’ In this novella, Starsky goes undercover as a disciple in a religious commune, with Hutch as the ‘outside’ man. Their murder investigation proceeds without surprise or measurable suspense; the plot hums along steadily,… When S&H decide to quite the LAPD at the end, one is given to wonder whether it’s not a matter of sheer ennui at be forced to cuckoo every hour on the hour. On the positive side, they like the story’s other people, have received rather more attention than the plot. Mark, friend of the victim and Starsky’s ‘sponsor’ inside the Hospice, comes across as an intelligent, personal youngster. Hutch is very well-drawn and we are given a Starsky that is almost brilliant. That ‘almost,’ in fact, represents the crux of the story’s true failure. As the situation is originally set up, Starsky is subjected to the initial stages of a subtle and clever brainwashing, in the course of which he confesses the guilt feelings stemming from his perceived neglect of his brother. Mark then becomes a surrogate for Nick as well as an ally, and … nothing. The author simply abandons this line of development… Worse, it deprives the novella of its major thematic focus, at one reducing the issues to glib superficialities an severing the connection between the case under investigation and S&H’s personal concerns…. Of the minor pieces, ‘Starsky and Hutch Remembered.’ a retrospective by the producer’s secretary, manages to overcome its subject matter to be both uninteresting and unilluminating…. [the reviewer pans seven pieces in the zine]. Now, for the good stuff, which is very, very good indeed. “Beginnings’ is less a novella than a series of closely interwoven short stories covering the period between Starsky and Hutch’s thirteenth birthdays and cementing of their friendship at the LA Police Academy…. Marian is a subtle writer, and the balance [of S and H’s different POVs] is frequently delicate…. All in all, it’s a writerly piece of work. Three cheers and a 10. Less ambitious but equally fine is ‘Still the Same,’ an account of what happened four years, six months and twelve days before Vanessa came home to roost in ‘Hutchinson for Murder One.’ It’s marked by Mel’s usual clean style and neat construction, by her clear reading of human motivation…. Another 10. On the humorous side, ‘The Waiting Game’ and “Work, Work, Work’ provide genuinely witty relief to the grimness of the rest of the zine. As exercises in stretching the basic double-entendre, both are delightful. Artwork: the best is Faddis’, out front and running away. The illos for ‘Broken Faith’ are easily her finest work since the ‘shadow-man’ Hutch in The Pits #2 [incidentally, this reviewer wrote ‘shadow-man’]. The characters’ weariness and fear comes through with mirror clarity… Signe Landon’s work for ‘Still the Same’ is competent – her art is never less, but in this case neither is it anything more. The same is true of Nan Lewis’ and Paulie Gilmore’s contributions. The much-touted front cover bears an unfortunately close resemblance to a Warm Touch greeting card, though we are mercifully spared a quote from ‘Jonathan Livingston Seagull’ or ‘The Prophet.’ Plain is better. Recommended, with reservations. [3]
My Scots heritage bridled at first over laying out ten bucks for any zine, but this is quite the most impressive and possibly the best S&H zine to come out yet. Not every phrase in every story is sterling, but the overall quality is exceptionally high, and the zine is well worth the money. There are three particularly skilled pieces, each which could highlight a zine by itself. The first, ‘Still the Same,’ an early-partnership story; four years, six months and an odd number of days, according to the author, did not refer to the time since the Hutchinson’ divorced but since the Hutchinsons last drew blood. The story is intense, vividly described, multitextured, with several almost invisible plot currents running. One bit of Mel’s skill especially worth noting is how she makes use of her point of view: the story from Hutch’s pov portrays Starsky as being deliberately obtuse; from Starsky’s own pov his real sensitivity blazes out and we gather hints why he hides his spirit this way. The contrast is almost extraneous to the triangle plot, but it gives a lovely richness and sense of craft to the story. If ‘Still the Same’ is a diamond, Marian Kelly’s ‘Beginnings’ is a heart. The theme is friendships in the lives of young men…. Less intense than ‘Still the Same, ‘Beginnings’ give at least as much character detail in smaller doses, as well as a comprehensive summum vitae for Our Boys. The reader may disagree with parts of Kelly’s universe, but probably won’t be able to help believing it while in it; it is very convincing and complete, and does not contradict what we know of those years from the aired episodes. Marian shows what strength the use of commonly accepted underpinnings gives a story. The third hosanna goes out to ‘Broken Faith.” This is the second novella (the first was ‘Hide and Seek’ in One Shot) in a probably series of post-Sweet Revenge stories. The connection between the two lies in their asides and resolutions, not in the similarities of their primary plots. In ‘Hide and Seek,’ Starsky returned to the forced and admitted in the course of the story that he could no longer hack Supercop; in ‘Broken Faith,’ both S&H decide by the end they should transfer to less strenuous duty, for while investigating a self-proclaimed Messiah and his truck farm, Starsky came Nearer My God To Thee. There is a problem in criticizing a still evolving series – a critic can read too much out of what is merely coincidence. There’s a problem in writing them, too – the author can’t back up and fix contradictions or lay foreshadowing for a later brilliant idea. In both ‘Hide and Seek’ and ‘Broken Faith’ there is on odd tiredness to the characters, a distance that made it difficult for me personally to get really engaged into the story. This is not to say ‘Broken Faith’ wasn’t well-written, aptly characterized or tightly-plotted, for it was all those things. But I am guess that this tiredness in S&H is deliberateness on Linder’s part and will be dealt with or resolved in future chapters. The remaining sketches and short stories are not as prepossessing as these three juggernauts, but then, they don’t have to be. [About] ‘Time to Grow’… I can’t say how authentic the street gang scenes are, but they come across like bits of 1930’s gangster films. While the writing is reasonably skillful, somehow Wright’s attention is too often unfocused onto distractingly minor business, such as clocks, IV needles or a great deal of rain…. [The reviewer briefly mentions the rest of the zine’s contents]... Buy this zine, or else your mother won’t love you anymore. [4]

References

  1. from S and H #16
  2. from S and H #16
  3. from S and H #16
  4. review by Paula Smith, from S and H #17
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